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put an aggressive dog to sleep? HELP!

Whether a dog dies, is lost or stolen, or must be placed in a new home, this is the place to gather together to give and receive love and support when you experience the loss of a beloved dog.

  
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Barnes - (01-03 to- 06-28-12)

Balls, lets play- ball.
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 30, '12 9:16pm PST 
Sorry, daddy was a little out of it and didn't realize it was old post.

Edited by author Sat Jun 30, '12 9:28pm PST

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Member Since
04/24/2013
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 24, '13 12:18pm PST 
Aggressive Cane Corso

Hello, I'm writing in hopes I could find some support. I have a male corso (Leo) who I've had since he was a baby. I actually have his mother (Cashiss) who is an awesome girl. Well, I've been struggling with Leo's aggression for quite some time now. I've gotten him neutered, in kennel behavioral modification training, and have even tried medicine. Let doesn't like kids, but he tolerated my 11 year old for a long while. She's able to kiss, hug and play with him but today she grabbed his paw and he bit her. This is his 6th bite! The first time he bit her was when he was a smaller pup. So he's bit her twice. Another incident was when this lady was looking to work with him on his aggression, she had an teenager and when we went to meet him she called her daughter over to greet him despite my previous concerns about kids, etc. He bit her daughter and broke skin. Luckily I wasn't sued! But she was okay. The next bite was when my brother kept reaching his hand into Leo's crate when he was over my sister's house. Unfortunately, I wasn't around but my sister told me that Leo kept growling and my brother (stupidly) kept putting his hand in the crate. The next time was when I sent him to in boarding training, he's not comfortable with people touching behind him and when the lady did, he bit her leg, but didn't break skin. Lastly, he bit a guy that came into his kennel at night at the training facility. Please understand that I am trying everything to help him, but I don't know what else to do. Clearly he needs to be in a home with no kids AND no other dogs because he gets into it with his mom. She won't back down so we've been getting caught in the middle...not good cause my oldest got bit the other day. I talked to the trainer today and she suggested that I put him down. I'd feel like a murderer and it's sooo sad. I'm in tears as I write this. I don't want to put him down but also don't want to pass him on to someone else. If anyone has any advice for me, I would really appreciate it.

Thank you
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Mr. Jake the- Beagle

I am Murphy's- Law Embodied! <3- Me!
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 25, '13 9:07am PST 
Guest you are better off starting a new post then digging up an ancient one.

But here's an article a dogster member wrote about their experience with an aggressive dog.

http://www.dogster.com/lifestyle/i-had-to-euthanize-my-aggressiv e-dog-alapaha-blue-blood-bulldog

From what you've said... the dog sounds dangerous. But starting a new post may lead to more responses.
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Shiver Me- Timbers- "Charlie"

My Little Dog, a- heartbeat at my- feet.<3
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 25, '13 1:33pm PST 
Have you considered looking for a Veterinary Behaviorist?

This dog sounds incredibly uncomfortable with people handling him, and under socialized. In fact, he sounds incredibly similar to my old foster dog - difference being breeds. My foster dog was a small hound, so probably easier to handle, but he was aggressive in very very similar situations and bit multiple people as well.

While you're figuring out what to do, I would keep him muzzled(basket style muzzle) in the presence of your kids, and I would have him put in a separate room, crated when guests are over to keep him from feeling overwhelmed.

Sending him away to Board and Train situations will ONLY make the situation worse and make him more uncomfortable with strange people. I would not ever recommend that training situation, much less for a dog that is clearly very uncomfortable being handled by anyone else but you.

Have you had a thorough Vet check done yet? If not, do so, and make sure it's not a health issue too.

I'll let you know.. I DID manage to work past my fosters issues, but it took MONTHS and it took daily training, and it took my building up his trust in me and getting him comfortable first, slowly, with me handling him, and then eventually bringing one other person at a time into the mix. It took quite a while of working on those issues and managing him so he COULDN'T bite anyone, before I finally managed to get him past them. Were there still situations he was uncomfortable in? Absolutely. But he found a furever home, and he learned how to bark to express his discomfort.

Your brother, putting his hands in the crate while Leo was growling, was taunting a dog that was already giving a clear warning indication. The good news is Leo appears to give warning signals. The bad news, is your brother continued to taunt the poor dog and forced him to resort to a bite.

