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Confused adn new to this service dog help

The Service and Therapy Dog forum is for all service and therapy dogs regardless of whether or not their status is legally defined by federal or state law, how they are trained, or whether or not they are "certified." Posts questioning or disputing a person's need for a service or therapy dog, the validity of a person's service or therapy dog, or the dog's ability to do the work of a service or therapy dog are not permitted in this forum. Please keep discussions fun, friendly, and helpful at all times.

  
Drake

What dont kill- you only makes- you strong
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 26, '13 6:48pm PST 
I know service dogs do not have to be registered but would like to know what companies people recommend for vests and tags. Recently recommended to me by my doctor to use my basset mix as a help for my anxiety and fibromyalgia due to the fact she is very laid back and perfectly trained. I'm just so confused trying to figure out all the information. Some places on line say that the tag and vest companies are a scam some say you have to have a trained dog. help Drake is not the dog Id be using gypsy is not on here just yet
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Sarge

Teddybear
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 26, '13 9:28pm PST 
I got my vest from activedogs.com I bought the X-Large S & R style vest due to Sarge's size. The nice part was that they sewed on his patches for me. It came with two patches of your choice but you could also pick out other patches as well and you just let them know where you want each patch sewn. They have many different vests and patches to choose from as well. The sites that say you can register your service dogs are scams. You don't need to register them at all.
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Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 26, '13 11:58pm PST 
Drake it sounds like your doctor might be a little confused as to what a service dog is. But in order to have legal access rights in the US there are a few qualifications. First off your conditions must first meet the definition of disabled as per the ADA, second your dog must be specifically trained to assist you with your disability. A vest shouldn't be one of the first things you look at as a lot of training will need to be done to even determine if your dog is capable of the stress that a service dog goes through. If you have specific questions, feel free to ask here or you could also message me I'd be more than willing to get you resources to help you along.
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Isaac

1278829
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 27, '13 10:00am PST 
Are you disabled by your anxiety and fibromyalgia? If so, what tasks has your dog been trained to do to mitigate your disability?

I got my dog's vest from the program that trained him. It doesn't matter where you get a vest, though. Service dogs are not even required to wear them, though most seem to.

What matters is if you are disabled and that your dog has been trained to do specific tasks to help with your disability.
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Xena

What don't kill- me makes me- stronger
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 27, '13 3:46pm PST 
Anxiety at least in my case is a disability. Gypsy helps with my anxiety by being there to comfort me if I'm having a panic attack and can just keep me calm being there instead of me being alone. As for my fibro she helps me get up when I'm having leg issues due to pain or helps me if I have a dizzy spell. Shes mostly a comfort that makes daily life much easier to deal with. She is not a trained service dog but was a rescue that ended up being so calm and intuitive that she ended up being a huge help for me.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychiatric_service_dog
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Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 27, '13 4:01pm PST 
Gypsy I think you need to read the revisions of the ADA that went into effect in 2010. Because while they clarified that only dogs could be service dogs they also clarified things for owners of psychiatric service dogs. It clearly states that a dog must be specifically trained to do either tasks or work to assist the handler with their disability. Comfort alone doesn't qualify.

From the ADA's new revisions -

"Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA."

You can call the DoJ hotline for any clarifications but when I called the sequence for any service dog that assists with anxiety attacks must be = dog either naturally alerts or is trained to alert based on physical signs then goes forward in a trained behavior to assist you in calming down or removing yourself from the stressful situation." The important thing to remember is that the dog Must be trained to assist, anything that wounds like 'he makes me feel better' is not going to stand up in court.

I wish you the very best of luck and again I'm more than willing to answer any questions you have and help you.
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Isaac

1278829
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 27, '13 6:00pm PST 
Gypsy, just being there to comfort you doesn't make a dog a service dog. To be a service dog, under federal law, as mentioned above, the dog must be trained to do specific tasks that mitigate your disability. It's great that she helps you feel better and comforts you. That just doesn't make her a service dog.
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Sarge

Teddybear
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 27, '13 6:25pm PST 
I agree with Happy on this one. If your using Gypsy as a comfort animal then it sounds more like an ESA and not an SD. Also not sure how a basset hound would help with you getting up and the dizzy spells. I'd uderstand if it was a bigger dog that you could use to pull yourself up with or use as a brace when you get dizzy spells or helps pick up things when you get dizzy but I would think a basset hound would be too small to do those kind of things. I could be wrong since you said she's also a mix. I hope it all works out for you though.
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