Postings by Peach's Family

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Other Barks & Woofs > Don't know where to put this! Brass, or nickel?
Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 9, '12 3:34pm PST 
I figured Dogster is a good place to conduct market research ;D

When purchasing a dog collar or leash, if given the option, would you prefer a brass (Gold colour) or nickel (Silver colour) d-ring or snap hook?

I'm thinking of making the switch due to brass' "flashier" look, but I know it can tarnish more, and I wondered if it even made a big difference. So! Buying an adorable "designer" collar for your pooch; flashy brass or natural nickel?
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Peach, Nov 9 3:34 pm

Behavior & Training > Dangerous and capable. Severe aggression help.
Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 9, '12 3:28pm PST 
I didn't see it mentioned at all by any other members, but Atlas may have a mental problem.

You say he's lovey "normally". He was socialised, and trained. Maybe you used some methods not everyone agrees with, but they certainly don't seem bad enough to elicit the response he's displaying. He seemingly escalated overnight from a docile dog to a vicious attack hound. Maybe he had some bad behaviours- guarding, reactivity, mouthiness- but they don't add up to sudden violent displays. Resource guarders don't attack the farthest thing from them, unless it seems the most threatening. Is your little brother threatening? I had a neurotic guarding dog in the past, the kind you couldn't walk past when she had food, and the key thing about the guarding is that SHE WANTS IT. She's not going to run away from it to chase even the biggest threat, because she's abandoning the thing she wants.

It honestly sounds to me that there is some kind of switch in Atlas' head that is going off, and he's losing it. Coupled with poor pre-existing behaviours and his knowledge of what he is NORMALLY allowed to get away with, something is breaking and he's just exploding on you. I cannot imagine being attacked not once, but multiple times by any dog- let alone a large, powerful breed!- and being able to function normally with him. You are an extremely strong person and a very tough family. If you think you can do it, I would consider bringing Atlas to a vet to run tests. Make sure his thyroid is in order. Test for epilepsy (This could actually be the issue, epileptic seizures can cause extremely aggressive behaviour in dogs who just "clock out" while having or coming back from one) Contact a behaviourist and find out what else you might have to look for.

Muzzle him. It might seem cruel, but it's best. You're protecting yourselves, and Atlas. He won't have a chance to bite an outsider, or continue to escalate the behaviour. Management may end up being your only option if he's just an angry dog.

And finally, if it comes down to it and you don't think you can do this for another 10-15 years, and feel it's too dangerous to give him to someone else, you can euthanise him. We take in animals to give them the best lives possible. Sometimes, that means saying good-bye. We have unfortunately irreparably damaged many breeds of animal with our need to create the perfect specimen, and sometimes, that means a dog is a terrible temperament, but hasn't got the social mores that humans have that keep him in check. Or maybe he has a chemical imbalance, but has no way to express that to you.

I hope you can help him. I really do.
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» There has since been 211 posts. Last posting by Dogster HQ, Nov 26 11:18 am


Puppy Place > Spaying and the cost rant!!

Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 3, '12 6:01am PST 
Wow. I'm not terribly surprised at the American ethnocentrism I'm seeing; it's pretty common.

NOT EVERYONE LIVES IN THE UNITED STATES.

With as many people as you guys have, there are more options. More supply = less cost to attract clients. There are also MANY more spay/neuter options in the United States. I had a friend who was totally shocked I had to pay almost 100$ to neuter my tomcat, and over 100$ to spay my queen. The closest spay/neuter operation for a cat was in Ottawa, they got back to me SIX MONTHS after I had him done in Quebec (Cheapest rate I could find, even factoring in the cost of gas) which was over A YEAR after I had called them. They are booked SOLID at these low-cost places. And the low-cost? Was still 70-90$. I was living in poverty, on social assistance. Thank god I'm not anymore.

Canada does not operate the same way as the States. It is extremely hard to find a low-cost option. It's hard to find a reasonable cost option. And not everyone can save. Either people weren't aware that it would cost so damn much to alter their dog, rates have increased, or they've moved and didn't know there was such a difference from place to place. It would be 145$ to spay Peach in Quebec; 450$ to spay her here in Ontario. There is less than a 2 hour drive between the two places. What's funny is the 145$ clinic is in a place where people have a high standard of living; the town I live in is a town immersed in poverty.

