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Member Since
09/25/2013
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 25, '13 5:57pm PST 
So Im getting a husky in a few weeks. The lady is holding on to her while im out of town. She is 4 months old, is that still an ok age to earn her trust and have her see me as Pack leader. My girlfriend wants a little puppy but I dont want to go through the potty training stage. Any and all advice would be helpful
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Lexus

shy girl
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 26, '13 6:17am PST 
4 months old is still a pup that will need training. Huskies are a lot of work no matter the age. You will still have to potty train because your house will be new to the pup, so you will have to train him where to go and where not to go.
A ton of other training comes with a 4 month old pup also. 4 months old is not to old to have a good trusting bond between you and the dog.....I dont think any age is to late really, there are tons of rescue dogs who are much older and form the same bond as a young pup would. It just takes time. I got my pup Lexus when she was 4 months, I treated her as she was just a young pup and potty trained her just the same.
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Member Since
09/25/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 26, '13 4:30pm PST 
Awesome, Thanks for the input. I have dreamed of owning a husky but the girlfriend was skeptical and apparently my degree in Animal Biology wasnt enough reassurance to her that the puppy would be fine. Have you ever put your pup in "doggy Daycare"? Im considering it while im at work so she can get very socialized.
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Mika

blue/brown eyed- girl!
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 27, '13 6:12am PST 
No I haven't, i'm a stay at home mom, my husband works so I am here with my huskies all day. But doggie day care could definitely be a good idea, but my suggestion would be to make sure you do a lot research on the daycare you choose, and go with your gut feeling about the people managing it, make sure you trust them with your pup.
It was always my dream to own Huskies to, they are amazing dogs, beautiful incredibly smart high energy dogs. As long as you fit their lifestyle, their lifestyle will fit you. smile
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Lexus

shy girl
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 27, '13 6:13am PST 
oops I answered that with the wrong dog.....sorry BOL!!!
the above response was from me laugh out loudlaugh out loud
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Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 27, '13 12:15pm PST 
There are some red flags here... It may be in your best interest to back out of this deal, research, regroup, and then get a dog.

Going in order of your post, who is "the lady?" Dogs should come from reputable, ethical breeders (or shelters or rescues, but they do not "hold" dogs so that's not the case here). Not families who had an "oops" litter, not the nice lady down the street who thought Fifi should have "just one litter" before she was spayed, and absolutely never people who just seem to have puppies for sale from some mysterious source.

You and your girlfriend (and anyone else in the house) need to be on the same page before a dog enters the picture. Anything else is a set up for a bad time. You will most likely have to do some degree of house training regardless of age, since dogs do not necessarily generalize house training. An older dog may also panic at the change of routine and be prone to accidents. A puppy (anything under a year, honestly) simply won't know what house training is. Older dogs are typically less work, but there will be work no matter what.

Four months old is a fine time to bring a puppy home. If the breeder has kept her litter past 8 weeks, the breeder should be actively socializing them. A puppy can go home as young as 8 weeks, and is physically able to be away from it's mother at 6, but it is not good to take them so young, to the point of being illegal in many states. Whether it's better to get a puppy at 8 weeks and start socializing yourself, or let the breeder keep the pup until 12 weeks for extra time with the litter while socializing is hotly debated. I lean toward basing it on the individual situation.

Regardless, your dog will bond with you no matter what age you bring them home. Mine were 6 months (town shelter), 4 years (private rescue), 2 years (direct owner surrender), and 6 years (direct owner surrender) old at the time of adoption. No problems anywhere. It's a different sort of work bringing an adult home, but there is no less love.

There is no need for your dog to see you as "pack leader." This training methodology is dated, severely inaccurate, and even dangerous.

A degree in animal biology is not the same as researching breeds and dog ownership. Huskies are tough, and not typically recommended for first time owners. They are extremely smart yet difficult to train, extremely energetic, and typically can not be exercised by conventional means (fetch in the back yard, running off leash, swimming, etc). They have a tendency to be mouthy, frequently have separation anxiety, resource guard, it is not uncommon for them to be dog aggressive and they are frequently same sex aggressive. I'm all good with that, and enjoy the good points like no barking (the howling and screaming don't bother me), wash & wear coat, general aloofness, athleticism, problem-solving skills (which do include opening most doors and containers) and ability to keep up with my busy life.

I've worked in several different daycares. I would not send my dogs to a daycare I did not work at - and I would not leave my dogs unattended at some of the daycares I have worked at. It's more of an energy outlet than socialization, depending on the daycare. Most have a core group of dogs who attend with little variation, so your dog ends up with the same group every time. It is valuable, but it should not be mistaken for broad-spectrum socialization. I have known dogs who are considered dog aggressive in the outside world of strangers, who could attend daycare with a stable group of dogs they knew.

If you will need daycare, I recommend finding the facility before you bring the dog home. Make sure there is a good place you can safely send your dog nearby, so you don't end up with a dog and nowhere for it to go. Then adopt an adult from a rescue who fosters their dogs. That way you know beyond a reasonable doubt that the dog will get along with other dogs. There is no guarantee with a puppy, especially in a breed known for DA and SSA.

Edited by author Fri Sep 27, '13 12:26pm PST

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