Postings by Mulder's Family

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Food & Nutrition > Puppy food for Giant breed's
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 16, '14 6:39am PST 
Before doing anything, talk to your breeder about what they are feeding and if there are any guidelines they recommend you follow. If they are a reputable breeder with any knowledge at all, they should be able to explain all of this too you.

As a general rule, large/giant breed puppies need lower levels of calcium and phosphorous than your typical sized puppy or adult dog. A good rule of thumb is 1.5% cal/1% phos or LOWER is ideal. Too much cal/phos can lead to later bone and joint issues in giant breeds.

Most foods labeled specifically for "Large or Giant Breed Puppies" have good levels of cal/phos and are fine to feed up to 18 months. SOME other puppy foods and adult formulas have appropriate levels, but you NEED to read labels carefully and go by the MAXIMUM levels in the food, not the minimums which are usually what's printed on the bag.

As always, avoid foods full of synthetic dyes/vitamins/preservatives, and picks foods with good quality meat protein sources as the bulk of the diet.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Tyler , Today 8:15 am

Behavior & Training > Red Heeler aggressive towards SO while I'm home.
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 7, '14 7:04pm PST 
Where I would go from here, is give SO all control of the resources for now. Implement NILF, or "nothing in life is free".

SO is the one who handles all or the majority of the walking, training, feeding, ect. Everything Scoot needs or wants, he has to go through your SO to get it. Not only that, but he actually has to DO things for SO in order to get those things. For the daily meals, make him sit or perform some other behavior. Before walks, make him sit at the door for a few moments before he's allowed to walk out with your SO. Amp up on the casual training, spend a bit more time each night working on some basic commands like "stay", "come", "leave it", etc.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Apr 8 5:11 pm


Behavior & Training > My "poor" dogs...lol.

Ridley

Cry cry cry!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 7, '14 6:48pm PST 
The only one who can determine what "being a dog" is really all about, is the dog himself shh

My dogs are never unhappy on a structured walk. But I can't say they would PREFER to be on one, versus one where they can explore and have a bit more freedom.

Part of being a responsible dog owner, is understand your's and your dog's limits. If you have a reactive dog, obviously don't put him in situations where he is likely to encounter something that will trigger his reactivity. That doesn't mean he should never be allowed to, as they say, stop and stiff the roses wink

Ridley was very reactive for a long period. Part of his cure was structure... and then part was freedom. I never STOPPED letting him do the things he enjoyed doing. I just knew when it was time to cinch up and keep control, and when it was ok to loosen up a little.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Risa W-FDM/MF RE RL1 CA CGC, Apr 8 6:22 am


Behavior & Training > Red Heeler aggressive towards SO while I'm home.

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 31, '14 2:45pm PST 
What sort of relationship does your SO have with your dog? Does she have any responsibilities for the dog, IE walking/feeding/training?

If not, now's a good time to start. Let SO take over some of the daily dog routines, so the dog can start to build more of a bond with her. Also set aside time for your SO to work with Scoot on her own, and in your presence. Have her practice simple routines like sit, down, stay, and come in and out of your presence.

Most likely this is a form of resource guarding. Scoot sees you as a valuable resource- hence why he will react this way only when you are around, and not when they are alone together (no resource to guard, no need to react). If your SO has a stronger relationship with Scoot, it will make further training, and a resolution to this problem, much easier to accomplish. She needs to establish herself as a person of value as well, and not just a potential threat to a necessary resource.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Apr 8 5:11 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > GSD Breeder

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 25, '14 5:44pm PST 
Whaaaaat.

Sabi, mind PMing me some of those names? I'm dead curious.

I still feel like there are breeders out there for you. Getting discouraged and giving up the search only serves them... you gotta serve yourself, and find that perfect pup.
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» There has since been 30 posts. Last posting by Sabi, Mar 31 11:42 pm

Behavior & Training > older Bernese attacking puppy
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 18, '14 5:24pm PST 
I don't know, this sounds a little more serious than just two dogs working it out... OP said the older dog has already physically injured the puppy, we don't know if he'll escalate or not.

This one most likely is one that needs to be seen by a behaviorist before anything else is done. I, personally, wouldn't feel comfortable putting a young puppy with an older dog who has already done serious physical harm to it.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Kali, Mar 19 4:11 pm


Behavior & Training > New Puppy... Help?

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 10, '14 9:35am PST 
What rewards you use need to be tailored to the dog, not strictly our own personal ideals of what "should" or "should not" be rewarding to a dog.

Some dogs work for praise and affection alone, some for toys or play, and some are largely food motivated. What you should be using is what fits best with the dog. If you should find yourself with a dog that is uninterested in praise or toys, you will be doing the dog a great disservice by denying a tool (yes, food can be a tool too) that will aid in the dog's learning.

Remember, dogs are animals, not little human-serving drones who want nothing more from life than to please you. SOME dogs, maybe, but should you be in the majority of dog owners who has a dog who actually wants more than just you alone, again, you will be creating a pretty frustrating learning environment for both you and the dog trying for force your dog to work for something that it doesn't really care about.

You COULD work to building up yourself or a toy as the primary motivator... but good luck doing that without food first wink

Also keep in mind you have a coonhound mix. As a type, hounds are independent, heavily self-motivated dogs... sniffing, baying, yes digging... all very self-rewarding, hound-y things that the dog will likely (at least at first) care more about than you.

So, use whatever works best for the dog to reward and redirect. If digging is a problem, try putting the digging on command. Reinforce the digging first so you can attach a command to it, then attach a "stop" command to the action, so you can then control the behavior.

Or get a sand pit and let the dog work out its natural desire to dig... if the dog finds that motivating, maybe make that a reward even.

Or you could just put rocks in the flowerbed.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Bodhi, Mar 16 7:13 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > New Members and Attack of the Spambots

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 4, '14 7:54am PST 
I can think of a few reasons why someone would need/want to post something quickly without a petpage... namely, someone who doesn't have a dog yet and needs to ask an important question about a breeder/rescue.

Plenty of people have come to these forums without dogs, asking for advise or opinions on specific breeds, breeders, rescues, or shelters. Sometimes that information can be pressing... for example, "spoke to the breeder last night and she wants me to put a deposit down, but something she said makes me worry, is "XXX" something a reputable breeder would do??" or other things along those lines.

Or just people wanting info on breeds... who's going to wait around here for 2 weeks when they could easily pop over to almost any other forum on the internet and wait 30 seconds for information that may or may not be as valuable as the wealth dogster and its community has to offer.

I vote captcha. Something simple that will weed out the majority of bots.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Ember FDX, Mar 5 6:49 am


Choosing the Right Dog > New Members and Attack of the Spambots

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 3, '14 5:39am PST 
Or implement a CAPTCHA system, so new people who might have a question they need to post ASAP can do so.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Ember FDX, Mar 5 6:49 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Which working dog.
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 27, '14 6:41pm PST 
"East German" is just the colloquial for those pedigrees that rooted from Germany during Soviet control in the country. "DDR" is another name for them. The dogs that were bred there are different than what exists as the "modern" working bloodline in German today (though few actually work exclusively with those pedigrees, as there are few).

Don't get hung up on the thought of importing. ANY line can be acquired here in the states, with dogs being just as good as any across the pond (depending on the breeder, of course). Importing without very good connections is a crapshoot anyway, look stateside for what you want, SOMEONE is breeding it. The link I posted, Chris uses a blend of West/East German and Czech lines, very nice dogs in their own right. Both of mine are from either East German, or East/Czech lines, importing never even crossed my mind.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Mar 3 10:41 am

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