I totally get where you're coming from, Emma-Jean. It's ridiculous what vets think they can charge. I simply cannot believe that the surgery I'm receiving from a cheap vet is any different than the surgery from the expensive vet. Especially since I've seen the outcomes. The expensive vet released the dog two hours after surgery, and she was still wobbly. Pain meds and a cone would have cost extra. The cheap vet (At least in the case of my queen) refused to release her until she was 100% awake, just in case of complications (She is only a 4 pound adult animal!) They fed her, offered me a cone, and gave me an extra dose of pain medication for her, in case she needed it. This is not a case of higher quality = higher charge, it's a case of higher greed = higher charge.

Good luck finding your pupkin a place to be spayed. If you at all have the option, check out the Taschereau clinic in Greenfield Park, Montreal, Quebec. Even if it's hard to get there, it will be worth it! Dr Alan and his team are great people. And remember, there's recent research suggesting that spay/neuter may not be necessary until middle-life, maybe not at all. If you can keep an eye on your girl and diaper her for hygiene issues, you may be fine.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by MIKA&KAI, Nov 6 7:20 am


Behavior & Training > Small dog guarding from just one cat.

Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 20, '12 5:45am PST 
I have two cats. I also have Peach.

Since we moved (A little bit before that, but not much. Mostly extremely tasty treats) Peach has taken to guarding everything from Astrid. Right now it's just the hairy eyeball and some growling, but I don't want it to escalate. It has already spread from tasty treats to the food bowl, toys, the bed, and existing in the same space as Peach when she deigns necessary.

But just the one cat.

I don't know why. Both cats are affectionate and curious, so they both "bother her". But where she'll growl if Astrid gets too close on the bed, she cuddles with Egon. If Astrid comes to drink from her water (It's better, obviously) while she eats, she growls. If Egon does it, she's fine.

She doesn't guard from people at all. And, occasionally, she'll be fine with Astrid. Astrid will be laying on the bed and Peach will cuddle with her and they'll lick each other. Peach will be chasing a bug and Astrid will come to help and they'll kill it together. Peach will be in her crate and Astrid will walk in and lay there, and nothing. I don't get it.

The differences between Egon and Astrid are: M/F, orange/calico, 13lb/7lb. Egon rarely purrs, Astrid never stops. I was thinking maybe she felt the purring was a threatening growl, but she's been perfectly fine cuddling with Astrid while she purred since I theorised that.

What do?!

And please, nobody suggest separating my animals all the damn time. That is not a solution, nor is it practical or fair. I want a training regime to get Peach to understand that the cat is ALWAYS a good thing. How can I positively reinforce cat=good without accidentally reinforcing hairy eyeball/growling at cat=good?
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Peach, Sep 20 5:45 am


Small Dogs > *head desk*... No, she is *not* a mini Chihuahua!

Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 22, '12 4:44pm PST 
Omg, Daisy's person, I was looking at the little version of her pic, trying to figure out what she was, thinking for sure she was wearing some sort of little Victorian poofy-collared costume get-up. How CUTE is her little curly beard?!

I'm done =3
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Tyrion, Oct 4 11:22 pm

Small Dogs > *head desk*... No, she is *not* a mini Chihuahua!
Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 21, '12 6:29pm PST 
Peach's parents were 8 (sire) and 9 (dam) pounds, respectively. Her grandparents were 5 and 6 (Grandsire and granddam on sire's side) and 6 and 9 (Granddam and grandsire on dam's side)

Peach is a whopping 12 pounds. She is not overweight. She is "robust", very athletic, and extremely hairy. She's actually not much bigger than her mother in appearance.

I love it when people tell me they had/have a "mini", "toy", or "teacup" Pomeranian, and it was so-and-so size, usually under 5 pounds. May I point to the AKC standard, which states: 3-7 pounds, show specimens suggested to be 4-6 pounds, with an addendum that "Any dog over or under the limits is objectionable; however, overall quality should be favored over size."

