Postings by Lady

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Behavior & Training > Training an independent dog?

Lady

Being beautiful- is a survival- skill.
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 28, '12 12:57pm PST 
By forceful I mean verbally. If I ever raised my voice to my Aussie, he was crushed. He would curl up like he'd be hit with a stick if anyone yelled at him (my boss has been known to sometimes yell at his computer, and he learned to never get too loud around the Aussie).

With Lady, I have to raise my voice just to get her to listen when she's distracted. If she takes off after a bicycle or something, then it takes a serious shout to get her to stop. Even when she's not distracted, she tends to blow me off if I tell her to do something quietly. Using a stern voice will get her to follow a command rather than consider it a suggestion. But I'm not happy with this, as I dislike having to raise my voice to her (although she never seems to get her feelings hurt about it).
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Lobo, Aug 29 8:27 pm

Behavior & Training > Training an independent dog?
Lady

Being beautiful- is a survival- skill.
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 28, '12 7:55am PST 
You may be right about her not getting enough exercise. I've tried playing fetch with her. She love to chase stuff, but once she gets hold of a stick or ball, she wants to turn the game into "Catch me if you can" rather than bringing it back for me to throw again. I need to get her to return and release rather than just run off with it.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Lobo, Aug 29 8:27 pm


Behavior & Training > Training an independent dog?

Lady

Being beautiful- is a survival- skill.
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 27, '12 8:53pm PST 
Lady actually behaves pretty well at the office. She loves to get petted by the customers, but whenever she barked or got too rambunctiousness she got sent back to the office. She has learned that she can only come out for attention if she minds her manners. She actually minds better on the sales floor than she does in back room.

However, the moment we go outside the store she immediately starts barking and bouncing around like she just drank a double espresso. The commands that she follows indoors are completely forgotten in the excitement of sniffing, barking and wanting to chase bicycles. Indoors, she will quietly walk up to customers to be petted. Outdoors, she races up to people for attention, but then usually won't hold still long enough to let anyone pet her.

I'm going to order that "When Pigs Fly" in the morning (fortunately, Lady and I work in a bookstore). It sounds like it may what I've been looking for.

I'll have to give a little thought to a reward for her. She gets so wound up that she won't eat food outside (I've tried giving her leftovers when I come out of a restaurant and she won't eat them in the truck - once I get her home she'll beg for same food, but not while other stuff is going on). Maybe beef jerky?

Thanks for the book suggestion and encouragement.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Lobo, Aug 29 8:27 pm


Behavior & Training > Training an independent dog?

Lady

Being beautiful- is a survival- skill.
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 27, '12 11:44am PST 
First off, I really grew up as a cat person. Although I did teach one especially compliant cat to walk on a leash, you generally work out agreements with cats rather than training them kitty

My first dog was an Australian Shepherd who was basically a rescue case. I got him at 9 months old and was told that he had simply never been picked up as a puppy and needed to be socialized. He trusted me from the beginning, but was completely terrified of everyone else (I've always suspected that he was abused by his first owner and then returned to the breeder who didn't tell me about that). 

I stated taking him to work with me just to get him around other people. It took years before he would really trust the other employees, and he never completely got over his abuse or developed the confidence that he should have had. 

Training the Aussie required extreme gentleness. But he was eager to please and literally half of his many commands were things that he simply figured out on his own. The big hurdle was getting him to feel safe, after that he would instantly follow the slightest hand signal or quietest verbal command. 

After my Aussie died, my second dog is a Rough Collie who is mostly the opposite of my Aussie. She almost got overly-socialized and will run up up to anyone and beg to be petted (her "job" is being the office mascot, so she has been taught to do this). Where my Aussie would spend 90% of his time looking at me and trying to figure out what I wanted him to do, the Collie is Little Miss Independent. She's every bit as smart as the Aussie, but wants to decide for herself whether to follow commands. Although I have (mostly) succeeded in teaching her proper manners indoors, many commands outdoors take 2 or 3 tries before she calms down enough to listen. She is 5 1/2 years old, and is just now calming down (my neighbor's Border Collie is less hyper than she is). 

I originally tried to treat her like my Aussie, but quickly learned she needs a much firmer leadership. Quietly asking her to do something just gets me ignored. I don't believe she's bring willful or stubborn, it's more that she considers her own ideas every bit as good as my commands. So Stay Down means stay until she decides it's time to get up. Telling my Aussie Don't Jump meant don't jump on anybody. With the Collie it's "You told me I couldn't jump on that person yesterday, you never said I couldn't jump on this person today." 

Partly I think my own quiet personality may have been a better natural match for the Aussie, and I've had to learn to be more forceful with the Collie. Partly it's that Aussies were apparently bred to work closely with their handlers, whereas Collies were bred to work independently. Anyway, I'm wondering if I used to have an exceptionally trainable Aussie, or if I now have an overly hyper and somewhat ADD Collie?
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» There has since been 16 posts. Last posting by Lobo, Aug 29 8:27 pm


Behavior & Training > Anti-Barking

Lady

Being beautiful- is a survival- skill.
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 27, '12 11:29am PST 
The first day I took Lady to the office, she almost barked herself out of a job (as company mascot). I finally got a spray bottle, filled it with water and just a bit of vinegar and then had some "Anti-Bark Spray." When she would start barking, a quick spray across her nose would interrupt her. I would then quickly praise her for being quiet as soon as she stopped. After only 2 or 3 squirts, I could just pick up the bottle and show it to her when she started being noisy, and she would immediately quiet down.

