Postings by Jagger **ADOPTED**

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Choosing the Right Dog > Most "bomb-proof" breeds?
Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 23, '13 5:19pm PST 
Nuts in a good way. That is Jagger to a T. He was a crazy boy. Lots of fun with a lot of potential as a sport dog. He was the right amount of naughty. wink
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» There has since been 22 posts. Last posting by Jackson Tan, Feb 25 3:50 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Most "bomb-proof" breeds?
Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 23, '13 12:16pm PST 
My first foster dog was pretty bomb-proof. He was an Australian shepherd/boxer cross. You could take him anywhere and he took it all in stride. Dogs could explode in his face and he never took offense. The only thing that made him a bit less rock solid was that he was a bit handler sensitive. You couldn't get too upset with him or he would wilt.

Though I don't think such rock-solid temperaments are common in boxers or Aussies. In this case, it was just the individual dog.
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» There has since been 24 posts. Last posting by Jackson Tan, Feb 25 3:50 am


Behavior & Training > The Correct Response to Play Nipping???

Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 30, '12 1:20pm PST 
My foster boy was mouthy. He never hurt me; he had GREAT bite inhibition but I didn't want him to do it. Most people aren't fans of being mouthed and I wanted him to get a home!

If he put his mouth on me, I ignored him completely. Even if he was wrapped around my ankle or pulling on my clothing. Putting his mouth on me made me totally disengage. If it went on too long, I put him away. After several minutes I would let him back out to try again.

I used this both for his excitement mouthing of me and his overly exuberant play with Risa. If he couldn't control himself, he got a "time out" and a chance to try again. He was a quick study. It didn't take him more than 3 time outs to figure out he needed to be a bit less crazy!
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Smokey, Dec 31 10:07 am


Behavior & Training > HELP ME PLEASE! (Houstan we have a jumper)

Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 23, '12 6:02am PST 
When I first brought Jagger into the home, he was like a Mexican jumping bean. He was all over me and overflowing with excitement. On top of that, he simply did not know what to do with himself. I had dealt with jumpers before; the dog I was helping to train become a service dog was a jumper too. With her, I simply turned and presented my back to her when she jumped up. Once her paws were on the floor, I returned my attention to her. If she leaped at me again, I turned away again. Four on the floor = attention from me. Jumping did not get her what she wanted.

Jagger, of course, was a bit more out of control with his jumping than she was. He also has killer ups and can jump high enough that his head is level with mine! Still, I employed a similar method. If he jumped on me, I ignored him completely. I just stood still as a statue no matter what he did. Sometimes, it took several minutes before he was calm enough for me to move. And then it often started him going again so I went back to playing statue. This method was VERY effective. Within less than a week, his crazy jumping all over me had decreased by more than half. After almost 2 months staying with me, his jumping is almost non-existent. He still does it on occasion but, more often than not, he catches himself before he makes contact with me.

The biggest key to using this method is PATIENCE. That, and wearing clothes you don't care about just in case. wink
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Sabi, Dec 23 4:09 pm


Behavior & Training > Male Dogs and Their Potty Issues

Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 19, '12 4:08pm PST 
And I thought Jagger was just 'special.' I always asked him how he can be 2 years old and not know how to aim!! He doesn't always pee on his front legs but he does it often enough. I guess I'm thankful he licks himself clean afterward.

Girl dogs are so much easier. LOL.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Jagger **ADOPTED**, Dec 19 4:08 pm

Behavior & Training > Dogs new to horses . . .. what are the common reactions?
Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 15, '12 7:02pm PST 
Risa is totally fine with horses. Granted, I have never let her get really close but they don't faze her at all. Considering her fearfulness, this has always surprised me. I joke that it's because she's from Montana. smile

Jagger saw ponies at an adoption event last weekend and he was afraid of them. Again, he did not get close, but he barked at them as they walked past. He might have been alright if he'd had a chance to investigate but I'd rather play it safe than sorry when it comes to stuff like that.