Basically, they had beautiful AKC standard animals and hadn't the faintest clue. Somehow, Peach picked up large genes from who-knows-how-far back. She WAS the largest bitch of her litter, of course.

I also get a lot of people who think she is a long-haired Chihuahua or Sheltie or American Eskimo dog. Most people have no idea what breed of animal stands before them.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Tyrion, Oct 4 11:22 pm


Behavior & Training > How can I be a pack leader after an attack

Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 21, '12 6:22pm PST 
I know you're trying to help your dog, but you're going about this all wrong.

Think of it this way: if you were out walking with your friends and a stranger approached you, attacked you, killed your best friend, and escaped, you would be terrified. Even if you found new friends, if someone forced you to go out in public surrounded by strangers, you would freak out too. Imagine being grabbed or approached by someone who reminded you of your attacker.

Every time you bring Lily to the dog park, you're forcing her to relive her attack. She was attacked, she may have been hurt, a friend/family member died, and now she isn't sure if it will happen again. Will this dog bite me? Will this dog kill the new puppy? Is this one just sniffing me, or is he mean? It's an awful lot of stress for a naturally high-strung breed to feel!

Start small. Keep bringing your puppies to the park, but start with just bringing Lily to a safe place that is quiet. Maybe some dogs on leashes walk by, or maybe there's a calm dog behind a fence you can pass. Work it up slowly as she relaxes, walking in places where she might see more dogs, or dogs might bark at her. End by bringing her to the dog park and keeping her nearby and safe, until she is one day able to go out and play again. She may never be "normal" again, she's undergone a traumatic experience, but she may get back to the point of being able to go to the park and play with her family members.

Be a good pack leader by supporting your dog and listening to what she is saying. It's just too much for her, she needs less.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Lily, Aug 22 7:37 pm


Behavior & Training > Am I just really dumb?

Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 29, '12 2:25pm PST 
I'm not sure how Shadow acts regularly, but she sounds very anxious. Does she ever relax enough to run around the yard joyfully, bounding and happy? If she does, that's your best time to recall train her. While her tongue is blowing in the wind, kneel down, throw your arms open (Unless that triggers her) and happily call to her. I guarantee you she will bound to you happily. Gently grab her collar or touch her, pet her, thank her, and then immediately release her back to her play.

You're letting her know that you want to be part of her happiness when you call her, and that you will let her get right back to it as soon as you can. In the future you can hold her longer, ask at different times for her recall, or otherwise change criteria. For right now, just let her know it's okay to come back to you.

=) That's how I got three little dogs to enjoy coming back to me. It's the greatest feeling in the world to have a dog who is so happy they'll run at you, jump into your arms, and then run off again to play more.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Yoshi, Jul 30 2:27 pm


Small Dogs > Collars & Leashes! What do you use?

Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 29, '12 2:20pm PST 
-Shameless Plug- My own! I make and sell dog and cat collars and leashes and will be adding vest harnesses for both species soon, extra-small and large dog collars, too!

;D

Peach has my design of a flat no-pressure collar on at all times for her ID. We use a 4 foot flat leash with a lobster clasp and a fabric vest harness for walks. When we go somewhere to play, we break out the 20 foot pink long line, and she gets to swim or chase balls to her heart's content while remaining safe =D
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» There has since been 20 posts. Last posting by Misha, Feb 25 6:20 am

Dog Health > I can't believe how many fat dogs there are...
Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 8, '12 3:46pm PST 
I get the opposite often from the owners of small, short-coated dogs. The father-in-law is bad for it. He has a small Pom with a short teddy coat, and for a period of time she was about 4 pounds overweight. Her cheeks had rolls, and when she sat, you couldn't see her feet around her girth. But he says Peach (Who has appropriate, if flat, coat) is overweight. Peach is 9 pounds, 13" at the shoulder, 13" long, with a 13" girth and a waist that is at least 5" smaller, though I haven't measured it. She's athletic, and furry.

And people think she's fat.

Most people have a very disfigured sense of weight, space, and size.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Risa W-FDM/MF RE RL1 CA CGC, Jul 11 5:12 pm

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