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Behavior & Training > Reactive dog doesnt react to a specific breed?
Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Sat Jul 13, '13 11:22am PST 
Lukie was a PERFECT gentleman until he spotted a white Standard Poodle. Could be any other color OR any other size for some reason. The minute he spied one he would leap into the air and try to kill it!
It was a pretty major problem at dog shows because the SPoos AND the Frenchies are shown in the same group and often shared a ring.
I had a large white mini poodle in show trim and he could have cared less about him.
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» There has since been 17 posts. Last posting by Bunny, Jul 15 3:19 pm

Saying Goodbye: Memorials & Support > Cremation ashes, 1 year later
Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 2, '13 10:35am PST 
When I lost Gertrude our clinic offered a foot print in plaster. I had that done, along with a swatch of her hair, and painted it a color that matched a portrait I have of her. I keep them both hanging right above my desk...in fact, there are way, way too many paintings of pals I have lost hanging above my desk!!
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Maggie (I'm Moms Angel Now), Aug 27 8:41 pm


Saying Goodbye: Memorials & Support > Cremation ashes, 1 year later

Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Fri May 31, '13 5:39pm PST 
My Frenchie, Gertrude, lived for kayaking so I took her ashes on a kayaking trip to her favorite pond and buried them on an island there. I couldn't quite wrap my mind around scattering them on the water.
Like you, it took me a while... she died in September and I took her ashes out in June of the following year.
Sadly, when Lukie died it was totally unexpected and I was away so he was cremated in a mass cremation. I do have his favorite toy on a shelf in our boarding kennel and take it down and hold it often!
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Maggie (I'm Moms Angel Now), Aug 27 8:41 pm


Behavior & Training > Does your dog have an arch nemesis?

Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Wed May 29, '13 4:57am PST 
Lukie had a lifelong obsession with white standard poodles. Didn't matter where he was, but usually happened at dog shows. We would be walking along and passing hundreds of dogs, other big, white dogs, and nothing. Suddenly he would spy a white spoo and leap into the air to attack it.
I had several large white mini poodles and he had no problems with them at all, even when they were in the fuu fuu show clip.
It WAS a problem at dog shows since Spoos and Frenchies are both in the non-sporting group so they often had to be shown in the same ring at the shows.
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» There has since been 17 posts. Last posting by MIKA&KAI, Jun 5 7:06 am


Dog Health > yelping yorkie

Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 10, '12 3:09pm PST 
I'm gonna contradict Louie and Nina here. Having dealt with Frenchies since 1980, I need to point out that steroids are a critical component in ANY dog's recovery from a disk/spine issue. Without them, not only does the swelling in the disk not decrease, it actually INCREASES due to the reaction of the nerves and muscles to the pain. If not given immediately, this swelling can and WILL lead to permanent paralysis!!!
There are three critical steps in dealing with spinal injury in dogs (and people, too, I write from experience!!!) The first is steroids... usually injection followed by decreasing oral doses daily. Second is muscle relaxants to relieve the muscle spasms which continue to create swelling (and risk of paralysis), and the third is COMPLETE cage rest. The dog needs to be carried out to relieve itself and carried back inside to the crate. ANY walking carries the risk of permanent paralysis.
Waiting out a suspected spinal or disk injury is playing Russian roulette with your dogs future health...the sooner the steroids are started, the better the chances of complete recovery.
Lukie had about one spinal issue per year. His problem area was a disk in his neck, and his first sign of trouble was to hold one front leg straight out and scream. My vet was so convinced in the IMMEDIATE use of steroids that I always had an injection of dex to give at the first symptom, before I even took him to the vets. His "confinement" was normally three weeks, and fortunately, with this treatment proticol he ALWAYS recovered fully and we were able to avoid surgery.
In my own case, my physican tried several times to treat my back with just muscle relaxants and pain pills. They didn't do a thing, if there was any relief, it was temporary and the pain and numbness of my leg started right up again as soon as I stopped taking them.
With the addition of just TEN DAYS of steroids, I was completely cured until the next time I did something stupid, usually at least a year or more down the road.
Of course, in the case of the OP, NONE of us are vets and we can't even observe the dog so calling a spinal issue is certainly NOT up to us... this dog needs to see a vet immediately, IMO!
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Kali, Nov 12 6:19 pm

Dog Health > Why do ppl get breeds of dogs that have bad health issues and not do anything to help it?
Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 21, '12 4:41am PST 
IMO, MOST of the issues like this bulldog can be blamed on the breeders/sellers not educating the puppy buyers. I do believe more than 75% of these buyers got the dog on impulse, either directly from a BYB OR from a pet store, NEITHER of which did one iota of education when it comes to potential health issues with the breed.
Furthermore, had these buyers done some research, most likely they could have ended up with a healthy dog from a reputable breeder instead of something cranked out just for profit.
Just yesterday I got emails from THREE owners who had purchased Frenchies from me...the youngest was 10 years old, the oldest 13. NOT ONE of these dogs has health issues and these people were calling inquiring about adding another Frenchie to their family. They WERE educated and knew that WHERE you get your dog is more important than how much you spend, and they all knew what to look for in terms of prebreeding testing, etc.
Had the above bulldog owners been educated about health issues perhaps they would have ended up with a healthy dog. Not all bulldogs have eye/ear issues if responsible breeding practices are followed.
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» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by Mishka & Luna, Oct 25 7:58 am


Dog Health > Opinions on MRI.. treatment for back problems

Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 8, '12 6:02am PST 
Lukie had frequent episodes with back issues and was treated immediately with crate rest, steroids, and muscle relaxants. I was warned repeatedly that each instance could be the one that caused complete paralysis, so we had the drugs on hand to start the second he was in pain.
The surgery was out of the question for me financially, but fortunately, with immediate injection of steroids and the cage rest, he always recovered fully.
The MRI can be done at any point because it will indicate the vertebrae in question whether in an acute phase or not.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Scooter, PAWS , Sep 10 12:31 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Differences between French Bulldogs and Boston terriers?

Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 30, '12 5:33pm PST 
I will definitely agree about the dog aggression part. Also, the exercise tolerance. Frenchies are pretty much done in with a sedate walk around the block, assuming the temperature is between 45 and 65. Any higher or lower and they are in trouble.
They were basically bred to be an indoor companion to the people in the home. As such, they are PERFECT, but for an all around, active outdoorsy dog the majority leave much to be desired. I have had Frenchies for about 30 years and have had TWO that I considered doggy dogs, (Lukie was one of them)... they both could and did swim, hike, and otherwise participate in outside activities. The rest either wouldn't or couldn't. Almost all my Frenchies are good with one other dog of the opposite sex but are more than willing to fight with same sex or in a group of three or more.
Why do I love them???? They make me laugh, they entertain me, and they ARE great indoor companions!!!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Aug 30 5:33 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > French Bulldog

Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 22, '12 1:43pm PST 
This is our very, very favorite Frenchie rescue and they do a great job!
http://frenchbulldogvillage.net/
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Aug 22 1:43 pm

Raw Food Diet > Just switched to raw and now noticed missing tooth
Ch. Luke, in memory.

Luke--- the dog talking
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 22, '12 12:07pm PST 
I know with Frenchies and other breeds with undershot bites that they often lose the bottom incisors. My vets say it is because of the lack of pressure on the teeth causing a failure of the tissue to stay strong and hold the teeth in place since they do not meet the top teeth.
Supposedly lots of bone chewing and tugging is supposed to help keep that tooth holding tissue stronger and healthier.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Nikki, Aug 28 3:32 am

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