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Biking and Hiking

Running, catching, leaping; this is the forum to discuss dog sports and agility training with other active pups!

  
Kye

I'm like- Einstein only- hairier.
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 17, '13 11:04pm PST 
I've decided to try and lose some weight... ok, a lot of weight, and I've been doing a lot of group dog walks with a group of ladies from facebook. My neighbor had a garage sale today and I managed to convince him to sell me his bike. Kye and Carbon came on the maiden voyage and we had a great time! I biked over to the Menchies with a friend of mine and we ate our frozen yogurt outside at the tables. The boys were complimented by a lady for their superb behavior off-leash in a busy area, which as a dog mom makes me very proud.
I'd really love to get the boys backpacks so they can carry their own water, I was wondering if anyone else has used doggy backpacks before? It seems like they would be too hot on warm days and too bulky to run beside the bike or play in the bush with, would it just be smarter to get saddlebags for my bike rather than a backpack?
Also, biking with 2 dogs, safer to have both dogs on same side of bike or one on each side? I feel more comfortable with both dogs on one side but they don't run at the same pace so it can get pretty tricky sometimes, does anyone have any tips as to how to run 2 dogs on one bike? Or even any hardware that may help (such as leads, clips or anything)
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 18, '13 8:08pm PST 
Personally, I don't combine backpacks and long distance running like biking just because I feel like running with the extra weight would be hard on joints. I don't know how much effect it would really have, but I'm paranoid about joints/hips, and I feel like you'd have to shorten the run because the dog would tire so much more quickly. For hiking though, I've found backpacks to be great. The dogs can carry their own water, and the packs get lighter as the hike goes on since they're drinking the water along the way.

I've never biked with two dogs, but the people I know who do have one on each side. I'm a big fan of the Springer attachment. One can be placed on either side for two dogs. Really does a great job of negating sudden, unexpected pulls. A cheaper option would be using a bungee cord/leash to absorb some pulling.
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Kye

I'm like- Einstein only- hairier.
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 18, '13 11:29pm PST 
Oh God. I WISH they'd pull! They both heel perfectly to the bike, the only problem I've been having is my older dog cant keep up and lags behind my younger dog. Just makes it hard to run both leashes. I'm thinking if I use my flexilead for the old guy it should let him go at his own pace a bit better.
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Rexy

I dig in mud- puddles!
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 19, '13 1:19pm PST 
Seconding Onyx's caution about biking with a backpack. I would save the pack for hikes. At a fast trot with the bike, even a well-fitted pack is going to have some movement to it which wouldn't be comfortable for any extended periods of time.

If your older dog is having a tough time keeping up on the bike, then it sounds like maybe this isn't the right activity for him. Flexi-leash + bike is a pretty scary combination, definitely wouldn't advise that! If he gets too far behind and stops then you are going to get pulled off the bike.
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Kye

I'm like- Einstein only- hairier.
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 19, '13 7:41pm PST 
@Rexy> Yeah I didn't know if the flexilead was a yay or nay, he doesn't usually stop cold turkey on me but I can see how a longer lead could get dicey. I've decided against the backpack all together, I can get myself a backpack and carry all our stuff big grin As for biking not being the right activity for him I agree but my other dog adores it and Kye gets really mopey if I leave him at home. He'd rather struggle through it than get left behind. I bought a bike trailer (like the one you pull kids in) so when he gets tired I can let him ride in style!

Thanks for your tips and info guys!

Edited by author Fri Jul 19, '13 7:42pm PST

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Milton

Im just a little- guy
 
 
Barked: Sat Jul 20, '13 3:01pm PST 
Kye if you are interested in loosing weight, adding a bike trailer will burn more calories. The problem is some dogs are not comfortable in these. They can move around and tip the bike trailer over. Seen it. I have also seen people in my town with dogs in trailers and the dogs look comfortable. You should gradually train your dog to ride in a trailer. I did this for my dog with his bike basket.

way to go Congratulations on your journey to a healthy lifestyle. If my dog was bigger he would totally carry his own water. Look into ruff wear for the packs. they are the leading outdoor company for dog gear. The packs give your dog a job and any dogs thrive with this.
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Kye

I'm like- Einstein only- hairier.
 
 
Barked: Sat Jul 20, '13 6:20pm PST 
@Milton> I made sure I got a really sturdy trailer (I sat in it and wiggled like mad) and I'm confident Kye will sit like a good boy for the ride. He's been trained to sit in front of me on horseback and ride safely on a quad so him being a good boy isn't a worry, thanks for the great tips!!
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Kato

Birds!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jul 23, '13 6:14am PST 
I use a hydration pack when I bike with Kato. I wear it on my back while I bike and Kato runs. I bring a little collapsible bowl with me and share the water with him.
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Milton

Im just a little- guy
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 24, '13 11:04pm PST 
I meant *many dogs.

Packs are not for everydog. Of course dogs with joint issues or back problems should not carry weight. Senior dogs probably should not either. Healthy fit dogs with good joint health are great candidates.

I don't think they are good for running. They are great for hiking.

I don't put a back pack on my dog because he is older, small and has a funky gait.
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Bianca CGC- TT HIC Thd- ♥

What big ears- you have...
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 26, '13 1:12pm PST 
Packs are nice but you have to build up to carrying weight slowly, just like you should build up distance/duration for hikes or biking.
Some people do run or bike with packs on their dogs. It really depends on the dog, how much they'd be carrying, and the speed/distance I think, and as I mentioned building up slowly to the activity level and weight so they can build up their muscle and tolerance.

I think that Ruffwear's Singletrak pack is probably the best for faster activities.

It's also a good one for if you want something that won't stick out very far to the sides or impede movement through brush. The packs are fairly slim and they don't hang down at all like a regular type of pack.

There are bike attachments you can buy for biking with dogs safely. Some of them allow you to attach two dogs to the bike as well, others you have to buy a second attachment to do that.
I would also suggest buying a mirror that attaches to the handlebar end, so you can keep an eye on your dog(s) while moving without having to keep looking down or back (it's safer if you can keep looking forward.)

If you want to carry more water for them you could get a bike basket/rack so you can carry some extra water on the bike.

Edited by author Fri Jul 26, '13 1:13pm PST

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