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Can Anyone Give Me Some Info on Miniature Poodles?

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Riley

Canine Good- Citizen &- Therapy Dog
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 14, '10 10:50am PST 
My Aunt and Uncle own Miniature and Toy Poodles and think they are the greatest breeds. I was looking into getting a Standard Poodle but got really turned off by the idea of bloat--it's scary and expensive. So now I'm looking into a Miniature Poodle.

I wanted to know what are the good and bad things about miniature poodles, how social they are with other dogs and people, and what size (how tall and how heavy, also what gender) they are.

I would like to train this dog to be a therapy dog like my other dog. Any advice from real owners would be great!

Thanks!!
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Member Since
03/06/2010
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 15, '10 1:07pm PST 
The AKC breed standard gives the size of a Miniature Poodle as "15 inches or under at the highest point of the shoulders, with a minimum height in excess of 10 inches".

Other than that, count me in on your questions too! The Miniature Poodle is one of the breeds I'm considering and I'd also like to hear more about them-- both positive and negative-- from those who own them.

Wonder if this should be also asked in the "Choosing the Right Dog" forum? Seems more active there...
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Fozzie

Fozzie Bear, we- like to be held!
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 15, '10 9:45pm PST 
Hi there!

My owner was raised with toy and mini poodles and she has had wonderful experiences. Let me know how I can help!

First, selecting the right breeder is absolutely critical to being happy with your pup. Improperly bred poodles can have serious and expensive health issues. My mom got recommendations from the poodle club of america and did extensive research on the dam and sire, checking all papers, asking for proof of genetic testing and such. More on that once you have made up your mind, and oh, you will.

Don't tell my mom, but I have her wrapped around my little paw. My soft, fluffy coat, and absolutely sweet and loving disposition had her at hello. And hello it was because I have never barked. I'm too much of a gentleman for that! I am also one of the brightest dogs, mom had me house broken in 1 day, taught to sit in four days, and conquered stairs in two. So I learn really fast.

I happen to be more of a people pup, but I get along really well with other dogs, to the point where some of my neighbors who don't play well with others will talk to me! Some of my cousins are more outgoing, it really depends on what kind of personality you like. It's good to see a litter and think through what kind of companion you want. My mom was inspired by Cesar Millan and really wanted a calm, gentle, loving submissive doggy like me, but some folks would have really wanted my much more active brother!

Back to my downsides...well aside from the fact that some poodles are truly "ill bred" which can make them short tempered and neurotic, the only possible downside is the cost of grooming, which needs to be done every six weeks. You can learn to do it yourself, but really it's a pleasure to smell me when I come home. Also, did you know I don't smell bad when I'm wet? And that I don't shed? When I walk down the street my trot is like a light hearted dance and everyone smiles when they see me. So I think I have more good qualities than bad.

Of course. smile

You can see how tall I am in the picture. I'm nearly full grown and weigh a svelte 13.8 pounds. People are always surprised when they pick me up how tiny I am--I'm all hair!

Let me know if you need more help. I'm currently being neutered and posting this from the vet's office. Don't tell my mom, she misses me a lot and can't wait for me to come home!

Edited by author Mon Mar 15, '10 9:48pm PST

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Member Since
03/06/2010
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 15, '10 10:34pm PST 
Thanks for all the info Fozzie, you sound like pretty much my idea of the ideal dog! Is the calm-submissive personality common among Miniature Poodles? I'd definitely enjoy that kind of personality in a dog (and happen to be a fan of Cesar's show, too).

In your opinion, is poor breeding among Poodles a common enough problem that adopting a Poodle from the pound would be a risky idea? I have nothing at all against breeders, though I lean a bit more towards wanting to adopt from a shelter-- unless shelter Poodles are too big of a gamble in terms of health and temperament. If you don't mind me asking, about how much should a Miniature Poodle from a good breeder cost?

About how much exercise do you need, by the way? Would one walk a day and/or some play in a fenced yard be enough? Also, are you generally calm or active inside the house?

(Apologies to Riley for slightly hijacking her thread!)
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Fozzie

Fozzie Bear, we- like to be held!
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 15, '10 10:53pm PST 
Woof!

You can definitely find calm submissive mini poos! But you do have to seek them out, tell your breeder what you are looking for. Breeders tend to prefer really active pups so it works out well. My brother was pretty hyper and kept pushing at my mom when she came to the kennel. The breeder knew I was the one mom would want and mom spotted me pretty fast when she picked me up and I relaxed, put my head on her shoulder and slept while she talked to the breeder for 15 minutes! Just don't be afraid to walk away from any pup that won't suit your lifestyle, no matter how sorry for us you might feel, cause you aren't doing us a favor if you don't love us. Even a good pup like me had an accident on the first day red face and my sweet personality makes it impossible for my mom to get too mad. smile

In general pups from a good breeder should cost $1500-$2000 depending on age and lineage, but we live in the Bay Area which is pricey. I am a registered pup with Champion parents and genetically tested with certification that shows that I do not carry genes for hip displaysia, progressive retinal atrophy or patella degeneration. So my mom was willing to pay more upfront to save on worry about vet bills later.

