Postings by Rolo

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Choosing the Right Dog > Stunning dog, but red Labradors?
Rolo

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Barked: Thu Aug 22, '13 10:07am PST 
I love fox reds, too. That is some interesting information and some pretty photos you all put up. Of course you all know I like red dogs, based on Dr. Watson, and you can see that my rescue Rolo is even redder. He's a Toller/GR mix. My next dog will be a reddish fieldie GR. My previous 2 Goldens were reddish, too, but Watt is the darkest.

I just love red animals. I have some reddish Shetland sheep. I want a pair of Scottish Highland cows, and a chestnut Icelandic horse. Guess I'm a little crazy. laugh out loud
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Rolo, Aug 22 10:07 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Probably getting a toller?
Rolo

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Barked: Tue Jul 9, '13 9:11am PST 
I have a Toller/Golden Retriever mix. While he's not typical of the breed, I know a bit about Tollers.

Yes, he will be attracted to the bird and to small prey, so keep them safe.

Tollers scream more than bark. It's a very weird sound. Look it up on a youtube vid under "Toller scream" to get an idea.

Tollers need a LOT of exercise. They are now bred to be a "versatile" hunting dog more than anything else. Part of that means that they can run miles and miles. They are also a bit more sharpish than Golden Retrievers in temperament.

They are lovely dogs, though. Expect them to want to chew everything as pups, but they should have a very soft mouth.

Enjoy! big grin
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Rolo, Jul 9 9:11 am


Behavior & Training > At what age does DA and SSA crop up/when will you know if it will crop up

Rolo

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Barked: Wed Jun 26, '13 9:36am PST 
I'd definitely avoid those dogs with a tendency to DA and SSA. It does tend to crop up at adolescence and maturity. Having a dog with some DA, I've found is one of the most difficult things to deal with, even though he is better now. It's definitely better to have an extensively fostered dog. My last dog was not extensively fostered, but he was a mix of two breeds not known for DA (Toller and Golden) and was tested both with submissive and aggressive dogs and did not react to either. This was an absolute necessity for me. And my DA dog did fine with him, as he is not DA toward the household dogs, just outside dogs.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Jun 28 4:30 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > What does it take to foster?

Rolo

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Barked: Mon Feb 18, '13 10:11am PST 
Don't be me! I foster failed on my first foster! I fell in love at first sight and so did he! His smile did me in, and his need for a mommy! Out of my 3 dogs, I finally needed a dog ALL MY OWN!cloud 9

I did have the shelter dog test him with both aggressive and submissive dogs first, which I think really helped. He is completely non-reactive to other dogs, and my pack is not the most open-pawed, but he had no problems here. They didn't know he feared tall, thin men, but I figure most of the shelter workers must have been women. We have been working through this with a good deal of success.
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» There has since been 21 posts. Last posting by Misty, Mar 6 4:49 pm


Behavior & Training > When do dog to dog corrections become bullying type behaviours?

Rolo

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Barked: Sat Feb 2, '13 12:59pm PST 
Still addressing the violence issues. I too, use verbal interruptors, which I don't think makes me a violent person. And the mildest of all with my timid dog -- isn't teaching 'leave it' an interruptor after all? thinking

An example is the timid rescue I brought into my home recently, Rolo the Toller mix. He was afraid of men, household noises, doors, etc., but not other dogs. He has excellent dog manners. One hump onto him, and there was a loud growl, 2 air snaps, and he wasn't humped again. I don't consider that a violent correction. I don't consider that there is a more peaceful solution to this. This is a dog's solution, a solution effective in the world of dogs. Of course any more than this, and you break it up.

This has nothing to do with positive training, clicker training, marker training, drive training, balanced training, etc. It's common sense if you believe in social learning in dogs.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by , Feb 3 2:33 pm

Behavior & Training > Update on Rolo Playing with Me
Rolo

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Barked: Sat Feb 2, '13 10:06am PST 
Hi all! wave Thanks for the support! It means a lot for me, this has been something strange for me, too, Squ'mey. My other dogs, all my life, and that makes 8, have all played with me naturally. Many have been actually nuts about it. I believe Rolo had very little human interaction before I rescued him.

