Postings by Brady SDiT

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Service & Therapy Dogs > Another Suspected Faker
Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Thu Dec 12, '13 7:31pm PST 
I have been training Brady for over a year but thanks for assuming you know me. His behavior isn't perfect 100%, and he is corrected when it isn't. I do hold him to a higher standard than most but that is my preference, not too much higher or different from others I have spoken to on here and in the SD community. I didn't cry faker to anyone, just a brief mention to a manager as, SD user or not, sniffing/ licking merchandise of an off leash dog in a food section of a store is just ridiculous. A service dog should also NEVER approach a person five feet away from their handler off leash just to say 'hi'. This was not Petsmart or Petco and I don't know the temperament of this dog when I am eye level with it. The human family with me was completely offended at this dog, so for laypersons they too were overreacting at its behavior and the attitude of the handler.

My attitude is reflective of someone who is glad and honored to be able to have an SD and doesn't want that taken away just because some person and their partner has horrid manners or they are just cheating the system.

See this news report from near my area, http://www.winknews.com/Local-Florida/2013-12-11/Fake-service-dogs-h urt-those-who-actually-need-them#.Uqp8RbSo71M

Now, although they have the housing issue wrong (not nearly descriptive enough for the FHA rules and ESAs), apparently the issue in my area is enough to get an SD user to speak on it. I'm proud my state allows SDiTs and OTs public access, what if because of these people the laws change, and not for the better. They can be made so strict to the point where I would lose most of my rights along with so many others, including trainers like me in my area, professional trainers who might not work for a 'school' or 'program'.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Harley, SD, CGC, TDI, Jan 6 10:36 am

Service & Therapy Dogs > New to this Forum
Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 1, '13 12:57am PST 
Welcome Maggie, wishing your journey the best. Sounds like you guys will be a great team. big grin
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Sir Balin le Savage (Balin), Dec 2 9:47 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Another Suspected Faker

Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 1, '13 12:55am PST 
Well considering she was breaking the ADA law “Under the ADA, service animals must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless …”, showed none of the limitations to that law, and literally showed neither care nor concern over her dog roaming all over an aisle, messing with anything and everything like it’s a pet store, I’ll remain suspicious of her status regardless what one might call it. As SD handlers it is our job to know all the laws, especially ADA, and have a sense of proper conduct, I wish more pet owners had half the manners of SDs.confused

My disability is visible on my bad days and invisible on my good especially due to my younger age and I receive the looks and comments like others on SDTD Dogster. I don’t need to have a true invisible disability (diabetes, seizures, psychiatric) compared to a more obvious visible disability to feel their same public scrutiny. Even when just using my cane or parking placard, oh the looks I get and they are terrible, someone just told me the other day I “look too young to be disabled”. What is too young? I hate to think what rudeness the veterans with their PTSD or physical disabilities receive. Stereotyping is often human nature, the goal is to keep it positive for our own sakes and to teach as we can. I like educating the public same as my students, and presenting yourself as a good example is part of that. I might have helped this woman had she asked, but I didn’t get the vibe that she would have wanted any.

I have seen plenty of legitimate teams for all sorts of issues, visible or invisible, and they act like they did their homework, the same as we tell all curious who come here looking for help, the help we are glad to offer. We were all new once, and mistakes are made or bad days are had, it happens in all people and dogs. But there is a clear difference between awkward newbie handlers, in training SDs, or bad day mistakes (Program, ADI, or OT SDs/ SDiTs for any disability), and people that just want to bring their dogs everywhere. Even mistakes and bad days should be met with proper corrections and good recovery.smile

Purse dogs are truly rampant in my area and rarely larger dogs. I used to work in retail and saw them all the time; dogs in enclosed doggie strollers, enclosed in purses and carriers, and even few week old puppies held in arms (saw this last week at a seafood counter). Many make the excuse of not leaving them in a hot car, instead of just leaving their pets at home. Most willing describe them as their pet and ‘baby’. Businesses are so afraid that they are not willing to even ask their legally allowed questions with my own managers as an example. So it continues unabated and is increasing. Even ‘SD only no pets allowed’ signs are increasing on the doors of my local businesses here to try to curb the issue.