Whatever you decide, good luck.. hug
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Nare

Woo-woo- whineybutt
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 26, '13 9:34am PST 
Guest your dog is not at fault. It is YOU who is letting your 11 year old child harass the dog. It is YOU who is letting your brother harass the dog. It is YOU who is letting sorry excuses for trainer harass the dog. This is YOUR dog. If you honestly cared for him you would not put him in situations that you know he would fail. Hes proven time and time again that he is not comfortable with strangers, with kids, and with people messing around his crate. Why do you let it happen then ?
You brought this dog into the world-- you even own his mother. You should own up for it. Where are all the other pups ? 80% of this behavior is genetic and before these puppies were born it seems they were given a life sentence from poor breeding practice.

Honestly he seems like he would be manageable if you stopped people from being immature twats around your dog. Tell people to leave him alone, don't look, don't touch. Making a billion people pet him is not going to make him like kids or like people.
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Koby

I'm a big brat- and I don't care- :)
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 26, '13 12:34pm PST 
I agree you should start your own post with this. You said you've tried medicine. What kind? have you had his thyroid tested?
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Member Since
05/02/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu May 2, '13 5:56am PST 
There is a thing called Springer rage, called so because of frequency of it in Springer spaniels. The dogs attack unprovoked. They can be normal one minute and attack the next. Most recent information is that it may be related to epilepsy, that the dog experiences a seizure or a small electrical charge misfiring in the brain which causes them to feel threatened and they attack. The next moment they are perfectly fine. I don't know if seizure meds help this or not but have a friend who's Gordon setter attacked me recently after he had attacked her twice. Just sitting there playing with a toy and I'm standing in the room. He looked up at me and I knew something was off. I backed out of the room quickly but he got me in the back of the leg. Read up on springer rage and talk with your vet. It is dangerous because unlike an aggressive dog, there is no reason for the attack. The other thing you may want to do is send off a blood test to Dr Jean Dodds of Hemopet in CA for a true thyroid test. Sometimes thyroid deficiency can cause aggression. She is the only one who knows how to truly check thyroid. All the other tests are not accurate. Good luck.
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Baxter

1302078
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 17, '13 9:07pm PST 
First, I am sorry for your situation. I can empathize. I have rescued animals all of amy life (well, for 53 years at least).
Four years ago I rescued a runt pit bull terrier who had been abandoned (put off) by her mom and repeatedly attacked by siblings. I discovered her dam and sire had both been championship fighters . She was fearful and anxious. (Who wouldn't have been with a solid muscle 80 pound mom and a 100 lb monster dad?) With lots of training, patience and love she seemed better -- but never "right". It was part PTSD (I am sure) and part that she was always mentally weak - probably sensed by the mama dog right away, which is why she was starved, dehydrated and attacked as a little pup. While as sweet as could be 99% of the time there was another side that could look at you with clueless eyes and another that was total red zone. She also had some focal seizures that were infrequent enough that the vet would do nothing about it. She was a cuddle bunny with us and the cats, but not with dogs. At almost five years we had a cluster of events that were stressful for all. While on lead, she broke loose and went after a man walking past the front of the house. She attacked a neighbor dog another time when one of my adult sons thought it was ok to let her go into the back yard off leash.
We had to juggle animals whenever family members brought their dogs (the timeframe for warning before attacks was minimal and we feared for safety of kids in the way should such a thing happen). Adults had been bitten numerous times breaking up dogfights. It was horrible for all.

Finally, after slipping out an unlocked door unnoticed, she went after a man and his two dogs walking by the house one night. She would not be a good citizen, despite twice a day long walks, plenty of company and repeated attempts to help her adapt to being around other dogs.

The decision, after three strikes against her with humans involved, was gut wrenching. We had to put emotion aside and think of the safety of humans in the future as well as the growing liability. There are so many inbred and overbred dogs (esp of ASPBTs in NC). The kids are still upset but I know putting her down gently and lovingly was the best decision for her…after all, Rainbow Bridge or not, the animal was out of her psychological schizophrenic hell and at peace.

I have to deal with death almost daily. Many times I wish we could offer the same peaceful exit to tortured humans. Death is not an enemy. It is natural and sometimes (at least in the case of terminal or mentally ill animals) hastening it is in everyone's best interests.

