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Hoping to adopt a wolfdog

This is a special section for dogs needing new homes and for inspiring stories of dogs that have found their furever home through Dogster or through the love and energy of rescuers. This is also the place to discuss shelters, rescue organizations, rescue strategies, issues, solutions, etc. and how we can all help in this critical endeavor. Remember that we are all here for the love of dog! If you are posting about a dog that needs a new home, please put your location in the topic of your thread so those close by can find you! Make sure to check out Dogster's dog adoption center!

  
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Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 27, '13 7:58pm PST 
I see you said you were looking into adopting. smile There are many good wolfdogs that are in need of homes thru different rescue organizations.

I adopted my first wolfdog (a mid content) when I was 15. He was an assisted rescue thru the Texas Alaskan Malamute Rescue (he can be seen under Monty in their year 2000 happy tails section). I lived in a regular house at the time.

He was a bit of a challenge, but adjusted o living indoors full time pretty well. If you know what you are getting into and are willing to make the adjustments, then go for it. Especially if you are looking to ADOPT, the rescues know how to fit animals into different homes that meet their needs. I know of many mid contents that do well in full time home settings, just as I know many that do not. You would probably be better off starting with a low content- but you never know, you might get lucky. Just don't be dissapointed if you don't.

My first wolfdog was a great ambassador animal. He came to parks wih me, PetsMart and traveled the county- tagging along to my road trips to New Mexico, Colorado and Kentucky.

A foster of mine who I transported up to Ohio was a blackphase upper mid that does educational/ambassador work, as well as model/photography work.

I have 3 wolfdogs of my own now, 2 of which are rescues. A low content Mal mix that is great in the house, a mid content that does require containment and an upper mid that is good in the house and comes to educational seminars and outings with me- acting as an ambassador wolfdog for Saint Francis Wolf Sacntuary.

My point is- are they for everyone. Absolutely not. Can they be good animals if you take the time to prepare, do your research, be able to provide the necessary needs for the animal and understand what you are getting yourself into? Yes, yes they can. smile




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Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 27, '13 8:02pm PST 
Here is my upper mid doing his meet and greet at Huntsville State Park and at the Texas Wildlife and Woodland Expo that was held on March 23rd.



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Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 28, '13 7:34am PST 
Even if you are unable to make accommodations for a wolfdog, do not despair. There are very wolfy looking dog breeds meant to look that way and be very dog-like in behavior. The Alaskan Noble Companion Dog, Alaskan Klee Kai, Husky, and even a German Shepherd/Husky mix all have wolfy looks and are still dogs. Even some individuals in spitz breeds have that "look" too.

Unless your parents want the pet, too, I would strongly advise against getting anything other than a "small animal" type of pet. I don't want to sound harsh, but if your parents are not willing to possibly make that pet their own, it would be mean to both parent and pet if you move away without it. I'm 20 and I still haven't adopted my dream dog yet: an undemanding senior shelter dog. Why? Young folks like me who are still living at home do not have a definite future. What if you move out and discover there are no rentals in your area that will accept dogs of any kind? What if you live at a dorm? What if you decide it is already time to settle and have a family by the age of 19? How will you manage a young dog and a baby in that situation? I personally know people who have ended up in all these situations and of the ones leaving pets behind, the parents actually LIKED keeping the kid's pet as one of their own.
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Milton

Im just a little- guy
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 29, '13 10:54am PST 
This person said they want to adopt, not buy a wolfdog.

I was looking at malamute rescue and some of the dogs listed were mixes. It would not surprise me if some of the mixes they had were low content wolf dogs. Maybe you could look for wolfy mixed breed dogs. Where I live wolf hybrids are not illegal and there are no laws on them. I know 2 low content wolf dogs.

Both these dogs are approachable and you can pet them. i know the owners of these dogs almost never leave them alone. They are included in their lives all the time. One is a shop mechanic's family pet. He was well socialized and is never left alone. He is a cool dog and always at the shop. The last time I took my truck there, he leaned against me and was very friendly. He is often not even on a leash, but always in sight. he did not look like a normal dog to me and I asked if he was a wolf hybrid.

I think the biggest issue is your age. What are you going to do when you graduate high school? What will happen with your dog? School aged people often are too busy for wolf dogs. They need a lot of attention. if you are working and going to school, you won't have much time for the dog. The only successful adjusted wolf hybrids I know have handlers who spend most of the day with them. I know some sad stories too.
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