GO!

The dog won't shut up

Small dogs have big personality! This is the place to talk up your favorite small breeds, ask questions, and share tips and stories. Be sure to visit our Small Dog Breeds area for profiles of all your favorite small dog breeds, featured articles, and more!

  
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Gamma

Waitin' at the- Rainbow Bridge
 
 
Barked: Tue Jul 24, '12 11:59pm PST 
ive also noticed you have not added her to your dogster page. maybe you also need to talk out your resentment against this dog.
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Foxxy

Pocket Wolf
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 1:47am PST 
Yeah Foxxy is a barker too. It's just that Chis are bred to alarm bark. So are schnauzers, actually. Among schnauz lovers, there is a saying " If a schnauzer can't bark, it will explode" It's sort of one of the vast number of things that they were for.

small dogs have this register that is in the realm of a baby's voice, so lots of people have tons of trouble with our own instinct. small dog voices put us on alert the same as a baby cry, or a child's scream. We are programmed by nature to to react to that by locating the cause of irritation and mitigating it. The problem is that when the dog will never grow out of that high pitch, because it is just a tiny dog, and that dog can bark literally at 110 decibels, It drives people into anxiety and anger. The anxiety is anticipation of the bark, anger at the execution of it.

With chis, they have radar ears. They have ears that can echolocate. They can hear things that I swear only cats and bats are supposed to be able to hear. YOu actually might not know all of what is triggering your dog. The first step is to work with the stuff you know. The doorbell, the neighbor opening his door across the hall, being allowed to look out the windows and react, those are the most common. It's our job to teach the dog that nonverbal communication is better. That is a lesson that wolfs have to teach their puppies too.

To signal outside, a paw touch, or a bell for them to ring prevents barking for attention. Don't let them get territorial by letting them gaze out the window. If they must gaze let them look at the backyard, where there is less likely to be stimulating things.

Teach your dog that the doorbell means "go to your box" otherwise he will be excited by your haste to answer the door and fueled by your excitement at a guest in your territory. train that right, and anytime the doorbell rings he will go there and hopefully be calm when he comes out. You have to b ecreative like that with a barker.

Shush is a command similar to heel and can be trained in the same way. What you are really asking for is for absolute attention. A dog that is heeling walks with it's attention 100% on the handler as it walks. A dog cannot bark and heel at the same time. Similarly A distracted dog cannot shush.

What you will find is that there are different kinds of barking, but the kind that annoys people, this is caused almost entirely by aggression or frustration in combination with drive. drive is the will to get something to happen accomplished. This could be hunting a rabbit, or it could be getting the human to pay attention to him by jumping and barking. Think about a dog seeing a rabbit on leash vs. that dog being allowed to chase it unrestrained. There is no doubt the natural tendancy of the dog will be to silence unrestrained, and barking when leashed. It's frustration is screaming at you as the handler/master, to let the dog get his rabbit. That's the barking. The dog doesn't care the kind of attention, if you pay attention of any kind, you are justifying the behavior. Aggressive barking comes with a whole list of nonverbal postures and most certainly needs to be nipped in the bud. The combo of all three is what makes on-leash barking so bad, for example. It's the same with being allowed to bark out the window or at the door.

The dog will bark because there is something that it wants, it's not getting it, and it is asking your help to relieve that want or need. It will do that by manipulation, no problem. Don't be manipulated. Obsessive barking is a frustration need for stimulation or attention. Your dog wants you to also be reacting, ideally to fix his frustration. Unfortunately, your solutions might not be the same as his. He wants you to open the door to kill the rabbit, you think you want him to stop barking at it, but what you really want is for him not to pay attention to it. This is why you better not yell at him to stop, otherwise he is going to think 1)you are ineffective to relieve his frustration thus not being a leader 2)you also want that rabbit and 3)you are also barking. The key to handling a barker is very simply to train it in ways that allow him to solve his issues and your issues nonverbally and you do that by showing him that your solutions should be preferable and desirable. Bark at the rabbit? Oh look, here, chase this rawhide ballball! The dog is quiet and calm, praise him "good shush. shush. that's right."

