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Big Mouth

This is a dedicated place for all of your questions and answers about Raw Diets. There are also some really cool groups like "Raw Fed" on the topic you can join. This forum is for people who already know they like the raw diet or sincerely want to learn more. Please remember that you are receiving advice from peers and not professionals. If you have specific health-related questions about your dog's diet, please contact your vet!

  
Jada

1298250
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 10, '13 8:09pm PST 
I'm very new to the raw feeding community. Not to my dog's dismay, fortunately. But to mine, I fear for her safety! She's a relatively small/medium breed. She has a huge mouth though, and her history I think keeps her thinking she'll never eat again. She scarfs down food as it it's going to be taken. So, since she's so small, her ideal "meal" (twice a day) is only 3 ozs! So my question is on the raw prey diet thing...it says ideal food should be bigger than or as large as the dog's head. I can see how this would help her from scarfing it down whole. However, in doing that I can't make it weight 3 oz. Maybe I'm thinking too hard about this, but how should this be addressed? A 3 oz slab of chicken I don't even think gets chewed. Dinner when it was kibble was virtually ignored, and then begrudgingly eaten in about 6 minutes. Now her poor dinner is about 4 seconds long!

Please help! smile
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Charlie &- Zelda

Love at first- sniff <3
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 10, '13 9:02pm PST 
I always recommend that raw (ESPECIALLY meals that include bone) be fed once a day rather than twice a day. If I fed my dogs raw meaty bones that weighed half of their daily intake, it would be a real choking hazard.

I have two "gulpers" (dogs that eat very fast), and I always have to be cautious feeding raw. Any meal they get needs to either be so large that it forces them to chew-- or cut into small pieces to prevent choking, and boneless meals are not exempt from this.

The scariest moment of my life was giving Charlie a 1-pound hunk of solid pork and watching him try to swallow it whole.. the next 30 seconds after he spiraled around the room gagging and then by some miracle he managed to hack it up. Since then, I have taken no chances with him. If your gut tells you that it's dangerous, don't feel bad about feeding by hand.

Edited by author Mon Jun 10, '13 9:02pm PST

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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 10, '13 11:01pm PST 
Believe me we know and it is hard to deal with at first.

A few ideas and check Chance's site for ideas as well.
http://www.chanceslittlewebsite.com/uploads/7/6/9/2/7692088/beginn ers_guide_to_prey_model_raw_rv.6.pdf

I will cut that measly bit of meat into a W or Z shape so it is long and a bit more awkward to eat than a straight strip or chunk. Chicken ribs are flat and light weight and works great for Max. Force a chicken bone knob into a kong, Max won't try to pull it out for some reason but gnaws down to the knob. Some freeze meals to a plate so it has to be at least partly gnawed down. Some try offering a huge piece to the dog and trading for it after approximately the right amount has been eaten. Feeding once a day would help a little bit too.

Max stopped being so eager after he had been on raw for a while and was eating big/small. I know the usual 10 ounces keeps his body in good weight but it doesn't fill him all the way up. Big/small was working to gorge feeding where he stepped away from a really big and hard to eat meal like a whole animal, shoulder roast, rack of beef ribs. Whole chicken was a fail - far too easy to eat and far too bony. Unfortunately it is probably best to wait to do that until your dog has been on raw for a while and is used to all the usual proteins and organs.
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Jada

1298250
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 7:42am PST 
My concern with the frozen meats is that my " new to raw" girls won't eat them that way. Mollie is our Dachshund, and chews much better than her larger sister. I gave them chicken drumsticks, and was petrified that Jada would swallow it whole. It was cold. but she ate it. Jada probably wouldn't mind too much if it was partially frozen, but Mollie wouldn't eat the drumstick until it was " warm". Lol. Either way, I really appreciate the feedback.
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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 10:12am PST 
Max won't eat frozen either. I put a fresh from the freezer meaty bone on a towel this week and he went to his bed and waited for an hour or so before getting up and starting in on it. It was only half his meal so he wasn't starving but we were chuckling about that one.

Forgot one. Clamp a vise grip to the bit. Since I had Sassy rub a groove in her canine going after a mouse in a metal pipe not sure that is wise for some dogs though.

Chance mentions holding the food in the raw feeding primer. Good luck on that, raw is slippery stuff and eager dogs can miss the mark and get you. It can make the dog more anxious to get the food down the throat too. I hope you are feeding the dogs far from one another, if they are worried the others are going to steal the food they are far more likely to gulp it down.
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Jada

1298250
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 6:06pm PST 
I do feed my two apart. They actually are in different rooms, but I suppose the truth be known, they can see one another. So maybe there is a fear factor there. As a rule, Mollie eats slower than Jada, so I would think it would be Mollie who would gulp. Jada has been that way since the day we got her though, so i suspect it was a learned trait from long ago.

I like the partially frozen idea though for Jada. I do think that would help slow it down. She is so frantic to eat any and everything, that she'd probably attack a 10# slab of frozen meat bits, just to ensure she could get something in her.
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Cookie

the chi-weenie
 
 
Barked: Wed Jun 26, '13 4:21pm PST 
my dog eats 3 oz per DAY. she also has a decent sized mouth. she's not an itty bitty nosed flat face dog. although she is only 8.5 lbs, she's got a long snout. I tried feeding 2 meals a day when i first started. but I had to end that. the meals were just too small, they didn't satisfy her and it was too much work. she eats 1 meal a day now.

when you feed bone, get a bone that is too big for her to swallow, but small enough for her to gnaw. let her tear the meat off and then gnaw on the bone.
hopefully she will learn to crunch up bones, I think she will. as long as the bone pieces are small enough to swallow, then she can swallow them. I think it will be okay.
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