I think most dogs are programmed to chase what runs. Depending on the breed or individual dog, they might grab and maim. They are predators after all.
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» There has since been 168 posts. Last posting by Augusta, CGC, RN, Jan 26 4:15 pm


Behavior & Training > Breed Differences -- How Do They Impact Temperament, Behavior, Aggression, Training?

Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 29, '12 5:56pm PST 
Reactivity is different than true aggression. The reactive dog does not want to engage and acts aggressively due to fear. An aggressive dog wants the fight. Risa is reactive but she hasn't attacked Jagger (he's only been here a month). In fact, they've been playing.

Anyway, breed differences definitely play a huge part in training. Risa is a sensitive soul partially due to her herding breed/sighthound nature. My foster boy, Jagger, is also very sensitive (he's probably a Aussie/Boxer cross). He's not nearly as soft as Risa is in that he doesn't shut down if you're visibly frustrated. Risa used to flop over and refuse to do anything if I yelled at her (I don't do this anymore because it clearly gets me nowhere). Jagger isn't quite so dramatic but you can tell he starts to take it to heart if you're a bit upset with him. It's surprising because, for the most part, he's a huge blockhead silly boy. With both dogs, I have to watch myself carefully and keep my temper. Nothing good happens if I get the dogs upset because I am! Gotta keep training fun and keep them both up. It's definitely a challenge for me but those sensitive guys are so in tune it's worth it.

I've been fortunate to not have much experience with aggressive dogs. But I would imagine dogs who were bred to be protective and/or go after difficult quarry (terriers, doxies) would be more intense and more 'into the moment' when it comes to aggression over breeds who were bred to be more laid back.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Jackson Tan, Nov 30 3:16 am


Behavior & Training > Ways to Bond with a New Dog

Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 23, '12 8:04pm PST 
Just relax and take your time. I think hand feeding is a good idea and a nice way to help build a bond.

I recently took in a foster dog. The first couple days, he was a wild man! Every time I let him out of his kennel he blasted out like his butt was on fire! He jumped up, mouthed me, and was a general nuisance. No manners at all. I expected this. The stress of a huge life change, not knowing what to expect in the new house, not knowing if he could trust this new person. If I had judged him by the first week only, I would not know the true Jagger.

What I did was just give him time to learn the routine of the house. I did set up rules as I can't have him being an uncontrolled maniac all the time. Besides, he needs some manners if he is ever going to get adopted! I started doing some basic clicker training with him to show him that I am a source of good things and that he should look to me. I also made sure to spend time with him ALONE without my other dog around. It's really easy for dogs to bond to each other so it's important to give a new dog one-on-one human time. smile

Instead of tethering, I have an X-pen set up in the living room so he can have some freedom and ability to watch what's going on without me having to keep an eye on him all the time. With a new dog, I think it's important to limit their freedom so they stay out of trouble. Especially since the first 2-4 weeks is the "honeymoon period" when many dogs don't act like their true selves.

Just take your time and your new dog will come around.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Sparkles, Nov 27 5:06 am


Behavior & Training > Dangerous and capable. Severe aggression help.

Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 23, '12 7:03am PST 
I don't think anyone is suggesting, at this point in the game, that the OP not seek professional help. I believe Asher and others are simply recommending books/articles that might help them understand the specifics a behaviorist will get into and give the OP a solid foundation in dog behavior/management to help them along. It can be easier to work with when you understand the basics.

Best of luck!
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» There has since been 32 posts. Last posting by Dogster HQ, Nov 26 11:18 am

Behavior & Training > Prey drive/reactivity and carrying something in the mouth
Jagger- **ADOPTED**

Ewok/Wookiee- Cross
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 22, '12 6:14pm PST 
I have a friend who has a GSD/Malinois cross who was reactive to other dogs. His person gives him a ball to keep track of and that has helped him immensely in his interactions with other dogs. He typically carries it around and, honestly, I haven't seen him be reactive with another dog at all!
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Smokey, Nov 24 10:31 pm

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