Postings by Jace

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Food & Nutrition > Someone 'hates' Champion Pet Foods.
Jace

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Barked: Sat Nov 9, '13 11:14am PST 
Traditionally if an animal was aging it would be put on a lower protein, as a normal protocol, as this lower protein would produce less nitrogen-a component of protein. The conclusion derived from this would be that a higher protein causes kidney issues and utilizing lowered protein is thought to be the remedy. Studies show that this is simply not the case. CANINE AND FELINE NUTRITION Case, Carey and Hirakawa 1995 states “There is no conclusive evidence showing that protein intake actually contributes to the development of kidney dysfunction in healthy animals." However, one option utilized frequently is the use of highly digestible proteins, not necessarily lower in quantity, but certainly less nitrogen producing. As an example CANINE AND FELINE NUTRITION Case, Carey and Hirakawa 1995 "In general, high-quality animal source proteins provide superior amino acid balances for companion animals, compared with the amino acid balances that are supplied by grain proteins." This works well, particularly in the case of older animals, as their ability to utilize protein decreases. As stated in NRC Wannemacher and McCoy 1996 “Older dogs appear to require somewhat more crude protein to maintain labile protein (so called protein reserves) perhaps as much as 50% more”. As this happens digestibility needs to increase through the use of exceptional protein sources .
Unless is it determined that your dog requires restricted protein due to severe kidney problem, restriction may not be required. As well, restricting will not “save” the pet’s kidneys by feeding a low protein. ." Kirk's Veterinary Therapy XIII, Small Animal Practice Finco, Brown, Barsanti and Bartges states "...restriction of protein intake does not alter the development of renal lesions nor does it preserve renal function. Considering these (research) findings, the authors do not recommend reduction of dietary protein in dogs with renal disease or reduced renal function in order to achieve renoprotective effects.” However in many cases protein could be considered “conditionally toxic” depending on the type of disease or condition.
In relation to protein as an overall “ingredient” in pet food, the type and quality should be examined as discussed earlier. Although high-quality animal sourced proteins generally contain a better, or more complete amino acid profile often times meat sources are higher in Phosphorus. The protein itself, and the Phosphorus it provides will also need to me examined, and Phosphorus reduction is often indicated in the aging pet. As well there are many protein sources that provide excellent amino acids profiles with reduced Phosphorus levels.
The same theory applies to liver issues, protein reduction is necessary based on liver panel abnormalities.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Firefly, Dec 2 7:35 am

Food & Nutrition > Any opinions on Royal Canin Anallergenic dog food for a dog with severe allergies
Jace

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Barked: Tue Aug 20, '13 4:49pm PST 
One lost 25% of her body weight and the other lost about 20%. Both dogs seemed to become much less energetic and showed other negative impacts which resulted in me taking them to their regular vet.

This can happen on any food, as calories vary. Many "prescription" type diets, are reduced in fat to fulfill a specific issue, this results in an overall calorie reduction.
I also agree with Maxwell, this food is designed for allergies, however you can look for alternatives, once the gut it healed. Give yourself a break, and take the time to do your research if you wish to use a different food. This food will give you that option.
As well, many dogs with this issue (I assumed diagnosed by biopsy) are unable to tolerate proteins that are not broken down into smaller particles, and this can be a lifelong issue depending on how severe the "scarring" is..
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Addy, CGC, Aug 22 4:06 pm


Food & Nutrition > Homemade food for a puppy? Tons of questions, really need help!

Jace

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Barked: Wed Jul 31, '13 2:44pm PST 
You might to post this is the Homemade Food and Recipes section of the forum. Interesting I was just reading this article regarding balancing home made foods from the Vet College at UC Davis http://news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=10666
Are you sure something else isn't going on like Giardia or Coccidiosis?
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Charlie, Aug 1 5:49 am


Dog Health > struvite crystals in a healthy dog.