I try, try to give people the benefit of the doubt, but when their behavior affects how my outings go, it gets to me. Sure they might let the public pet their SD, but when that same public DEMANDS to pet my SD, like Lucy’s restaurant incident, it becomes a stressful problem. I only reported it, like Harley suggests, when a dog is misbehaving and this particular SD clearly was at the hands of her negligent partner. I merely told them to keep an eye out in case of the worst with a dog with no leash, the main issue I mentioned as per the law. Such bad behavior is why the online people get so up in arms over training and etiquette, not just to be mean or judgmental. Please don’t feel like I swear people are not individuals, have invisible disabilities, bad days, inadequate training, or are newbies and just label them ‘fakers’. Just remember that what we see is what the public sees and is reflected right back at us and how we are treated or what rights we have.
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by Harley, SD, CGC, TDI, Jan 6 10:36 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Another Suspected Faker

Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 29, '13 11:49pm PST 
Well here I go again, and I am sad to post this.

It takes place in, none other than Wal-Mart. Went in to get cat litter and dog chews, had my human SD so I did not need Brady which was a good thing. He would have hated the Black Friday mobs because I could barely move my wheelchair through any aisles without adding another foot and a half to my width. So low and behold, we see a dog in a red generic floppy handled SD vest with little clip on 'cert/ADA' type tag and black strap ‘SD’ patch. The weimaraner SD in question and his partner broke nearly every etiquette rule I can think of to the horror of even my human SD (who is used to how good SDs act). The dog was unleash/tethered, being encouraged to be overly petted by an old couple, paid no ounce of attention to its owner, was allowed to be 'loose' to sniff toys, food, treats, and even walked over to sniff my wheelchair. I nearly lost it as she half apologized and I stiffly told her that I was a handler and her SD had bad manners. My heart was racing as she barely called her dog back and then stayed quiet, not an ounce of conflict or defense that I would have expected.

I was fuming all the way out (as we were done) and politely mention to the management to keep an eye on her and what 'rules' she was breaking. I was so horrified, and glad Brady wasn't with me, an off-leash SD coming at me, what if the dog was dog-aggressive? Certainly would have distracted Brady a little no matter how good he is, or worse if there had been a confrontation. For as rare as SDs are, as rarer SD fakers should be, why am I suddenly seeing them everywhere, especially the latter (and not just purse dogs either)? Sigh.
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» There has since been 17 posts. Last posting by Harley, SD, CGC, TDI, Jan 6 10:36 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Giant breeds as service dogs.

Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 23, '13 1:02am PST 
Mine is a Bridgeport (like yours in your pictures Beo) because I couldn’t afford BLD no matter how beautiful and pieces of art they are. I just didn’t have the money for one, plus I’ll be retiring Brady in a few years and that’s hardly enough time to put so much into a harness for him. The Bridgeport works for what we need it for. Mine is also the tall version, yours the short, but Brady is shorter and I am taller, just within good range. I’ll probably donate this it once I get my next SD, which will be a larger and taller breed or mix. I should be able to afford a custom BLD by then. I understand your mom got help and that was awesome, but that kind of help just isn’t available where I live sadly. Everyone is different of course, and everyone’s ability to afford varies. Just because the equipment isn’t the best doesn’t mean it doesn’t work just as well, for the most part.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Ginger DSA ThD TT CGC &hearts, Dec 1 9:38 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Giant breeds as service dogs.
Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 19, '13 9:51pm PST 
I hope when I look for my next prospect that it will be a extra-large to giant either purebred or specific cross-bred. Having raised and trained giant fuzzies before means I understand most of the nuances of training, grooming, and people's reactions in dog friendly shops, etc. But the issues mentioned are some I have with my current large SD, and of course will be amplified by a giant. Like Brady hates going under tables in public places, especially if he is wearing his mobility gear, it gets caught because it is so tall. So he sits out but tucked as neatly out of the way as possible. I worry most about planes and some restaurants or stores with incredibility narrow isles, especially for a wheelchair and a larger SD. Also worry about that custom gear, for the cost even though I'm sure it will last a lifetime. There are a lot of new MSDs that are Danes and Mastiffs, I know you are not alone, just hoping they will pipe in. smile
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Ginger DSA ThD TT CGC &hearts, Dec 1 9:38 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > getting an SD

Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 19, '13 1:07am PST 
My apologies for the length.

I agree with Happy and Sun. I was able to owner train Brady because I had the time out of work, I had raised him as a puppy, and I knew how to train a dog in all things pre-SDiT. I’m a member of the local Obedience Club in my area, which means socializing, training, and manners are already taught to all my dogs (and I don’t compete). As Sun said, that is not normal for most pet owners, to have the time or ability to train their dogs even how to walk on a leash without pulling or gagging themselves, forget SDiTs/ SDs. Happy and Sun both mentioned good points, and to show you what we all mean here is a recent story that I just had but not a week ago.

A student of my basic class came in with her year old Newfie, such a beauty and a soft spot for me. I could tell right away that she was struggling with this dog; he wasn’t healing well and wasn’t listening to her but a third the time. When I asked her about her dog, she said he was in training to be an SD for her, for her fibro and narcolepsy. She had never owned the breed, knew little other than their ‘sweet and easy going temperament’ and size to help her. Well those are the average Newf traits, but not all are the same. She mentioned her late husband had an SD, she wanted one to help with her stability and to alert her in daily activities. If she ever reads this, I’m sorry, but there were flags everywhere to me, not just as a trainer, but as an SD handler.

First she had never OT an SD before, never trained a giant male dog before, full of hormones and strength, and finally that he was a rescue from a less than ideal beginning. Even though she got him at three months, she didn’t enroll him in puppy class or even beginner obedience then, but waited until he was already a year to train in the basics with us. She admitted she had been so sick and tired that she hadn’t had the time or effort to really get into his training in those crucial early months. She said he already goes everywhere with her yet he couldn’t even focus on her at all, his attention at a heel was always on the ground or the air, as if there was a female in heat nearby. Not even a tasty morsel could get this boys attention for more than a minute and this is normal for him outside of class. I am truly worried for her, sent her talk to a Newfie savvy friend to see if it is hormones or if this boy is too independent minded to serve her.

Even if he can help her with some of her problems, what if he never has the manners or focus for PA work? What if he becomes too much for her to handle with her fragile state? I never even mentioned the possibility of him not working out or getting his hips/elbows clearanced for mobility work. I hope things work out for her, as Sun said, it’s hard and heartbreaking to washout a pup that just couldn’t cut it. Sadly, most OTs won’t wash out a dog but will continue to use the dog, faults and all, even if presenting a bad image for us all.

Not everyone can or should train their own dog, same as every dog can’t be a SD. I recommend not just getting any dog or any trainer. The dog must also be reliable, sure some have luck with rescues or really young puppies but that is not the norm and is risky for washing out. You might need a trainer that knows more than AKC rally to train an SDiT or SD candidate, especially to help train a task or for a specific disability, even PSD work. As for the dog, be very picky. Even breeder bred dogs (like many programs use) have a high enough wash out with all the careful rearing, raising, and training so just imagine what a recycled dog can have for baggage. One unknown, one opps, and the dog can be washed out in a day. IMO, lots of SD organizations, from what I have seen, that use rescues do so to be both altruistic and as a way to easily acquire cheaper dogs. No matter where a dog is acquired from, the wash out is high enough, best to stack the odds in your favor and not against, and try to be patient. Brady beat four others that failed their candidacy to be my SD, because he had the right stuff, and the others did not. I don’t look forward to finding his replacement someday; there are many here who will attest to that with their own SDs.

