Postings by BRT

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Choosing the Right Dog > I want a large breed to do Therapy Work - help!
BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '14 12:23pm PST 
"... I just went and met with two adult Bouviers. Wow. I think I'm in love Wonderful dogs, seem to have just the temperament I like ..."

"... I am trying to find a breeder of Bouviers with dogs that aren't too drivey. I want a steady, even tempered pup ..."




At the risk of stating the obvious:

Have you checked out from whence those two adult Bouviers
(with whom you think you were in love) came? ...thinking...
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Mar 5 11:38 am

Choosing the Right Dog > I want a large breed to do Therapy Work - help!
BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 28, '14 7:22pm PST 
"... This is certainly a breed where finding the right breeder is essential..."




Having had Bouviers for 20 years, and having had our kids grow up with them, I think the Bouv is, 'potentially.' an excellent choice. way to go It may or may not be the best choice, or even a good choice, for the O.P., but this is truly a wonderful breed!

Having said that, I would whole-heartedly agree with Selli's comment above. Although "finding the right breeder is essential" with any breed, it is especially important when considering any "guardian-type" breed.
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Mar 5 11:38 am


Choosing the Right Dog > I want a large breed to do Therapy Work - help!

BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 14, '14 5:39am PST 
If you like the Bullmastiff, I know of a Dogue de Bordeaux breeder who is (very!) heavily involved in therapy work with her dog(ue)s.
Of course, I mention this with no idea whether or not a Dogue (or Bouvier) would be a good match for you.
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» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by , Mar 5 11:38 am


Choosing the Right Dog > I want a large breed to do Therapy Work - help!

BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 12, '14 2:01pm PST 
You're absolutely right in that,
"... speaking to breeders, each of them claims their dogs are "exceptionally smart, calm, easy to train, and great with kids ..."

I've made no secret of the fact that (IMO) the overwhelming majority of breeders is less than wonderful. It's gr8 that you've managed to find only the "good ones". laugh out loud

I'm on the road on business right now, so it's hard to find time to post here. As it seems that this site will self-destruct shortly, if you want to contact me, I'm "Mina" on chazhound.com ...

On the other hand, there is no shortage of advice to be found on these dog forums - most of it worth every penny spent.
wave
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» There has since been 20 posts. Last posting by , Mar 5 11:38 am


Choosing the Right Dog > I want a large breed to do Therapy Work - help!

BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 10, '14 6:23pm PST 
"... I am so surprised to hear you say that your bouviers had little to no doggy smell, as I have read time and again that they can be very smelly dogs ..."

Reading about a breed, even extensively, and the reality, are often quite dissimilar. shrug
Therapy dogs are expected to be fairly clean. A clean Bouvier is not at all smelly. However, that coat, especially if kept long, can collect a lot "stuff" and, as would be expected, can get quite stinky if not kept up properly.


"... I've already found that EVERYONE talks a good game. "

Welcome to the dog world:
Every breed is "perfect".
Every breeder is "wonderful".
Every dog is "brilliant". big laugh

Picking (finding!?!) a good breeder can be a real quest!
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» There has since been 22 posts. Last posting by , Mar 5 11:38 am

Choosing the Right Dog > I want a large breed to do Therapy Work - help!
BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 7, '14 7:07am PST 
There are (quite) a number of potential breeds which immediately come to mind. I'll comment solely on the Bouvier, as our children were raised with Bouv's, and we've had 20 years experience with the breed.

We chose our puppies, raised and trained them with care. Our dogs (from different breeders/lines) were exactly as you described:
- "large"
- "calm and steady in nature"
- "without too vigorous exercise requirements"
- "daily walks and occasional trips to the park are what I can commit to"
- "trustworthy in my busy home with 3 young children and friends coming and going"
- "*looked* intimidating."

They were temperamentally rock solid, bomb-proof, and would have made exceptional therapy dogs. As a bonus, there was little or no "doggy odour", and shedding was minimal. I should also comment that each was extremely fast, agile and athletic, and could work for hours on end; however, they were also quite content to vegetate and watch T.V.
"Daily walks and occasional trips to the park" would have been quite fine ... prolonged separation from family would not!

