Postings by Ember FDX

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Raw Food Diet > 10 week old Dalmatian raw diet question
Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 14, '14 5:39am PST 
I believe Dals can eat raw, but it needs to be modified. Something to do with less organ meats and more fiber/veg. I know there have been threads on it here in the past.

Forum Search for "Dalmatian Raw Diet
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Ember FDX, Mon 5:39 am

Raw Food Diet > Somewhat new to BARF
Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 14, '14 5:18am PST 
BARF and prey model really are not that different. If someone told you a BARF diet is comprised of chicken frames and liver and maybe veggies and you're good, they were wrong. There are some differences between the ideologies, but at the end of the day you're feeding the same stuff because both diets need to meet the same nutritional profile.

Organs and such are basic math: If your Husky is getting 12oz daily and the diet should be about 5% liver, she should be eating around .6oz of that as liver daily, OR 4.2oz of that as liver weekly.

If your Husky mix is eating double that, he should be getting about double the liver. (24oz daily with 1.2oz of that being liver, OR 8.4oz of liver weekly)

Remember both counts are generalizations that you will alter based on the rest of the diet you put together.

Chicken thighs have a lot more meat than frames, but the bonemeditateeat ratio is still too high for an overall diet. And it's still chicken. Adding red meat to thighs with organs as needed could work. Boneless thighs would be fine for adding extra meat, although in my experience you can get cheap beef or pork for the same or less than deboned chicken.

Some people with dogs as large as yours find chicken thighs do not work because they're so small the dogs try to swallow them whole. Certainly try them - if your dogs are used to frames, they may have no issue chewing - but I wouldn't buy dozens until you're sure it will work. Turkey thighs are much larger (but still have the same high bonemeditateeat ratio).
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Obi, Tue 9:32 am


Raw Food Diet > Somewhat new to BARF

Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 13, '14 7:25pm PST 
As mentioned, turkey necks are mostly bone as well. My dogs don't do well on chicken, so the vast majority of bone in their diet comes from turkey. But they're getting something like 4oz of neck with 8oz of pork or beef plus veg mix, interspersed with low-bone days of about 2.5oz fish with 9.5oz pork or beef with veg mix (organs included as needed).

Turkey is different, but it's still white meat. Dogs must have a significant portion of red meat in a raw diet (or be on a highly customized diet that wouldn't resemble any of the generalized diets discussed here).

A roasting chicken is a great idea - better yet, stuff it with beef or pork to compensate for the high bone content. Roasters, being gutted, are still high in bone. Some say they are high in bone even when stuffed, because dogs are meant to be eating red meat from large animals and would not be able to consume the entire carcass, thus lowering bone content even further.

Lamb, goat, buffalo and kangaroo are perfectly viable options as well, but in the US they tend to be difficult to find at an affordable price. If you can, go for it.

I agree that if chicken frames and necks are the only items you can get, you are better off sticking with commercial diets. You could occasionally add a chicken frame or turkey neck as a treat in addition to a commercial diet, but you can not build a suitable diet off these things.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Obi, Tue 9:32 am


Food & Nutrition > My Shih Tzu won't eat

Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 13, '14 12:08pm PST 
If it is a physical problem, it will not be obvious at a general exam. You would need to be running lab work and possibly doing ultrasounds and such, depending on what is suspected. I'm thinking problems like liver shunt, here.

Don't leave food out indefinitely. 15 min per meal. In addition to being at risk for bacterial growth, food that left out all the time can be taken for granted. Why would I sit down for a full meal if I have access to a buffet any time I want it? 15 min per meal, then the food goes away. You can offer 5 meals a day if that works, but the food has to go away in between. The food can not change in between meals (ie: go away after lunch, then reappear for dinner covered in grated cheese) or you'll teach her to hold out for the possibility of something better next time. I encourage offering something different after she finishes her current meal completely, to keep her interested.

Dogs can starve themselves. I have seen it. A healthy dog should not starve herself, which is why I mention running tests. Even then, some healthy dogs will hold out so long they get sick, and then can not eat. Small dogs in particular are prone to hypoglycemia. So use the things she does like, offer small, meal-sized portions at a time (if she overeats at breakfast, she's not very likely to want dinner), and rotate though what she likes as she cleans her plate.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Willow, Mon 6:35 pm


Raw Food Diet > Somewhat new to BARF

Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 13, '14 11:51am PST 
You must expand the variety of their diet, and alter your ratios. Chicken alone, even if it a fresh, whole chicken, head, guts and all, cannot provide a complete diet for a dog.

Frames, by definition, are what's left of an animal after it has been cleaned and all the desirable cuts of meat have been removed. They are nice to add bone to a diet, but that's about all they're good for. Bone should only be about 10% of the diet, so feeding exclusively frames from any animal can cause big, big problems.

Chicken liver is good, but beef liver is generally considered better, being dramatically higher in copper, B vitamins and vitamin A. 6oz of liver a week should be plenty for your Husky (maybe too much, if you do switch types of liver), but since you're feeding your Husky mix twice as many frames without upping the liver intake, he's coming up short. Liver should be about 5% of their diet.

