Postings by Ginny Weasley

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Senior Dogs > Active Dogster Groups for Senior Dogs?

Ginny- Weasley

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Barked: Mon Jan 7, '13 3:38pm PST 
Hi, everyone! Just s quick question; is anyone here a member of any groups for senior dogs that are actually active? I did a quick search, but it seemed like most of the groups for seniors hadn't been posted in in months. Thanks! puppy
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Beasley , Mar 13 2:02 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Interesting article on Length of Stay in shelters..
Ginny- Weasley

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Barked: Mon Jan 7, '13 12:22pm PST 
This has been my experience, volunteering at a small, mainly no-kill shelter in a fairly rural community in the Northeast. None of this is based on statistics or anything of that sort, just the impressions that I've gotten from volunteering there:

* Black dogs' length of stay isn't really affected by their color, especially in the case of black labs. People tend to go crazy over them! I personally have a weakness for black dogs, but then again I love the bully breeds, as well. Anyway, I'm getting off topic...

* Pit bulls - Again, just from observation, there are a number of factors as to whether or not a pit bull gets adopted -- far more than just their breed. If the pit is is a puppy, it will get snatched up in a heartbeat. If it is good with small children, other dogs, and cats, it definitely won't be there very young. The problem with pit bulls is when they have any sort of aggression issues (even if it's not really aggression, just that they can't be around cats/small children because they play hard). There are also little things that can make a difference -- for example, cropped ears tend to make them appear more vicious, and if the dog is barking it's a huge turn off for potential adopters. But the pit bulls do ultimately get adopted.

Then again, we definitely have a higher intake of pitbulls then any other breed. It mainly has to do with landlord issues, unfortunately... and there are far more pitbulls running around as strays. frown

* Small dogs go WAY faster than medium-big dogs. But the huge dogs go fast as well. I think it's a novelty thing.

* The Beagle thing is weird to me. I feel like a lot of families find Beagles to be the ideal dog.

Thankfully, we're talking about a fairly rural community with a relatively high demand for dogs. The shelter itself usually has a maximum of 20 adoptable dogs, so if 10 of those are healthy, friendly pitbulls then they are bound to get adopted eventually, unless they have issues that interfere with their adaptability.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Jan 21 10:35 pm


Dog Laws & Legislation > PETA

Ginny- Weasley

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Barked: Sat Jan 5, '13 7:16pm PST 
That is SO weird... and kind of awful, if you ask me, especially because it's really difficult to tell if a cat is feral just by plucking it off the streets -- I mean, it's been living on the streets! Of course it's going to be scared and defensive! Plus, there are so many places -- foster homes, rescue groups, trainers, etc -- that have had success domesticating "feral" cats. I'm surprised people still go to that vet!
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Colt, Feb 5 5:24 pm


American Pit Bull Terrier > Dog Aggression

Ginny- Weasley

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Barked: Sat Jan 5, '13 6:05pm PST 
Hi! I have a question about dog aggression. Basically I just want to get as many opinions as I can from experienced pit bull owners.

I have never owned a pittie, but have lately taken a HUGE liking to the breed. Now, I'll admit that a huge part of this is from Animal Planet's Pit Bulls and Parolees, Pit Boss, etc... and although these are reality TV shows, I'm obviously not going to base all of my information on a breed off of the media (cough, cough BSL).

Here's my issue -- next year, I intend to foster dogs. I'm living in a dorm room right now, so can't have any pets with me. But I will be in an apartment soon enough and will finally be allowed to have some doggy friends! I would really like to rescue dogs from the ACC, or similar urgent environments (for the record, I am doing a lot of research and am doing this RESPONSIBLY. I am aware that pit bulls need a lot of exercise daily and am not planning on having more than a few at a time. So no comments on the apartment thing please smile.

Here's the thing... most of the research that I've done online has pointed in the direction of pitbulls having strong natural tendencies towards dog aggression if not properly socialized, since they were bred for fighting (excuse me while I puke). This doesn't particularly put me off, as I am fully willing to commit to properly socializing any dog that comes into my care. So my question basically is, IF the dog is properly socialized from a young age then is there still a more than slim chance of dog aggression forming? I intend to pretty much have dogs coming and going from my home as they get adopted, and this could serve as a serious problem if they can't be trained to be accepting and dog-friendly. I would also like to be able to take them to environments with other dogs (I know a lot of people will disagree with taking pits to dog parks etc, but that's a discussion for another time).

I also have a roommate who is planning on getting a cat. She's agreed to only adopt a kitten or a cat that is already dog-friendly. But could this be a problem, even if a pit bull is adopted as a puppy and socialized with cats from the beginning?

What do you guys think? Will I need to put my dreams of rescuing pit bulls on hold for now, or can they successfully grow up with a love for other dogs if trained properly?

Thanks, and sorry this was so long! dog
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Xx Sabrina Selene xX, Feb 11 7:22 am


Dog Laws & Legislation > PETA

Ginny- Weasley

Biiiiig kisses!
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 5, '13 5:25pm PST 
Hmm... so I've decided to do my own research into PETA, since I've heard so much good and bad (mainly bad) and wanted to see what it really is all about. I've just been doing some primary research and going over their policies, and I'm a bit confused by their view on Feral Cats (http://www.peta.org/about/why-peta/feral-cats.aspx). (Sorry, I know that this is a dog forum but I figured I could post this here anyway. If it's inappropriate then I apologize; I'm new here. :p)

Basically, they explain why they see "trapping, vaccinating, altering, and releasing feral cats" as not in the animals' best interests UNLESS they are "isolated from roads, people, and animals who could harm them, are regularly attended to by people who not only feed them but also provide them with veterinary care, and are kept in areas where they do not have access to wildlife and the weather is temperate."

What I basically want to ask them is, what alternative do they propose? They don't mention one on that page. ^^ Is it euthanasia? Not saying that I agree with this (I don't at all), BUT if it is the case then I am confused by their euthanasia page (http://www.peta.org/issues/companion-animals/euthanasia.aspx). Here they say that "the only way to stop the suffering of the innocent victims of companion animal overpopulation is to prevent their births through sterilization efforts" and that "until dog and cat overpopulation is brought under control through spaying and neutering, we must prevent the suffering of unwanted animals [through euthanasia]."

So my question is, if they ARE advocating for euthanasia as a better alternative to trapping, spaying/neutering feral cats, and releasing them, then what's up with the contradiction advocating for spaying/neutering in order to put an END to euthanasia?

I'm confused. Does anyone more familiar with the organization have any input?
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Colt, Feb 5 5:24 pm

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