I am grateful that Baxter is calm, alert, well-adjusted and healthy. He will miss Lily but at least still has his cats, sulfate tortoise and flying squirrel friend (plus anyone else he meets when we are at home or out at a park, pet store or coffee shop).
[notify]
Baxter

1302078
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 17, '13 9:07pm PST 
First, I am sorry for your situation. I can empathize. I have rescued animals all of amy life (well, for 53 years at least).
Four years ago I rescued a runt pit bull terrier who had been abandoned (put off) by her mom and repeatedly attacked by siblings. I discovered her dam and sire had both been championship fighters . She was fearful and anxious. (Who wouldn't have been with a solid muscle 80 pound mom and a 100 lb monster dad?) With lots of training, patience and love she seemed better -- but never "right". It was part PTSD (I am sure) and part that she was always mentally weak - probably sensed by the mama dog right away, which is why she was starved, dehydrated and attacked as a little pup. While as sweet as could be 99% of the time there was another side that could look at you with clueless eyes and another that was total red zone. She also had some focal seizures that were infrequent enough that the vet would do nothing about it. She was a cuddle bunny with us and the cats, but not with dogs. At almost five years we had a cluster of events that were stressful for all. While on lead, she broke loose and went after a man walking past the front of the house. She attacked a neighbor dog another time when one of my adult sons thought it was ok to let her go into the back yard off leash.
We had to juggle animals whenever family members brought their dogs (the timeframe for warning before attacks was minimal and we feared for safety of kids in the way should such a thing happen). Adults had been bitten numerous times breaking up dogfights. It was horrible for all.

Finally, after slipping out an unlocked door unnoticed, she went after a man and his two dogs walking by the house one night. She would not be a good citizen, despite twice a day long walks, plenty of company and repeated attempts to help her adapt to being around other dogs.

The decision, after three strikes against her with humans involved, was gut wrenching. We had to put emotion aside and think of the safety of humans in the future as well as the growing liability. There are so many inbred and overbred dogs (esp of ASPBTs in NC). The kids are still upset but I know putting her down gently and lovingly was the best decision for her…after all, Rainbow Bridge or not, the animal was out of her psychological schizophrenic hell and at peace.

I have to deal with death almost daily. Many times I wish we could offer the same peaceful exit to tortured humans. Death is not an enemy. It is natural and sometimes (at least in the case of terminal or mentally ill animals) hastening it is in everyone's best interests.

I am grateful that Baxter is calm, alert, well-adjusted and healthy. He will miss Lily but at least still has his cats, sulfate tortoise and flying squirrel friend (plus anyone else he meets when we are at home or out at a park, pet store or coffee shop).
[notify]
Baxter

1302078
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 17, '13 9:11pm PST 
First, I am sorry for your situation. I can empathize. I have rescued animals all of amy life (well, for 53 years at least).
Four years ago I rescued a runt pit bull terrier who had been abandoned (put off) by her mom and repeatedly attacked by siblings. I discovered her dam and sire had both been championship fighters . She was fearful and anxious. (Who wouldn't have been with a solid muscle 80 pound mom and a 100 lb monster dad?) With lots of training, patience and love she seemed better -- but never "right". It was part PTSD (I am sure) and part that she was always mentally weak - probably sensed by the mama dog right away, which is why she was starved, dehydrated and attacked as a little pup. While as sweet as could be 99% of the time there was another side that could look at you with clueless eyes and another that was total red zone. She also had some focal seizures that were infrequent enough that the vet would do nothing about it. She was a cuddle bunny with us and the cats, but not with dogs. At almost five years we had a cluster of events that were stressful for all. While on lead, she broke loose and went after a man walking past the front of the house. She attacked a neighbor dog another time when one of my adult sons thought it was ok to let her go into the back yard off leash.
We had to juggle animals whenever family members brought their dogs (the timeframe for warning before attacks was minimal and we feared for safety of kids in the way should such a thing happen). Adults had been bitten numerous times breaking up dogfights. It was horrible for all.

Finally, after slipping out an unlocked door unnoticed, she went after a man and his two dogs walking by the house one night. She would not be a good citizen, despite twice a day long walks, plenty of company and repeated attempts to help her adapt to being around other dogs.

The decision, after three strikes against her with humans involved, was gut wrenching. We had to put emotion aside and think of the safety of humans in the future as well as the growing liability. There are so many inbred and overbred dogs (esp of ASPBTs in NC). The kids are still upset but I know putting her down gently and lovingly was the best decision for her…after all, Rainbow Bridge or not, the animal was out of her psychological schizophrenic hell and at peace.

I have to deal with death almost daily. Many times I wish we could offer the same peaceful exit to tortured humans. Death is not an enemy. It is natural and sometimes (at least in the case of terminal or mentally ill animals) hastening it is in everyone's best interests.

I am grateful that Baxter is calm, alert, well-adjusted and healthy. He will miss Lily but at least still has his cats, sulfate tortoise and flying squirrel friend (plus anyone else he meets when we are at home or out at a park, pet store or coffee shop).
[notify]
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