I really can tell the boy wants to play from his body language, and we are coming along. We have about 3 play sessions a day, and he plays a little with other dogs in the park once a day. He has an excellent play bow! The squeaky really revs him up, lol. He is tugging very slightly harder now!

I am thinking of building a flirt pole when the weather is better, -- it's been running around 10 degrees now, a little cold to play a long time for me, not for him. One thing he really does like to do is run between two people. We have used this for recall training. He will go to one person, then "Come to mommy!" When he comes to mommy, he runs flat out, then slides into home base!

I found an interesting study going on: Dog and Human Play! At Horowitz's Dog Cognition Lab. You videotype your play with your dog and send it to them. I think this would be great to do with my dogs, esp. since we interact differently with each one. And once I get Rolo playing more, I may make a vid of him and me. smile

Perhaps they will be looking for the "play circuit" in the brain and what neurotransmitters it involves!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Rolo, Feb 2 10:06 am


Puppy Place > What is the strangest breed you've been mistaken for?

Rolo

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Barked: Wed Jan 30, '13 3:21pm PST 
Irish Setter -- I'm a Toller / Golden Mix
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Behavior & Training > Update on Rolo Playing with Me

Rolo

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Barked: Tue Jan 29, '13 1:16pm PST 
Ah, on reviewing the body language of play (I'm always concentrating on 'bad' body language, I suppose), I found that the wider, open mouth display is a sign of playfulness among canines. thinking
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Rolo, Feb 2 10:06 am


Behavior & Training > Update on Rolo Playing with Me

Rolo

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Barked: Tue Jan 29, '13 12:16pm PST 
First I want to thank everyone for their suggestions and techniques. I have not tried all of them yet, but I have had success with a few and a few of my own. smile

Rolo was given a plain, soft box to tear up -- a diet Coke carton. He enjoyed this and went through a couple of them. laugh out loud

I always wait to play with Rolo until he seems bright-eyed, waggy, and excited, bouncing around a little. One interesting thing he does is open his mouth wider when he wants to play. thinking

We continued to interact with the tug. I bought a soft sqeakie since he is so soft-mouthed. I squeak it to get him excited and amped up. He will take it in his mouth, but drop it without squeaking it, so I squeak it above his head some more. Then I put it up and play one of two games with him.

The first is playing with the rope tug. I will zig zag the fringy ends across the floor and he will paw at them and grab at them with his mouth. I will also life it higher than his mouth and he will jump up a little and reach toward the knot end, which he likes to get in his mouth. A new game is "floss the teeth" in which I rub the tug bag and forth in his mouth at a moderate speed and he tries and sometimes succeeds in catching the knot end. He is now offering slight resistance in tug. I let him win about 75% of the time. He also likes to grab for the end of a tennis bone (the knob part).

Another game I found to play is to get him amped up with the squeaker toy, then grab his feet. Sometimes he wants all four grabbed, sometimes he just wants me to play patty-cake on the floor with his front feet. I was absolutely thrilled when he let out little playful growls -- he has never done that before.

Whenever he seems playful, we have a very short play session, perhaps just a minute, and I always leave him wanting more.

I have not tried using food to reward him for playing. He seems to be getting excited without it. I don't know what play circuit I have engaged in his brain, but Rolo seems happy about it, and so am I! big grin
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Rolo, Feb 2 10:06 am

Sports & Agility > Does Anyone Compete With a Rescued Dog?
Rolo

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Barked: Tue Jan 29, '13 10:59am PST 
I haven't done anything with my rescues yet, but I plan to get Kado herding lessons after she has another TTA. She has a very good instinct for sheep -- she's a Cattle Dog mix -- and she would be great at Barn Hunts if we had them up here in the Northeast, but they are basically a southern thing.

With Rolo, I intend to do basic OB and then move into some light agility for confidence building. I don't think he will ever be particularly fast, as he runs sort of crabby (he had a broken leg at some point in his past) -- we will see which he likes. Maybe we will want to compete in one or the other. He already has a 3 minute stay down, with only praise for a reward. He seems to be quite clever, and really coming out of his shell from the very timid dog he was when he came here to be fostered from SC. (Can we all say foster failure!!!)
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» There has since been 40 posts. Last posting by Dennis FDCH-S, TFIII, Jan 10 6:00 pm

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