About 5% of their diet should be secreting organs other than liver. Kidneys, pancreas, thymus, and spleen are what most people are able to find.

You need more meat. About 80% of the diet should be just meat, exclusive of bone. Most people aim to use about 50% red meat in their diet, although this depends on what exactly your diet looks like. Different meats have different nutrient profiles.

There is a shifty "other" category that contains items like heart, lungs, tongue and unclean stomach. Things that aren't really meat, and aren't really organs either. I aim to keep such items around 15% of the diet, and that 15% comes out of the meaty meat portion. None of them are vital components of the diet, so you can get by without them, but you can overdo them - and people tend to overdo them, because they're usually very cheap. Again, exactly how you work this out depends on your diet as a whole.

Most people here do not feed veggies. I have found them to be a good thing. I balance my dog's meat portions out, then throw a tablespoon or two of something fibrous mixed with something green on top. Their stools are far more regular this way, the things like beans and squashes help them hold weight without adding obscene amounts of fat to their diet (my dogs are extremely active) and there may be benefit from greens and berries. Certainly short of allergy, they are not causing harm in such limited amounts, so why not?

Unless you end up feeding mostly wild game, you will need a source of omega3s too. I currently get whole, flash-frozen sardines and mackerel from the seafood freezers in the grocery store. Some feed canned fishes. Some add fish oil supplements and vitamin E (which is balanced out in fish meat, but not in oil alone).

If you've been feeding exclusively very boney chicken for months, you're going to want to introduce change fairly slowly. I'd start by adding boneless chicken, and getting them used to a better meat:bone ratio first. Then branch out to other types of meats and organs. Fiber will help keep their stools regular, if you do want to add veggies short or long term.
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Obi, Tue 9:32 am

Food & Nutrition > My Shih Tzu won't eat
Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 11, '14 6:04pm PST 
First, is she underweight? The number one problem I see with picky small dogs, is that the owner expects them to be taking in more calories than they actually need. The dog is self-regulating, and since food is abundant in wide variety, the dog starts picking and choosing only what she likes best to eat.

If that's the case, measure how much she is actually eating and cut back to that.

If it's not, and you're struggling to keep her weight up, look to medical causes first. Some healthy dogs are so picky about food that they will keep themselves chronically underweight. Usually that becomes a matter of finding several foods the do enjoy, and rotating through them so they don't get bored.

FWIW, there's a good chance she got tired of liver and rice because liver contains a lot of fat-soluble vitamins that it is possible to overdose on. My dogs eat raw food, and only get 5% liver in their diets. I balance their diet over time, rather than feeding exact amounts each day, and I have noticed that I must spread liver out or they'll stop eating it. They'll love it at first, but they will not eat more than they need.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Willow, Mon 6:35 pm


Food & Nutrition > Mars Buys Out P&G Pet Foods (Iams, Euk, Natura)

Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 10, '14 1:37pm PST 
Mars buys Iams, Eukanuba and Natura Brands

"MCLEAN, Va. & CINCINNATI–(BUSINESS WIRE)–MCLEAN, Va. & CINCINNATI–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Mars, Incorporated and The Procter & Gamble Company (NYSEpartyG) today announce that Mars has agreed to buy the IAMS®, EUKANUBA®, and NATURA® brands in major markets for US$2.9 Billion in cash. This is a significant strategic move for Mars Petcare to complement its large and growing global Petcare business.

The companies expect to complete the transaction in the second-half of 2014, subject to regulatory approvals.

Mars Petcare is one of the world’s leading pet food and veterinary care providers and employs more than 35,000 Associates across 50 countries. Upon completion of the transaction, IAMS®, EUKANUBA®, and NATURA® brands will join Mars Petcare’s billion dollar stable mates PEDIGREE®, WHISKAS®, BANFIELD®, and ROYAL CANIN®.

Mars Petcare Global President, Todd Lachman, said: “We view the addition of the IAMS®, EUKANUBA®, and NATURA® brands as exceptionally strategic. This acquisition is a perfect fit with our Mars Petcare vision of making A BETTER WORLD FOR PETS™. The deal reinforces our leadership in pet nutrition and veterinary science, attracts world class talent and grows our world leading portfolio.
"

thinking

I'm not sure being owned by Mars is any worse than being owned by P&G. I don't know what I think of Mars and Nestle being the only major players in mainstream pet food.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Ember FDX, Apr 10 1:37 pm


Sports & Agility > Harness Help

Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 9, '14 11:57am PST 
This is what is typically referred to as a step-in harness. Are you using something different? I have not used the Hurtta, but the Guard/Distance is different than a step-in harness.

A non-adjustable neck strap makes a huge difference, or so I've found. If you put pressure on an adjustable piece of nylon for hours, it loosens. Then the harness slips up too far and before long the dog is choking. On that note, proper fit is everything. A lot of mass produced harnesses (for Petco, etc) are made with too dramatic differences between sizes and so they only actually fit a small number of dogs. They also tend to be made for very tiny, or Lab-sized, overweight dogs.

