GO!

SO MUCH BARKING!

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Bentley

More treats.- Always more- treats.
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 1, '13 12:51pm PST 
My 4 month old puppy has the LOUDEST bark in the world and will not stop barking! If any little thing does not go the way he wants, he barks about it. If he drops his treat, instead of going and getting it... he barks at it. He barks at our other dog. He barks when the dog is eating and he isn't. He just barks... a lot. Does anyone have a suggestion of what to do to stop the barking? I read online to separate the dog from what is making him bark and to reward him for being quiet. The issue arises within the fact that he barks at EVERYTHING. How can I separate him from everything around him?

As you can tell, I am getting frustrated and i definitely don't want to take it out on him. He needs to be properly trained to act the way I want him to, I just need help deciding how I should go about that. Thank you, friends! smile
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Lenny

Lenny -The- Wrecking Ball
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 1, '13 2:40pm PST 
I'm one of those people who isn't really bothered by barking, I enjoy the conversation. Of course if your dog is barking at everything, then I can see how that's a little much lol

My suggestion would be to teach him to bark on command. Once you teach him to bark on command, you can also teach him "quiet" on command as well. My beagle/basset boy likes the sound of his own voice and barks when he's frustrated, excited, when he sees a squirrel or the cat go by, when he sees something he wants, when he's happy sometimes he just needs to throw out a good bark. I let him have his fun to a point and then tell him, "Quiet". That's my way of saying, okay I heard you and that's good enough. Acknowledging him when he was barking (Usually I say, Good boy, thank you I hear you!") and then asking for quiet got me the best results. And of course I praised him very heavily and used very high valued treats in the beginning since the joy of barking seemed to out weigh a lot of rewards. And Ignoring his barking never worked for him, he just kept going at it lol

I'm sure others will have more suggestions for you as well, but that's what worked for me the best with my chatterbox. smile

Edited by author Mon Apr 1, '13 2:40pm PST

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Smokey

Let's play tug!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 1, '13 8:21pm PST 
For barking that's not fear based (which should be handled differently,) my suggestion is that good things never happen to barking puppies. Barking makes playtime stop. Barking makes the humans instantly turn away and not look at, touch, or speak to Bentley (not even to say shh). Barking makes treats go away. Barking makes the food bowl get set down on the counter and ignored for five minutes. Silence, on the other hand, makes good things happen. On walks, silence instantly makes clicks and treats happen. It makes attention and praise and play and dinnertime happen. Silence is the best thing ever!
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Jake & Sweet- Caroline

Tricolored- Hounds for life!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 1, '13 10:06pm PST 
He's a basset! They're known talkers. My grandma dog Caroline loves to talk to me. She chirps, barks and whines.

I hate the sound of dogs that bark without reason. And she does bark a lot. had her 3 weeks. By day 3 she understood if she barked I would ignore her. I live in ~500 sq ft. She barks. I got outside. I go cook. I go talk to jake who's being quiet. Eventually she learned if i bark Mom ignores me. I don't want to be ignored!!

Jake is a pretty quiet beagle. Almost unusually so. But i've discovered it's because he probably had a bark collar used on him.

I don't recommend you ever use one of those. I've never used one but jake had a pretty bad reaction to our invisible fence system collar. He's over it now but he didn't like it at all.

But to stop the barking. I would recommend not paying any attention if he barks at you or anything else. Then teach a "Be quiet" command.

Both Caroline and Jake know when i say "Knock it off" or "Quiet" that means shut it now.

good luck!
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Member Since
12/02/2012
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 2, '13 12:05am PST 
Barking can really be annoying especially if it is done frequently. I think the previous poster's idea of teaching your dog the "Quiet" command could work. Or, you could also try and avoid reinforcing the behavior if he continues barking.

If you've noticed that he has been barking repeatedly, try to ignore him. Sometimes dogs bark for attention. If you give them the slightest attention, he will think that 'hey, my owner looked at me. He/She is listening to me whenever I bark.' The result would be a dog continuously barking. dog
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Lupi

I\\\'ll do- anything for a- treat!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 2, '13 9:00am PST 
The other suggestions sound good, but I also wanted to mention that Lupi's barking is directly influenced by the amount of exercise (physical and mental) she receives. The more bored she is, the barkier she gets. You could always try upping the exercise for a few days and see if it helps.
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Bentley

More treats.- Always more- treats.
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 2, '13 1:11pm PST 
Thanks for all of the comments and suggestions, everyone! The only question I have about some of the suggestions is... what if he isn't barking for my attention? He barks at my other dog a lot when he won't play with him or when the other dog is eating, etc. It's not always him barking at me or for a reaction from me. Sometimes he wouldn't even notice if I am paying attention to his barking or not because it isn't for me.
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Jake & Sweet- Caroline

Tricolored- Hounds for life!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 2, '13 6:55pm PST 
You can try startling him into silence using a can of coins you shake.

Or you can give him a command. when jake barks in public i tell him to "focus" and he stops barking long enough to focus on me. Since "focus" command means DROP EVERYTHING RIGHT NOW AND LOOK AT MOM. So at that time he's looking at you and then you treat him and then if he's quiet you tell him "quiet" and treat him again big grin

That's how i taught jake to behave.
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Member Since
12/02/2012
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 3, '13 12:01am PST 
There are various of reasons why your dog could be barking. For one, it could be his playfulness or excitement which is why he's trying to get the attention of your other dog.

I think what would really help you to figure out what you can do is identifying why your dog is barking in the first place. Here is a link for tips on controlling and stopping your dog's excessive barking: http://dogs.about.com/od/dogtraining/qt/barkingdogs.htm.
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 3, '13 12:19pm PST 
Part of the problem, too, is breed. This is what hounds DO.....when they are aroused, they give a lot of voice, which is how hunting with them works. So hounds particularly are extremely challenging.

I do agree with the advice that teaching to bark on command opens the door to teach being quiet on command. Beyond this, look beyond the bark and towards the frustrations that allow things to escalate. "I want that really bad" or "I can't get to that" or "I think I am getting close to that"....these are all really functional for a hound as to what he's supposed to do when on his quarry, as is emotional escalation generally. His genetics are saying bark NOW! So.....sometimes we are working with a naughty dog who needs guidance and structure, whereas other times we are working at a trait of function. These are different things. Giant Schnauzers, my breed, are very talky and loooove to bark, just for the drama. I can far more expect, fairly, to teach a Giant to "quiet" because he's just being a bozo, vs a hound, who is doing something really functional. It's a lot easier and fairer to say "stop being a bozo" vs "stop being a hound."

So here's some prelim advice. Some of the things you can do is to lessen the frustration. Redirect. If another dog has a toy or bone, you need to redirect your pup, and help him more to emotionally cope with his frustration. He's young and immature, so an obvious thing would be to lessen these instances. Just try to give each something together. Or, when it does occur, gain your pup's focus (ok, so he's a hound....I KNOW that's not easy laugh out loud), and engage him in something fun. You can also tie each to doorknobs in a room, opposite from each other. Treat one, with Bailey sitting quietly at attention across the room before he gets his own. Also, have them sit side by side for treats, with him showing composure, even when his dog mate gets treated.

Let me know if this was helpful or if you need me to blab more. Fine to give examples and I can tell what I'd do. Just don't get too frustrated....he's a hound wink

Edited by author Wed Apr 3, '13 12:27pm PST

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