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Catahoula Leopard Dog > Introduction of Cat to Catahoula



Member Since
01/30/2013
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 30, '13 5:12pm PST 
Posted this elsewhere on this site but here it is again. I would ask a vet and a behaviorist, but here is some advice...

We have a catahoula with possibly some cur, and she and the feral kitten that came to live with us for about 9 months were best friends! They played and cuddled a lot, and the catahoula was appropriately gentle, although the kitten was a mischeivious kitten and liked to roughouse with her too. This catahoula spent 10 days on a cross country car ride, mostly in my arms, when she was a puppy. Even though she has a big prey drive, she is also very af afectionate, eager to please, and obedient, which I think is partly who she is but was also nurtured by "attachment theory" bonding and being cuddled all the time (mostly because of the 10 day car drive) when she was a puppy. In the car she learned to be in small spaces and do what she was told, and at gas stations on walks, but then we also stopped at farms where she got full play time free ranging...It was a great balance. Anyway, I think maybe if the dog learns to enjoy cuddling and bonding with people and then with animals or both together as well as playing hard, it will help a lot. his is just an idea. The catahoula does not like strange dogs--she barks and acts aggressive, but never actually fights with them. But at home with the other animals,she while the cat was here, she was a perfect lady with a small italian greyhound, a vizsla around her size, and with the kitten. She was raised with the italian greyhoud, though, so maybeshe is acclimated to that size. She is mostly the "alpha" but never has to enforce it and yields in many situations. She does kill squirrels...and recently killed a racoon! I do think it is based on the individual dog, of course. She is a very mellow catahoula...She is up when she is up, with lots of energy and athleticism, but otherwise she is totally relaxing and calm. The viszla did attack the greyhound three times, so I have to keep them separate Anyway, who knows if the bonding/cuddling thing is what really did it, but it can't hurt. Many emphasize getting out the energy, which is important, but I think it is not just getting out the energy, but nurturing the nurturing side of the dog. If she is always hunting and playing with a ball or something else, she might want to do that all the time, I would guess. So I think they both need outlets for energy and also to have the gentle bonding side with the small animals and with people modeled and taught and nurtured. Just an idea...No scientific evidence here!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Jan 30 5:12 pm

Catahoula Leopard Dog > Help: Six Month old female with serious prey drive


Member Since
01/30/2013
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 30, '13 5:07pm PST 
The point is, it is not just getting out the energy, but nurturing the nurturing side of the dog. If she is always hunting and playing with a ball or something else, she might want to do that all the time, I would guess. So I think they both need outlets for energy and also to have the gentle bonding side with the small animals and with people modeled and taught and nurtured. Just an idea...No scientific evidence here!
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Feb 1 10:15 am


Catahoula Leopard Dog > Help: Six Month old female with serious prey drive



Member Since
01/30/2013
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 30, '13 5:04pm PST 
We have a catahoula with possibly some cur, and she and the feral kitten that came to live with us for about 9 months were best friends! They played and cuddled a lot, and the catahoula was appropriately gentle, although the kitten was a mischeivious kitten and liked to roughouse with her too. This catahoula spent 10 days on a cross country car ride, mostly in my arms, when she was a puppy. Even though she has a big prey drive, she is also very af afectionate, eager to please, and obedient, which I think is partly who she is but was also nurtured by "attachment theory" bonding when she was a puppy. I think maybe if the dog learns to enjoy cuddling and bonding with people and then with animals or both together as well as playing hard, it will help a lot. his is just an idea. Bebe does not like strange dogs--she barks and acts aggressive, but never actually fights with them. But at home with the other animals,she while the cat was here, she was a perfect lady with a small italian greyhound, a vizsla around her size, and with the kitten. She was raised with the italian greyhoud, though, so maybeshe is acclimated to that size. She is mostly the "alpha" but never has to enforce it and yields in many situations. She does kill squirrels...and recently killed a racoon! I do think it is based on the individual dog, of course. She is a very mellow catahoula...She is up when she is up, with lots of energy and athleticism, but otherwise she is totally relaxing and calm. The viszla did attack the greyhound three times, so I have to keep them separate frown Anyway, who knows if the bonding/cuddling thing is what really did it, but it can't hurt.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Feb 1 10:15 am

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