A wide chest plate is not necessary for pulling. If anything, that's going to rub armpits and throw a dog's gait off. As long as the straps are thick, and placed to distribute weight, it shouldn't be an issue. The straps on the guard/distance are 1 1/8" nylon against padding that brings the neck to about 2", the chest and back to about 1 1/2". I don't have the harness with me right now, so I don't have exact measurements. The padding is firm enough to distribute weight, unlike many harnesses that use materials like fleece as padding - which does prevent the nylon from rubbing but serves little purpose otherwise. And it's held together with metal O rings, which allows it to move with your dog, rather than your dog moving around it.

I've been using it for several months now, and I haven't had any issues with choking, rubbing or impeded movement. Recently another member of our flyball team purchased one for her very intense, still-in-training dog, who has scarring from improperly treated kennel cough. He's only a few weeks in, but has been doing great with it so far.

You can add a belly strap to an x-back for escape artists, so that's not such an issue. It's more that the harness would need to be pulled on to really work correctly.

I have a Ruffwear Webmaster for both of my dogs. In my experience, about 50% of dogs hate wearing them. There's too much coverage over the back, and they just don't like moving under it. You can work with this hiking or something, but when you're doing flyball or agility where you're both under pressure and really need your dog to be as comfortable as possible to get the best performance, it just does not work.

The Webmaster is fully adjustable, but it does stay where adjusted to fairly well. They are the same basic set up in front as the guard/distance harness... It looks different, but it is hitting all the same points on the dog. It does not stay in place well when a dog pulls - the back tends to lift up off the dog and crease in the middle, unless you are using the nylon loop on the back for the leash, which I frankly am not comfortable with. It does not look sturdy enough for a puller, and a friend of mine did have that loop come unstitched on her dog's Webmaster (which Ruffwear was great about and immediately replaced under their warranty). Mostly I used them as mobility aids for old or injured dogs.

I have not used the linked to harness, but I am not a fan of that style harness. It seems to restrict forward motion in the front legs, and on that specific harness also firmly covers the shoulder blades. That particular one has more chest padding than I would like, too.

Yes, many people do stick to slip leads for agility. There's no problem doing so, as long as your dog isn't going to choke himself on the way up to the ring.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Fun On The Run Kennel Racing, Wed 10:37 am


Choosing the Right Dog > I have no idea what to do with him!recently adopted,might return HELP!!!

Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 8, '14 10:10am PST 
Yup. That's a Husky. I'm kinda surprised you did breed research with intent to get a Husky and are caught off-guard by all this.

He needs more exercise than he's getting. Being quiet in a shelter is usually indicative of stress and shut down. He's out now, he's feeling better, and he needs to run.

Once he's well exercised, the attention-seeking should subside. In the meantime, as you have discovered, "scolding" a dog for attention-seeking most often completely backfires. He's looking for attention, and you're giving it to him. Since it's negative attention, he's coming back with his own snark.

Instead, if he is being inappropriate, he looses you. Either you leave and ignore him for 3-5 min, or he goes in a dog-safe room or very sturdy crate for 3-5 min, until he's settled down. Then try again.

Having a safe place for him to stay when he's not supervised will also keep him from destroying your house. If he's obsessed with a certain piece of furniture, he should lose access to it for now. Get him on a solid exercise program, get some basic training in him, and slowly let him prove he can have his freedom in the house.

Make sure he has plenty of good things to chew on, too. Good by his standards, not yours. Antlers, bully sticks, raw meaty bones, or toys you've stuffed with food like West Paw's Tux, or Kong toys. Many dogs have a psychological need to chew to consume that can only be quelled by items like these. A stressed dog may feel this even stronger, since chewing relieves stress.

As to the yard, exercise will help here too. If he's tired and happy, he doesn't have as much reason to leave. Still, if you can improve your fencing, do. Otherwise use the line. There's nothing wrong with using lines, so long as you're supervising and the dog is getting adequate exercise.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Caledonia, Apr 9 4:47 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > HELP! DNR/DNT... this woman needs to be exposed!
Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 8, '14 9:39am PST 
Depends on how much you want to put into taking this woman down.

The easiest thing to do is alert the rescue she was transporting for to what happened and let them take it from there.

Of course, some rescues are glorified mills, so they may already know and not care either way.

If you want to do this yourself, you're going to need to know where she lives. Involve the authorities in that area as a potential hoarding case. Collect any evidence you can of unsanitary conditions animals are being kept in. Even more important will be evidence that she is misrepresenting herself as a charitable organization. Those will be your only legal points - unfortunately vicariously breeding animals and being careless in handling them is not illegal.

You could call the police for DUI, although if she ends up busted for drugs and hauled off to jail, things could go very poorly for her animals.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Kali, Apr 8 5:10 pm

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