Postings by Iris vom Zauberberg

GO!

(Page 1 of 54: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  [Last 10 entry]  

Service & Therapy Dogs > Harley
Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 2, '13 3:42pm PST 
Our thoughts are with you.
[notify]
» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Flicka ~ CGC, Oct 29 5:20 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > New here- introduction!
Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 22, '13 8:16am PST 
Welcome!
[notify]
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Lucy Ribeiro, Sep 27 10:01 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Teaching a non-SD dog a task..help please.

Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 21, '13 7:07am PST 
I want to stress that I am not a trainer, but this is how I would break down the task if I were going to train it to my dog.

This process will take commitment, and will require some assistance from your friend's mother for the second part. This process assumes that the mother is able to stand comfortably and will do so when asked.

--------------------------------
First, train the dog to bark on cue.

To do this, I would capture the behavior with a marker and treat. (I use a clicker as the marker, or the word "yes!") Whichever you choose, be consistent. This might take a while, depending on how barky the dog is. As soon as the dog understands that barking gets it a treat, attach a command word to the bark, and only reward when the bark is requested.

Make this solid before proceeding to part two, phasing out the treats and moving to praise as the reward.

Second, train the dog to bark when the mother stands.

Ask the mother to stand. After she is standing, give the bark command. Reward. From this point onward, the dog is commanded to bark ONLY when the mother stands.

Repeat this for as many minutes as possible up to 5 minutes. Try to do this three times a day, but I understand that you have to be realistic. Do this for a week or so.

Next time you train, do the stand --> command --> bark exercise a few times. Then have the mother stand and wait a few seconds to give the bark command. See if the dog offers the bark without the command.

If it does offer the bark without the command, Jackpot! Shower the dog with treats and praise. Have the mother stand again and wait a few seconds to give the command. If the dog barks, jackpot again. If not, give the command, reward and go back to the stand/bark command exercise for a few more iterations.

From this point on, mark and reward barking when the mother stands. When this is solid, begin to phase out the treats by skipping a reward, then skipping two, etc. Make it gradual so that the dog is not frustrated.

If it does not bark without the command, give the command, reward and continue with the stand --> command--> bark exercises a few more iterations.

Every so often, wait a few seconds after the mother stands to give the command to bark. Eventually, the dog should offer the bark without the command and you can jackpot and build on this.

------------------------------------
This is how I would go about teaching this task. If others have suggestions, I hope they will post them, because I am always ready to learn more about training.
[notify]
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Nov 1 10:04 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Teaching a non-SD dog a task..help please.

Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 20, '13 7:26am PST 
Would your friend consider it adequate to have the dog bark when her mother got up?

If so, I would be happy to write up the way I would train this task. I would post it now, but I'm not well today.
[notify]
» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Nov 1 10:04 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > It finally happened.

Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 18, '13 2:56pm PST 
I think it's important not to expect handlers to put the wants of the public before his or her own health and the protection of the training of the dog.

I use as much grace as I can muster, depending on how much energy I have and how ill I am that day. I genuinely try to leave a positive impression of SD handlers. But I don't think I should be expected to put public desires ahead of my health or ahead of the need to protect my dog's training.
[notify]
» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Diesel, Oct 20 7:40 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Are your dogs allowed to be dogs?
Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 18, '13 10:01am PST 
I get that question often regarding my service dog, whether she ever gets to be off-duty and just be a dog (yes!). I've never been asked that by a rescue agency when looking for a pet dog.
[notify]
» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Dr. Watson, Aug 22 9:59 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > It finally happened.

Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 16, '13 2:16pm PST 
Yoshi, for some handlers, having their SDs touched is like being touched themselves. It's an invasion.

In a perfect world, an insistent child would get the education she obviously needed and the handler would be able to protect her dog and herself without resorting to raising her voice and blocking her dog.
[notify]
» There has since been 16 posts. Last posting by Diesel, Oct 20 7:40 pm


Behavior & Training > Frustrated...Dog barking & growling at EVERYTHING outside the home

Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 16, '13 1:58pm PST 
Is he like this on walks, too?

Perhaps try introducing the stimulus gradually, by opening one window a tiny bit. Then, when he's used to what he can hear through the small opening (i.e., is not barking), open it a bit more, etc. Then add another window, small opening, etc.
[notify]
» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Aug 22 8:42 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > It finally happened.

Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 16, '13 7:27am PST 
I'm so sorry that you had this experience. How are you feeling now?

I've had children run up and hug Iris when my back was turned before I could stop them. It is unsettling to have my dog mauled and my space invaded. My response usually is to try to educate the children and their parents if they are available, after disengaging them from my SD, of course.

From the sound of it, this option was not available to you. You had all you could do just to protect your dog and your space.

My worst incident was also in WalMart. It was during Iris's public access training. I was with a group of SD handlers browsing in an aisle and a little girl of about three or four years old ran up, slapped Iris on the rear and ran away. This really demonstrated to me why service dogs have to be so steady in public. The most unexpected things WILL happen.

Iris just looked at the child running away, and then looked at me. I was too stunned to chase the child down to find the parent. Next time, I would, though.
[notify]
» There has since been 22 posts. Last posting by Diesel, Oct 20 7:40 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Washing Chaplin out -- feeling pretty low
Iris vom- Zauberberg

Service Werewolf
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 14, '13 9:56am PST 
I'm so very sorry. This is a terribly difficult decision to make.

(((hug)))
[notify]
» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Mattie, Aug 15 4:17 pm

(Page 1 of 54: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  [Last 10 entry]  

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the rapid nature of forum postings, it's quite possible our calculation of the number of ensuing forum posts may be off by one or two or more at any given moment.