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Teaching a scent alert.

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Link

Hero of Hyrule
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 16, '13 2:38pm PST 
Link does very well and is very consistent with his response, and he sometimes alerts, but I'd like to make his alerts more consistent. When I'm about to have a severe panic attack or flashback I always sweat just in my armpits. I've heard of people teaching diabetic alert dogs to alert to blood sugar levels by putting their scent on a cotton ball or tissue from when they are experiencing low or high blood sugar. I'm wondering if anyone has done this with PSDs. I'm also wondering if something like my deodorant would be too overpowering, or how I would get a scent sample without it... besides the obvious, but I can't predict when I'm going to have an attack. Any advice or information is greatly appreciated.
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Isaac

1278829
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 16, '13 11:20pm PST 
You might be thinking of two different things. An alert is when a dog predicts something is going to happen, like when a dog tells you you're going to have a seizure before the seizure starts. Dogs don't alert to low blood sugar, meaning they don't tell you your sugar is going to drop before it does drop. They signal you when your sugar has dropped. A signal is when they tell you something has happened that you might not have noticed yet.

So it seems like you are saying you want your dog to signal you when you have started to sweat more. One problem I foresee is that your dog may not be able to tell if you are sweating because you are starting to have a flashback or if you are sweating because it's hot or because you're exercising or what. Your dog would be signalling you a lot in the summer time!

Are there other things you do when you start to have a flashback that your dog could be trained to pick up on, things you don't do other times? Like, when I start to have an anxiety attack, I often do sweat, but other things I do include clenching my fists and rocking back and forth a bit.
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Link

Hero of Hyrule
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 17, '13 12:31am PST 
I probably used blood sugar as a bad example for an alert, although my little brother has brittle diabetes and I can see if being very useful to get an alert when blood sugar is dropping while not yet in dangerous levels, because when his drops, it goes fast, and with that kind of alert he could eat a piece of candy or drink some juice. A better example would be a seizure alert. Just as a person can have a different scent due to chemical changes in their body before a seizure that dogs can sense, I'd imagine I would smell differently before having a severe panic attack (this would just be for severe, usually out of the blue ones).
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Crazy Sadie- Lady

Im a SD and- proud of it so- there!!!!
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 18, '13 6:21pm PST 
I think Sadie does this work on her own. Someone told me that dogs since a lot of human emotions and a lot of it is cemical fermones that a dog sences through scent.
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Blondie

Love is eternal- hope.
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 20, '13 8:17pm PST 
The dog response is based on combination of factors. Every seizure is different. And he may respond at any one of those. (smell, abnormal sweating, routes in the extremities, change of voice frequency etc.) You need to socialize him well at first, to feel self-confident and willing to work for you in every occasion. Then you need to fix his concentration about yourself. Teach him ignore most of the external influences. To respond well is based on close bound between dog and handler. It seems to be responding of his own, but its the time for him to teach about how to recognize and prevent a potential dangerous situation. Its quite funny, because you try to teach him something, that he can do it only by his own. You can´t help him if you don´t know about what he is actually responding for. The only think you can do it is make to believe in him and ask him every time consistently for clear signals.
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Crazy Sadie- Lady

Im a SD and- proud of it so- there!!!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 21, '13 4:58pm PST 
I guess this too is something I was trying to say in my last post most dogs just do it. I mean Sadie sorta tought me that she was trying to tell me.
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Link

Hero of Hyrule
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 21, '13 8:13pm PST 
He can and does do a great medical response. He knows many signs that I am having problems, like leg shaking, teeth grinding, "spacing off," getting twitchy, rocking, etc. he has always had a strong natural tendency to notice and respond, which I strengthened through training. I am talking about an alert, which is being notified before you experience illness, to try to prevent it (by taking meds, doing cognitive behavioral work), rather than doing damage control.
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Crazy Sadie- Lady

Im a SD and- proud of it so- there!!!!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 22, '13 7:46pm PST 
As I said in the last two post Sadie taught me about her alerts I feel it was on most sent since she is always sniffing me. I figured she was just like a lot of dogs but then I was also testing a lot to and found out that she was telling me that my sugar was up. Cause when she wanted to go out she would go to the door and she did that well and when she wanted food she went to her dish, so if it was about me then she was right by me and she alerted to me. It is mostly suttle and most people don't realize she is doing it or what she is doing. I feel that people don't need to know she was alerting.
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