The reality is that, with the huge spectrum of temperament, personality and drives within each breed, choice of breeder will be more important than choice of breed. Also, assuming you're looking at a puppy, your raising, training and socializing will have much to do in the eventual makeup of your dog.

Best of luck in your search!
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» There has since been 28 posts. Last posting by , Mar 5 11:38 am


Choosing the Right Dog > papered or Unpapered? canadain kennel club

BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 19, '13 4:01pm PST 
There are lots (and lots and lots and lots) of Poodle breeders, especially here in Ontario. The overwhelming majority are mediocre at best. Papers aside, it's hard enough finding a good breeder. I know of no good Canadian breeder, of any CKC recognized breed, who will not, automatically, give you the appropriate papers. It's a given.

Having said that, there are many puppy mills, pet shops, poor breeders and "backyard" breeders who will also offer papers. Paper work is no guarantee of quality. I know of (mediocre) breeders who "fudge" their own, so that in some cases, those papers are not even a guarantee of pedigree.

Forget about worrying about papers. Do your due diligence with whatever breed/breeder you select.

Best of luck!
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Wiliam C , Oct 5 9:11 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Breed ideas please!

BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 24, '13 8:50am PST 
Hmmm ... looking over that list again:

* "good with kids"
* "good with other dogs"
* "not a big shedder"
* "not a big drooler"
* "medium to large size
* "playful without being overwhelming"
* "trainable but not too smart"
* "not excessively active"
* "enough energy to play with a 6 yr old boy"


Sounds exactly like every
Spinone I've ever met!?!
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Keyser Soze's Hammer of Thor, Jun 24 12:37 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Breed ideas please!

BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 17, '13 12:51pm PST 
Two words come to mind:

Spinone
&
Italiano.


blue dog
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» There has since been 30 posts. Last posting by Keyser Soze's Hammer of Thor, Jun 24 12:37 pm

Choosing the Right Dog > Most "bomb-proof" breeds?
BRT

Please, be nice - ... or else!
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 24, '13 12:03pm PST 
Tuck:
I would agree, in principle, with what you're saying. But the principle would conflict with the reality ...

Yes, "breeding, socialization, owner, environment and training" are, collectively, of paramount importance. And, I suspect there are people who could raise and train a well-chosen puppy of almost any breed to be a "bomb-proof" dog; but anyone who even thinks to ask of this as a breed characteristic is, most likely, not capable of doing so - this, especially when asking about the "most" bomb-proof" breeds.

For the average dog owner, regardless of how the term "bomb-proof" is defined, choice of breed cannot be ignored ...

One can easily teach (for example) a Golden Retriever to be somewhat protective; but if one wanted a serious protection dog, a Golden is simply a poor choice with which to start.

Conversely, one can easily teach (for example) a Black Russian Terrier to retrieve; but, again, if the desired end result is a gr8 retriever, the initial choice of a BRT would have been ill-advised.

In fact, I have/had both of the aforementioned breeds, and both were/are (IMO) "bombproof" dogs. However, I could NEVER completely quell the retrieving instinct in our Golden. Nor could I EVER teach our BRT to NOT protect. These were/are genetically hard-wired instincts. And of these particular two breeds, it's obvious which would, most likely, be considered "bombproof" - and this, regardless of the fact that the Retriever, statistically, is far more likely to bite.

One of the wonderful things about purebred puppies is that, within the parameters of the genetics and one's ability to raise and train said breed, one basically knows the looks, size and temperament of the future adult dog. And so, although the term "bombproof" is certainly open to interpretation, it would be unwise to ignore choice of breed to that end (IMO).

Having said all that (it's again my opinion only), most breeders are mediocre, at best, and most dogs are poorly bred. With that in mind, I would absolutely agree, Tuck, that choice of breeder is more important than choice of breed.

blue dog
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» There has since been 16 posts. Last posting by Jackson Tan, Feb 25 3:50 am

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