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Food & Nutrition > A food question or maybe two



Member Since
10/29/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 11:30am PST 
20 lbs is definitely a small breed. I would choose a puppy food for small breeds, or a regular puppy food. You wouldn't need to feed the puppy/junior foods since those are generally meant for large/giant breeds that have a very long growth phase.

It sounds like you've chosen Acana, but if you're looking for other thoughts, I really like Royal Canin, I know so many dogs that live long healthy lives on it with very few health problems. They have a diet called Mini Puppy for small breeds.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Feb 18 6:55 am

Food & Nutrition > Tomato Pomace and Food Allergies?


Member Since
10/29/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 11:21am PST 
It's possible your dog is allergic to tomato pomace, but it's possible she has a sensitivity/intolerance to something else in the food as well. It could even be the lamb. It might not even be an allergy or sensitivity to an ingredient at all. Perhaps she isn't easily able to handle the food due to poor digestibility of the ingredients. Or maybe it's not the food at all, and she has an underlying health condition that affects her digestive tract. I would get your vet to help you rule things out, and if it does turn out to be allergies, do allergy testing and/or an elimination trial to figure out what she's allergic to.

Dogs, like people, don't grow out of allergies, they can only develop them after they've been exposed to the ingredient. The reaction could become less severe if you move from food that has a poor quality source for an ingredient to a food that has a high quality source of the same ingredient (some poor quality proteins are high in histamine which make the immune response to them more severe). But if your dog is no longer reacting to any foods that contain wheat and barley, it was probably something besides the wheat and barley that your dog was allergic/sensitive to (or it was another issue altogether). The truth is, food allergies in general are rare in dogs, and wheat is not that high on the list of common food allergens.

Again, I think the best thing you can do for your dog is to check it out with your vet to find some definite answers that could help your dog's stomach aches as fast as possible. Playing around with different foods will probably just leave you more confused and could leave your dog in pain for longer.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Feb 16 1:37 pm


Food & Nutrition > wolves dogs genetics and starch



Member Since
10/29/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 10:56am PST 
It may be true that dogs don't need starch to survive. Protein and fat alone can provide them with energy and maintain proper cell and body functions. But dogs can actually benefit from some starch in their diet, provided it is in the right amount and is in a highly digestible form.

Dogs derive about the same amount of energy from starch as they do from protein, and obviously (as we can see from the articles) they can metabolize it very well, especially if the starch has been cooked and ground, which greatly improves digestibility. The benefit of supplying some of the dog's energy through starch (rather than protein and fat alone) is that it frees up the protein to perform other important functions in the body, like building muscle tissue, helping with immune function, and transporting other nutrients to cells throughout the body (among many other important things).

Since it has been shown that too much protein and fat can lead to and intensify some health issues in dogs, providing energy solely through protein and fat can be problematic. If some of the energy the dog needs can be provided through starch rather than protein, it is a good way to both help regulate the protein level, and to free up most of the available protein to help with all the other functions it needs to perform in the body.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Feb 20 4:02 pm


Food & Nutrition > What kind of food and how much for a 6.5 lb puppy?



Member Since
10/29/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 10:32am PST 
I personally like Royal Canin and think it's one of the highest quality brands out there (I know many people on here strongly disagree). But there are other good brands out there, but I would only trust the ones that do research and trials on their foods, and that have extremely good quality and safety protocols.

Here's a link to a list of questions that are good to ask pet food companies to see if they are a company you can trust, along with a number of company's answers: http://www.dogforum.com/dog-food/pet-food-company-survey-20141/. It's pretty interesting to read. You can judge for yourself which one you think is best.

As for feeding amounts, most feeding guides base this on the puppy's target weight as an adult. You said your puppy is 6.5lbs, but how big will she be full-grown? Also, each food is different, so a "general" feeding guide could be very wrong depending on the food you're feeding. I definitely suggest going by the bag's feeding guide since it's meant specifically for that food. But remember that it's still only a suggested amount on the bag - depending on your dog (because every dog is different), you may need to adjust a bit. It's a good idea to get you puppy checked out by the vet a few times as she's growing to make sure she's on track with her weight.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Feb 16 10:32 am


