Postings by Happy's Family

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Service & Therapy Dogs > Vest for medical dog
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 15, '14 7:17pm PST 
Didn't the program that trained your dog give you a vest?
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Apr 15 7:17 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Want service dog and have very limited options/resources, help!
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 11, '14 11:45pm PST 
Guest, having just a short look at the 'program' ( I hesitate to call it that) that you linked I wouldn't advise anyone to get near it with a 50 foot pole. Not only is their site an absolute nightmare of misspelled words, miss mashed sentences and horrible grammar but they have a very poor understanding of dog behavior and training shown by their information.

I hope the dog you have is well trained but I have serious doubts on the abilities of these people to correctly train a dog.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Apr 11 11:45 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Disabled Vet / needs therapy dog

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 11, '14 11:35pm PST 
Bobby and Silas are right, what you are looking for is a service dog, not a Therapy dog.

The difference is that a service dog is individually trained to do work or tasks for a disabled individual. A therapy dog is trained to bring comfort and joy to someone other than their handler. The handler's of service dogs have public access rights while the handler's of therapy dogs do not.

As for programs that will help vets there are a Lot of them out there. If you could give me an idea what part of the country you are in I might could give you better leads but first thing I'd do is check with your doctor to make sure they are in support of you using a service dog since most programs require information from your doctor.

In the mean time you could look here, put in PTSD as the type and your state and you should pull up a number of programs that train dogs for PTSD some local and some national. Feel free to ask questions about any programs you think look promising.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Apr 11 11:35 pm


Behavior & Training > My dog has aggression towards other dogs.?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 23, '14 12:11am PST 
Honestly?

Some dogs are not going to like other dogs. I can't tell if there is something triggering without having seen his former interactions but this isn't very uncommon in dogs that have been taken to dog parks from a young age.

Dog parks are full of rude, badly behaved dogs who don't know proper communication skills. If your dog is one who just isn't crazy about other dogs and never has been (which seems to be the case) then just respect his wishes and don't take him to the dog park. Look into other activities that you can get your dog into that you both will enjoy.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Feb 23 12:11 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Difference between an emotional service dog and a pet?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 7, '14 3:16pm PST 
Bunny, to address your question, a dog being an ESA under the law is only covered if the owner is disabled (or in some cases the elderly) and their treating psychiatrist feels that a pet would be a benefit to their patient. Then they could apply to their landlord for reasonable accommodation, there is really only one reason that a person can be denied reasonable accommodation, and that is if the breed of dog they have/are looking at is denied by the owners insurance policy.

Caledonia, no matter what those groups say a ESA is still not a service animal. A service dog must be specifically task trained as per the ADA in order to be granted public access rights with their handler.

From the newest revision/clarification found Here

"Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA."
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Silas, Feb 8 2:04 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Difference between an emotional service dog and a pet?
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 5, '14 9:35am PST 
The important thing to note is that an ESA is nothing more than a pet who has some rights to be in housing, and under the Air Carrier's Access Act. They have No rights to be in public places with their owner. No rights under the American's with Disabilties act.

They likely aren't well known in Canada because they're honestly just pets. The law has just written in that in some situations some disabled people are able to have pets in situations where normally they wouldn't.

This might help you.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Silas, Feb 8 2:04 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Feeding Service Dogs in the Grocery Store

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 12, '14 8:27pm PST 
It is Never appropriate for a regular customer to ask for ID on a service dog. If you feel like there is a problem you can notify management but it is then up to them to do something about it. The person may well have been faking that the dog was a service dog but that isn't for you to judge. A lot of disabilities are invisible.

Her behavior was inappropriate but that isn't something that general customers should police.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Jan 16 2:27 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Hypotheticaly could a Cane Corso make a good Therapy Dog?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 11, '14 5:32pm PST 
Theoretically you could make the right Cane Corso into a therapy dog.. but the reality is that like many guarding breeds they are not well suited for therapy work. A therapy dog should Love attention, they should thrive on strange people touching them.

While almost all puppies are going to be sweet and like people usually when guarding breeds such as Cane Corso's reach maturity they are going to be more suspicious.

If your passion is Therapy work then find a breed who is going to share that passion with you. If your passion is the breed then find activities that the breed will enjoy doing and be passionate about. I recommend weight pull as a good place to start.

Don't ever go into a relationship seeking to change someone, dog or human included. I have a few friends who have tried Cane Corso's as service dogs and generally it doesn't work out well. They tend to do really well until they hit maturity, at which time their suspicious nature kicks in and they start to be defensive of their handler. This is not a safe thing for dog or handler.
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» There has since been 17 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Mar 23 8:02 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Feeding Service Dogs in the Grocery Store

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 6, '14 6:00pm PST 
I'm actually already working on a book of etiquette, but considering how few days I have that are 'good' days that I can write and research it may take a while.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Jan 16 2:27 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Feeding Service Dogs in the Grocery Store
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 5, '14 10:26am PST 
Often handlers of dogs in training will carry treats with them to reward good behavior. Since a Service dog in training(SDit) is still learning it is important that the handler be able to encourage correct behavior. Even with fully trained service dogs some handlers may carry treats for various reasons. A dog is never completely 'done' they always require maintenance training both to improve the bond and to make sure the dog stays sharp on and off duty.

That said feeding the dog a slice of deli meat is bad etiquette and highly inappropriate. I'll be honest, I've carried 'human' food for my SDit more than once, but never feed a dog something I've just bought. However there isn't really a law against it. So other than being inappropriate there isn't much you could say. shrug

Unfortunately there is no book of etiquette to explain to new handlers, or owner trainers how to handle themselves and their dog appropriately in different situations. It's up to either the program, or in cases of Owner trainers themselves to figure out what is and is not acceptable to do in various situations. I would say use common sense but what I find to be common sense and what other's find to be common sense isn't always the same thing. Either way a handler should strive for their partner to be as invisible as possible while doing their duties.
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Jan 16 2:27 pm

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