Postings by Cohen CD RE ADC SGDC FDCh CGN 's Family

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Behavior & Training > How to Simply Teach Recall?
Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 21, '14 6:05pm PST 
Simply put: be more reinforcing than the environment.

Slightly less simply put: work in small increments. Start in less reinforcing environments and work your way up. Don't call your dog to come unless you're willing to bet $100 that your dog will come. Don't risk your dog possibly blowing you off, especially while in the early stages of training. If you start slow and work your way up, you can condition your dog to find you inherently more reinforcing, which opens up the doors to being more reinforcing than anything else in the world... but it takes a lot of time, consistency and effort. Use play, food, praise and anything that your dog values as rewards for simple behaviours.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Cohen CD RE ADC SGDC FDCh CGN , Mon 6:05 pm

Behavior & Training > Fun Training Games?
Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 17, '14 4:37am PST 
Tricks, surely. Rally exercises are very practical. Agility is also practical and loads of fun.

Any of the top obedience trainers that I know train attitude and engagement first before any exercises. You mention that training obedience is getting boring and repetitive, but it doesn't have to be that way. smile
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Cohen CD RE ADC SGDC FDCh CGN , Apr 17 4:37 am


Australian Shepherd > Prick Ears or Standard Aussie Ears?

Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 16, '14 6:37am PST 
Generally I prefer Aussies with rose ears and Border Collies with pricked. Ear set is pretty far down the list of Important Things To Consider when breeding or picking a puppy. I would be most concerned with temperament, balanced structure, drive and health.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Cohen CD RE ADC SGDC FDCh CGN , Apr 16 6:37 am


Choosing the Right Dog > I Need Pictures!

Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 13, '14 6:26pm PST 
I take loads of shots of my girls but I have no idea what you're looking for. Feel free to PM me and I can link you to photo albums, etc.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Savannah Blue Belle, Wed 1:26 pm


Behavior & Training > ducking her head

Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 11, '14 10:34am PST 
I'd address it two ways. The first being a basic classical conditioning/desensitization protocol. The second being training a more active stand.

To explain a bit, I think a lot of people make the mistake of creating a really blasé stays in obedience. It tends to be taught very formally and the exercise itself is quite formulaic. Basically, it can be quite boring for the dog. I would build anticipation of the release into the stand and make it a really exciting exercise. Think of it similarly to a start line stay in agility - most dogs are so focused on the obstacle in front of them that they couldn't care less about what the judge is doing.

Keep your criteria strong and easy to understand. Disallow any paw movement. Reward with play or something really exciting.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Cohen CD RE ADC SGDC FDCh CGN , Apr 11 10:34 am

Behavior & Training > Helping the Insecure Dog
Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 9, '14 7:37am PST 
Becoming dog-selective is pretty standard for a mature Aussie. Don't bother trying to point the finger at the various dog attacks when talking about his behaviour -- they may have attributed to his issue, but, again, it all falls into the realm of pretty normal with the breed.

With that said, I think I need to point out that you were aware of his personality and have set him up to fail on multiple occasions. No one is perfect of course. It's just vital to understand your role in how things have escalated.

The first thing I say to people with dog selective/reactive dogs is to write off your desire to have a happy-go-lucky pup who takes everything in stride. People dearly want their dogs to be BFFs with others because we love to watch them play happily. But the reality of the situation is your dog does not enjoy dogs invading his space. He likely never will enjoy this, and you can't train him otherwise. What you can do is train him to focus on you in the presence of other dogs and tolerate them for brief periods of time.

Regarding allowing warning snaps, while I feel that it is an appropriate response to a dog that has ignored his other signals, it's not appropriate for you to let his dog-dog interactions repeatedly reach that point. You should be able to pick up on his discomfort and step in/call him off before behaviour escalates. Remember: practice makes perfect, so the more he snaps the more he will continue to do so in the future.

Regarding the JRT, she sounds like yet another rude and pushy dog, and it sounds like yet another situation where you allowed for him to be pushed way beyond his comfort zone. His reaction was obviously inappropriate, but he shouldn't have been in that situation to start with. The dogs should have been on leash, separated by a gate, actively engaged away from each other, or in separate rooms.

Your story resonates with me because your Samson sounds a lot like Cohen. She's a wonderful dog who does not like other dogs in her face. She works closely with other dogs in sports like flyball and lives with another dog. She has learned that if she sees another strange dog out on a walk she is to come to me and get into work/focus mode until the other dog is gone. I reward her with work, play and food.

I also don't take her to dog parks because it's pretty much a given that some rude, obnoxious puppy will get into her face. She is patient and has self control but it's not infinite and it's unfair of me to ever set her up to fail like that.

I support Cohen by not putting her in situations where she is uncomfortable, and she supports me by tolerating the occasional stranger in her face if things go awry.

If you're having trouble managing the behaviour a trainer or behaviourist will be able to help cater advice to your individual situation. However I believe the most important thing in this situation is to disallow greetings with strange dogs and work on his focus on you when they're around.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Apr 11 5:21 am


Sports & Agility > Harness Help

Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 8, '14 7:20pm PST 
Yeah I just use a slip lead, if anything, for agility. You might also just get a light collar without tags for use just when in class.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Beowulf, Tue 12:47 am


Behavior & Training > Dog snapping twice this week..very scary..

Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 7, '14 5:17am PST 
double post - trying to fix link code
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Frankie, Apr 8 2:48 pm


Behavior & Training > Dog snapping twice this week..very scary..

Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 7, '14 5:16am PST 
It's foolish to think that you're faster than your dog. My thought is that if he truly wanted to make contact, he would have. What you saw was an elaborate threat display that could very well have escalated to a bite (or several). It's not good, of course, just... better.

As has already been said, he may be feeling physically or mentally off. Stress from the groomer could very well still be lingering in his system. A vet check is a great idea, but my guess is that you won't find anything physically wrong with him. [Ask your vet to check his thyroid.] Here's an article about how stress can linger in a dog's body and how to address it: The Cortisol Vacation

It sounds like a classic resource guarding issue which may have been exacerbated by stress. Talk to a trainer or behaviourist who is well versed in addressing resource guarding via classical conditioning and primarily uses rewards in their approach. In the interim, pick up this book: Mine by Jean Donaldson

It will help you set up exercises to address the guarding, starting with something simple and of low/no value and gradually building your way up to highly valuable items.

Also, try not to let him repeat his poor behaviour while you prepare to address it. No high value treats if you have to take them away from him. If he can eat the whole thing himself, put him in another room or a crate so he's not disturbed. Have him sleep in his crate.

Finally, work on some fun obedience/trick behaviours. It'll create a positive working history for both you and him and will help set you up for success in the next steps of addressing resource guarding.

Resource guarding is a very normal, very natural but very unwelcome part of dog behaviour. Luckily, it can be trained out to imperceptible levels. You may have to do periodic booster sessions going forward, but it's relatively simple to address.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Frankie, Apr 8 2:48 pm

Behavior & Training > My "poor" dogs...lol.
Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 6, '14 5:16am PST 
I do a lot of off leash walks with my dogs. They get plenty of dog time. When the leash is on it's because I have something I actually want to do -- it's my time more than the dog's. So, I don't allow sniffing, dawdling or marking while on leash either. My poor dogs!
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Risa W-FDM/MF RE RL1 CA CGC, Apr 8 6:22 am

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