The citronella sprays, water spritzers, and e-collar etc, these are just treating the symptom, not truly solving the root problem. They can be effective initally, even long term but there is going to have to be training, and consistency.

Edited by author Wed Jul 25, '12 1:58am PST

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Joush

1259234
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 2:31am PST 
how long did you get him?? is it possible the tooth issue or something else??
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Princesse- Lily CGN

I am RoyalChi!
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 5:52am PST 
way to go awesome post, Foxxy. Unfortunately, the OP has not posted in a few days , so we may never know the outcome of this situationfrown
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Lucille

I am the Sock- Bandit!!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 6:06am PST 
I agree, really thoughtful and helpful post, Foxxy. You should save that one for future small dog barking questions. big grin

Some dogs can bark in a perfect heel. It was one of my main issues training Lucille early on for heel and even stays. She barks when she is concentrating hard. She'll look up at me intently and bark during heel. Oh so much fun! wink It's not very common, but some dogs do that. First I had to work on training the heel and stay and then part of my criteria was getting her to shush while she was heeling or staying.

It's also hard for most dogs to bark in a down position. Lu's a big barker and I trained speak/shush as a pair, and if she continues after I acknowledge the source and cue quiet, I ask for a down. That helps. This is a tough issue for any dog who barks, big or small. It requires loads of patience as you explained so well the reasons why.
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Dingo

All business no- play, I have a- job to do
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 11:00am PST 
I'm sorry have not come on in the past few days. I have been dealing with a lot of very stressfull issues at the moment and so haven't been doing well physically and have had to step away from this post, because it is a stressfull one for me. But I am doing a bit better today and so thought deserved a response.

My husband because of the barking and my stress levels (and yes a bit of resentment towards her) he has passed her onto his parents for a couple of days till I can calm back down and get my health back in order.

I am planning on contacting a behaviorist to help with her barking and hopefully she can help us resolve the issue. I can deal with her growling and teeth chattering it is just the high piched yap that I can't take anymore. And yes I have gotten to a point that I yell at her every time she does it because I have hit my limit. So I realize I am probably making it worse, but I've tried everything. Their is no option of rehoming her because my husband is adament on keeping her, and I don't need that argument.

Everyone here has given some great tips and I have taken them all into consideration and will bringing them up to the behaviorist when she comes.

In regards to someone mentioning that I haven't made a dogster page for her, its because I simply don't know how to make multiple without making another account, also I simply don't see the point. I'm not on here for her
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Gamma

Waitin' at the- Rainbow Bridge
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 12:01pm PST 
its easy to add another dog! and maybe managing her account will help your resentment towards her. OKAY! step one: locate the black bar at the top of your screen. it should say "Hello,__>your name
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Dingo

All business no- play, I have a- job to do
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 12:08pm PST 
Sorry posted before was finished. Having a bit of computer trouble. I only made a profile for my dog Dingo just as a track of his SD training and progress.

Maybe it would help me cope with her I don't know. But I do need to keep things as simple as possible right now. So I don't know if keeping two dog profiles would be too much or not, but I could give it a try if someone could tell me if someone could explain how?
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Gamma

Waitin' at the- Rainbow Bridge
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 1:27pm PST 
lol i tried! it did nt post though. =/ oksy let me try again.

the black bar at the top. click "account" and open it to a new tab. look though the choices there #7. should say "would you like to add anouther dog? [add them here]" or something like that. anyway you click on the link and its just like doing dingos originality. and no its not too hard. i run Gammas and Harmonys. after that first time its just choosing who to post as. lol
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Miso

like the gravy!
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 3:27pm PST 
I think that everyone has great training tips and it's good that you plan on working with a behaviouralist.

I have a chihuahua who is very non-barky and people are always shocked by how quiet she is. You shouldn't think of this as a "small dog" or breed problem.I think that if you just see it as a regular training issue that any dog might have it'll be way easier to see the light at the end of the tunnel, even if it feel very far away.
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