Cost is still a factor; you must have the money to spend, no matter how much of a tax break you get in the end. Remember that the amount spent on medical services/devices (SDs) has to be enough to count on taxes verses your income or it doesn’t count at all.

There is a lot that goes into SDs, selection, knowing your disability, knowing what the dog can do to mitigate it and is the stress of the dog worth the benefit. There are years of early training and on-going training for life, battles and harassments, family and friend drama, work drama (ask Harley’s mom), and using them as a tool for you and not just about having a dog with you 24/7. It’s a long road, I wish only the best and know that there are others, like on here, that are more than willing to help.

I would take Happy’s advice on helping you with finding a PSDs, I would also talk to Olivander’s mom and Iris’s mom. Take care and good luck!
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Beowulfs Beauregard CGC CGCA, Nov 20 11:50 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Best responses for "WHATISTHAT?!CANIPET?!OHMYGODWHEREDOIGETONE?!"

Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 6, '13 11:58pm PST 
I'll second Obie's mom on the issues with Smooth-coated Collies, but instead of merle, I have tricolor. Oh the comments "Is that a Collie, is that a collie mix, is that a GSD, is the a doberman mix". Generally the Collie nose does give it away, but I just tell them the breed and be done with it. Often people admire the short hair, which they don't associate with the breed, but then I tell them don't be fooled, it shed just as much (if not more).

As for petting, I tell them no, simply and with a bit of firmness, otherwise they will still try or persist. Sometimes they will ask "does he/she bite?", which upon the "no" they take as a free pass to pet without almost further asking. Patches are hit and miss whether people see/read them or ignore them. As for general harassment/ pestering, I usually ignore or gently tell these people off as in "uh, I'm busy" or "he is working and we cannot be bothered". Had a elderly guy in Winn-Dixie ask me to stop walking so he could 'see' Brady. It's like 'sorry dude, I'm on a mission and am not a parade'. You have to try to just shake them off as best as you can by your own means and personality.

I like Polly's cards for education on the fly.

Like it has been said, any breed or mix can do an SD job with the right training and ability, some will just receive more attention, good or bad, than others. Often the rarer the breed/mix, the more curious. The more known for being protective or aggressive in the public eye, the more caution. Even for a Collie, that 'could be a GSD' look has had some people just a tad worried from what I have observed on how they react, or could just be a general fear of dogs. :/ Happily I mostly get the curious and happy types. smile
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Diesel, Oct 20 7:04 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Harley

Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 1, '13 11:07pm PST 
Brady and I send our best and hugs to you both. Like Yoshi and others, I have followed your story and your inspiration as a new handler. Keep us posted, will be following on FB!
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Flicka ~ CGC, Oct 29 5:20 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > It finally happened.
Brady SDiT

Full steam- ahead.
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 21, '13 9:19pm PST 
We did not think you were mean, and we aren’t trying to be mean in return though you had an idea from the start of where this would go as you stated in your first comment. Our responses are a little … passionate, because it is a very touchy topic and sensitive in its nature to many SD handlers. Please understand that you admitted that you don’t own an SD and aren’t around those that do. It’s not easy to understand what we experience and what our lives are without living it yourself, trust me, it was a lot for me at first and almost overwhelming.

We are simply explaining to you, with our personal stories, tragedies, and perceptions. The public’s pestering, petting, talking, harassing (which is illegal in many states), or other interactions with SDs can be a huge deal for us. Like Iris said, our health and well-being always comes before anyone’s happiness by interacting with a ‘dog’ in public.

I assume you are on here to learn about SDs, SD handlers, and the world and issues we deal with. Yay! I’m glad for it, I wish everyone wanted to learn more about us instead of just assuming everything when they see us in public. You’d be amazed how much my own family has learned. I hope you continue to learn more, ask more questions, and give your opinions with the honesty you did. An open-mind is a great thing to have, trust me. Take care.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Diesel, Oct 20 7:40 pm

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