Jace

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Barked: Tue Jun 18, '13 9:58am PST 
Yes struvite is a normal part of dog urine, and only becomes an issue if there is a blockage, or the urine is alkaline. Changing the PH by using cranberry, Berry Balance etc, wouldn't be indicated unless the PH is not correct. Maybe you can ask vet what the issue is with the struvite?
Here is a good article.
http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pet-health-information/ar ticle/animal-health/struvite-bladder-stones-in-dogs/5842
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Jace, Jun 18 9:58 am


Food & Nutrition > Feeding a dog with struvite crystals without rx food

Jace

Swiffer
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 17, '13 8:49pm PST 
Struvite is a normal component of a dogs urine, and only becomes an issue when urine PH turns Alkaline, or the stones create a blockage. Often times the way the urine is collected makes the sample appear as if there is a proliferation.
The majority of these stone issues in dogs are primarily linked to urinary tract infections (UTI), and are more prevalent in female dogs such as Cocker Spaniels, Shih Tzus, Lhasa Apsos and Pekinese, and male dogs such as German Shepherds and Bernese Mountain Dogs. Symptomatically these dogs appear with straining to urinate, blood in the urine, and frequent urination.

The struvite becomes an issue when the dog gets a urinary tract infection. This changes the Urine PH to allow the Struvite to proliferate, and possibly create a blockage.

Because struvite formation is linked to UTIs (somewhere around 90%, the rest are "sterile" struvite) and frequently a Urine Analysis does not show this, it is important to treat the suspected infection. Ideally a culture and sensitivity test must be done to ensure that the correct anti-biotic is prescribed. In many cases, due to owner reluctance or inability to finance these tests, the infection cannot be properly treated and therefore the condition may reappear. Sometimes the bacteria will also stay hidden in the bladder wall, and a culture will show up as negative.
So, if the dog has an infection, once the infection clears up, you are usually fine to return to a regular food. Many holistic vets use D Mannose as well for prevention of recurrence.

In terms of diet, it is normally recommended that dogs go on a dissolution prescription diet that has a low protein (to reduce urea), reduced calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. These minerals are what comprises the struvite stone. It also has higher sodium to increase water intake. Non-prescription foods are required to meet AAFCO requirements for nutrient levels, while prescription diets may be permitted to deviate for specific conditions. In other words non prescription diets do not meet the requirements of a dissolution diet.

Once the infection clears up, you may speak to your veterinarian about going onto a regular maintenance food, however if the infection has not been cleared up, the incidence of recurrence is high.

http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pet-health-information/art icle/animal-health/struvite-bladder-stones-in-dogs/5842
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Jace, Jun 17 8:49 pm

Food & Nutrition > Best foods for puppies with digestive issues
Jace

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Barked: Mon Jun 10, '13 6:40pm PST 
You might be best to choose the Wellness Simple to get the single, reduced protein, and less fat (this helps with the loose stools as well)
Good luck
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Max, Jun 18 7:28 am


Food & Nutrition > Best foods for puppies with digestive issues

Jace

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Barked: Mon Jun 10, '13 11:40am PST 
It's important to remember that puppies have immature digestive tracts, and proteins can leak through the gut, and this means a perfect set up for future intolerances or allergies. Your pup having "digestive issues" could simply be this, and not a full blown "intolerance". In these cases it is best to feed a diet that is limited in ingredients, easy to digest, lower fat, more moderate protein (as you have indicated) and a more easily digestible protein, like fish. I would also recommend using L glutamine, an amino acid, as this helps the digestive tract.
Have you tried a limited ingredient diet food such as Wellness, Petcurean (the Sensitivity + Shine)or Natural Balance?
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Max, Jun 18 7:28 am


Food & Nutrition > Suggestions of new food?!

Jace

Swiffer
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 7, '13 11:21am PST 
If this food is working and a switch will cause you stress, why not buy 2 bags at one time, so that you are always ahead by one bag?
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by Hank, Jun 28 1:32 pm


Food & Nutrition > grain free/potato free food?

Jace

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Barked: Fri Jun 7, '13 9:00am PST 
Petcurean has a new potato and grain free food http://www.petcurean.com/for-dogs/go/sensitivity-and-shine-grain-fre e-potato-free-turkey It uses turkey as a protein source, if you wanted to limit sources.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Cookie, Jun 20 7:04 pm

Grooming > should I get paid to groom a sample dog for a job?
Jace

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Barked: Tue Apr 30, '13 9:13pm PST 
I guess it would depend on whether the three dogs were all different types of clips,ie teddy bear, scissor etc. In the past I have seen this to be a common job prerequisite, so I guess I would chalk it up to the overall money you will make once you get the job smile
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Babe, Oct 5 7:42 pm

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