Food & Nutrition > How long to feed Great Dane Puppy Puppy food



Member Since
10/29/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 10:02am PST 
If you're feeding a giant breed dog a puppy food meant for small or medium breeds, then that might be a problem, since small dogs grow quickly and have a short growth span (like 8-12 months as opposed to almost 2 years). But if the food is specifically meant for large breeds, then the calcium, phosphorus and energy levels have been considered in formulation. These foods can also include glucosamine and chondroitin to help support joints. That is exactly why an adult food shouldn't be fed until the dog is an adult, because an adult food was not made for the needs of a growing large breed puppy, and the nutrient and energy levels are meant for an adult dog. It has been proven that puppies need different nutrition than adult dogs, and especially large and giant breeds - so what is the benefit of feeding an adult food? Puppy foods for large breed dogs are not just out there for marketing, there is research and science behind their formulations (if they are actually good companies that do the research and trials).
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Jul 17 1:51 am

Dog Health > Dog drinks a lot of water, loss of bladder control and drink own urine


Member Since
10/29/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 9:48am PST 
After reading your post, my first thought was, it probably doesn't help that your dog has chonic UTIs. Did you talk to your vet about doing anything to help manage this? I also did some research into Addison's in dogs, and found that dogs being treated for Addison's disease with glucocorticoid can sometimes have excessive drinking (polydipisia or pd) and urination (polyuria or pu) as a side-effect. If your dog is on that, I would suggest you ask your vet about using less medication, or using a different medication to manage the Addison's disease. Here is a quote from one article where I found this information:

"The most common adverse effect of therapy is PU/PD which is usually due to excessive glucocorticoid supplementation or the intrinsic glucocorticoid activity of fludrocortisone. In dogs with PU/PD the glucocorticoid dose should first be tapered or discontinued. If the problem persists, consideration should be given to switching to an alternative mineralocorticoid treatment (20)."
http://www.vetgrad.com/show10MinuteTopUp.php?type=&Entity=10 MinuteTopUps&ID=52
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Lucky, Mar 2 3:59 am


Food & Nutrition > wolves dogs genetics and starch



Member Since
10/29/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 8:21am PST 
Interesting article, thanks for sharing!! It's funny to think that so many people believe that domestic dogs should be fed exactly like wolves, when the truth is, they are not at all the same! Even domestic dogs are VERY different from each other - a Shih Tzu should not be fed like a St Bernard! And neither should be fed like a wolf!!! smile
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by , Feb 20 4:02 pm


Food & Nutrition > How long to feed Great Dane Puppy Puppy food



Member Since
10/29/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 8:15am PST 
Definitely feed a puppy food to a Great Dane until 18-20 months. Great Danes have a VERY long growth phase and switching to an adult food too early could really cause severe joint problems. Until about 12-14 months, the amount of puppy food you feed should gradually increase, since they are growing most rapidly up until that time and need the most energy. But after the growth rate levels out a bit at about a year, the energy requirements are a bit less again, so the amount of food should decrease slightly again until they are full-grown adults.

I'm not familiar with the Eagle Pack brand, but when I looked up the food and their feeding guide it made me skeptical about using it for a giant breed. The chart doesn't go over 100lbs, which is where the giant breed weight generally starts. The amount they suggest is also very general and does not change much over the growth span... not very helpful.

I personally like the Royal Canin brand for giant dogs because it is really meant JUST for giant dogs, and their needs during growth are different than even a large breed's. They have a longer growth phase and different energy needs, plus the stress on their joints is even greater. The Royal Canin giant food actually splits up the giant puppy food into two phases (puppy and "junior") since it's been shown that giant dogs have two distinct growth phases (as I mentioned earlier).

I would start by going to your vet to make sure your dog's weight is on track, then making adjustments to the food if needed.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Jul 17 1:51 am


German Shepherd > Food problems



Member Since
10/29/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 7:45am PST 
GSDs are very well-known for their digestive problems. I know a few ppl who have GSDs or GS mixes with the same issues of diarrhea that your dog has. I feel for you and for him!

Many, many people will tell you that the Royal Canin GS food changed their dog's life. I do know that Royal Canin has done a ton of research specifically on GSDs and the food they made just for them is a real answer to their problems. I found a video (kinda poor quality, sorry) that explains the research behind the food and why it works... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rR5775wtjtg.

I wouldn't put so much weight on an ingredient list as most people do to tell you if a food is good or bad. Just looking at ingredients doesn't tell you much at all about the quality or digestibility of the food, and it definitely doesn't tell you if the food actually works. Royal Canin has done more research and trials with their food than any other pet food company out there. There's a reason why dogs do so well on their food.

I wouldn't knock it until you try it. It would likely mean the end of your dog's diarrhea problems.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Sparty, Apr 19 3:03 pm

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