Take care not to spray the dog in the face, or use a steam of water that could splash in his eyes. You just need to spray a fine mist in front of the dogs nose. The smell of the vinegar will do the job, not soaking the dog with water.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Zoey, Aug 30 6:29 pm

Behavior & Training > Does anyone else's dog hate rain?
Lady

Being beautiful- is a survival- skill.
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 27, '12 11:00am PST 
Lady doesn't care about getting rained on. But she has learned that I don't like to take her out when it's pouring, so she will refrain from even asking to go out if she hears it raining outside. If I go to bed during a storm, she will wake me up for her walk as soon as it stops raining. dog walk After my steering her around several mud puddles, she quickly learned to walk around puddles on her own.

Snow, however, is a different matter. We only get snow here every few years, but as soon as she figures out it's snowing, she HAS to go for a walk every 15 minutes!
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Augusta, CGC, RN, Sep 9 3:48 pm


Collie > Need help introducing adopted collie to our cat.

Lady

Being beautiful- is a survival- skill.
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 27, '12 10:12am PST 
I brought my 3 month old Collie home when my cat was 6 months old, so they grew up together. I got one hiss out of the cat when he first saw the dog, but in a few days the cat, Fluffy, got used to this barking little puppy (Lady). By the end of the week, they were playing together. They used to chase each other around the house, get up on the bed and wrestle with each other, etc. The cat was always careful to keep his claws in, and the puppy would nip at the cat but was careful to never bite down.

After Fluffy grew up and calmed down, Lady was still bouncing around like a puppy. She would often try to pester Fluffy. Occasionally Lady would succeed in getting Fluffy to get up and move. Mostly, Fluffy would just completely ignore his "little sister".

An adult cat would likely take a bit longer to adjust to a dog, but Collies usually get along with cats and learn to respect whatever boundaries the cat sets.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Lady, Aug 27 10:12 am


Collie > Training an independent Collie

Lady

Being beautiful- is a survival- skill.
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 26, '12 9:34am PST 
First off, I really grew up as a cat person. Although I did teach one especially compliant cat to walk on a leash, you generally work out agreements with cats rather than training them kitty

My first dog was an Australian Shepherd who was basically a rescue case. I got him at 9 months old and was told that he had simply never been picked up as a puppy and needed to be socialised. He trusted me from the beginning, but was completely terrified of everyone else (I've always suspected that he was abused by his first owner and then returned to the breeder who didn't tell me about that).

I stated taking him to work with me just to get him around other people. It took years before he would really trust the other employees, and he never completely got over his abuse or developed the confidence that he should have had.

Training the Aussie required extreme gentleness. But he was eager to please and literally half of his many commands were things that he simply figured out on his own. The big hurdle was getting him to feel safe, after that he would instantly follow the slightest hand signal or quietest verbal command.

My second dog is a Rough Collie, who is mostly the opposite of my Aussie. She almost got overly-socialized and will run up up to anyone and beg to be petted (her 'job' is being the office mascot, so she has been taught to do this). Where my Aussie would spend 90% of his time looking at me and trying to figure out what I wanted him to do, the Collie is Little Miss Independent. She's every bit as smart as the Aussie, but wants to decide for herself whether to follow commands. Although I have (mostly) succeeded in teaching her proper manners indoors, many commands outdoors take 2 or 3 tries before she calms down enough to listen. She is 5 1/2 years old, and is just now calming down (my neighbor's Border Collie is less hyper than she is).

I originally tried to treat her like my Aussie, but quickly learned she needs a much firmer leadership. Quietly asking her to do something just gets me ignored. I don't believe she's bring willful or stubborn, it's more that she considers her own ideas every bit as good as my commands. So Stay means stay until she decides it's time to get up. Telling my Aussie Don't Jump meant don't jump on anybody. With the Collie it's "You told me I couldn't jump on that person yesterday, you never said I couldn't jump on this person today."

Partly I think my own quiet personality may have been a better natural match for the Aussie, and I've had to learn to be more forceful with the Collie. Partly it's that Aussies were apparently bred to work closely with their handlers, whereas Collies were bred to work independently. Anyway, I'm wondering if I got an exceptionally trainable Aussie, or if I now have an overly hyper and somewhat ADD Collie?
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Sep 3 8:16 pm


Behavior & Training > What Breeds are you Afraid of?

Lady

Being beautiful- is a survival- skill.
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 22, '12 10:09am PST 
I realize this is the opposite of the question, but I have a Rough Collie with the classic Lassie colors. She is extremely friendly and will run up to anyone and beg to be petted. On several occasions I've had little kids who were a bit leery of "the big doggy" and literally seen their mothers drag the kid up to my Collie "Look, honey, it's a Lassie dog, they're friendly!".

Some people are obviously judging the potential danger of various breeds from personal experience. But I wonder how many people judge dogs by how various breeds are seen on TV, or reported in newspapers?
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Aug 22 7:07 pm

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