Exercise: I'm a 7 month old puppy so I have a lot of energy still but I get tired. I am happiest with 2 20 minute cesar style, structured, brisk walks along with another 15 mins of "sniff" time on both walks. Mom also plays with me for at least an hour in the evening and why not cause I'm so cute! Play time includes training because I'm smart and like mental challenges. Mom also has a job that allows her to work from hom in the afternoons so I am only in my kennel half a day, and over time when I'm good, Mom will start taking me to work! Woof!

If I don't get my exercise my puppyness gets the best of me. At those times mom encourages me to lie down or rest in my kennel for 10-15 mins. But mom really likes to see me active and playful so she's ok with it. This first week I could tell she was tired!

Edited by author Mon Mar 15, '10 11:02pm PST

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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 17, '10 9:28am PST 
I breed and show both mini and toy poodles. In my opinion, finding a great poodle companion thru rescue and/or a shelter is the most perfect way to go. Normally, since the pup will be older, you can see most serious health conditions... things like poor temperament, loose knees, blindness, etc., will be obvious.
Are you aware that most show breeders will often have retired adults to place? Usually there is only a nominal fee and these dogs will be completely health tested, trained and ready to devote the rest of their life (which is long in the average poodle!) to their new owners. They are not normally that old, either. I recently placed a one year old male who had just finished his championship but was a carrier for one of the eye problems. He will NEVER get that problem, but was not something I wanted to use for breeding. I have also placed females as young as 4 years old who have finished their breeding career and now deserve a great retirement home.
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Member Since
03/06/2010
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 17, '10 11:06pm PST 
Fozzie:
Thanks again for all the info, you've been a great help! Don't worry, I'm definitely not afraid to walk away from a dog who doesn't suit me-- the way I figure, if the dog and I aren't a good match then it'll just be stressful for us both and that's no good for the dog either. One accident on the first day is nothing! smile

$1500-2000 huh... that's a little more than I expected, though understandable for the area and great lines. I'm in the Los Angeles area so I doubt things would be much cheaper around here.

Hope you get taken to work soon! I'm hoping to take my future dog to work too, once he/she is well-trained enough.


Toto:
Thanks for your info, too! Glad to know that a rescue/shelter Poodle would be a good option, then. At what age do loose knees and blindness tend to show up? I.e., is there any age at which one could say that if those problems haven't appeared yet, they probably won't in the future? Or can the onset happen at any time?

I knew that show breeders might sometimes have retired adults available for placement, but I didn't know it was such a common thing. That's great; I'm not set on a puppy (in fact I'd almost prefer an adult) so I'll definitely consider that option-- would the fact that I've never owned a dog before be a strike against me, though? (Frankly, I couldn't blame the breeder if it is: if I had a retired champion to place, I'd hesitate to place him/her in an inexperienced home.) If you don't mind me asking, what would be a ballpark estimate for the fee for adopting a retired adult from a breeder? I'm not trying to lowball or look for the cheapest price, just curious to get a general idea of things since I'm new to all this.
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 18, '10 4:48am PST 
I normally find the home is more important than the price with my adults... I usually do around $500 or up, depending on if I do the neuter/spay or the new owner does. I certainly wouldn't have a problem with someone being a first time dog owner and taking one of my retirees. I would actually feel good about that since I know the dog is already trained and past the stage where it could be screwed up, temperamently speaking.
Knees can be checked by a vet at about a year old. Eyes are more of an issue... PRA doesn't usually show up until 5 years or more.
A good, well bred poodle here in the Northeast runs about $800 - $1200.
Check out some of my photos and my family's photos on our pages... you can click on my photo to be taken there. You will get some idea of our energy and the things we like to do from those photos.
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Fozzie

Fozzie Bear, we- like to be held!
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 19, '10 2:46pm PST 
toto is so right, adult poodles are a great choice for a first time owner. I was 7 months when mom got me--early enough to learn tricks and interactions but not young enough to have to be walked every two hours. I slept through the night on my first night!

Rescue dogs are also great, but mom knew up front she didn't want to take risks with behavioral issues. It's great to have so many options to find a friend to love!

snuggles,
fozzie
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Member Since
03/06/2010
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 1, '10 11:26am PST 
Thank you both again! Sorry for the late response.

Toto, that's good to know that you'd be OK with a first-time dog owner adopting one of your retirees, and good point that the dog would then be past the initial training stage and harder to accidentally mess up. If I do decide on a Miniature Poodle breed-wise, I'll definitely consider a retiree from a good local breeder then.
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