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Toy breed bone suggestions

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Member Since
04/25/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 25, '13 5:15pm PST 
Any suggestions on types of bones for toy breeds? I have been doing a lot of chicken necks but I'm afraid of my dogs choking on them. Also they will only eat the necks if I hand fed them, which is not always convenient. Any thoughts on how to encourage them to eat on their own? Much appreciated!

Edited by author Thu Apr 25, '13 7:07pm PST

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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 26, '13 10:03am PST 
How about confining them and leaving them alone to eat? Or try playing with the neck until they are grabbing it and tugging a little? Or put it away for an hour and try again when they might be more hungry? Or smashing it up well and cutting into bits just for right now?

Eating raw is more work, they may need to gain some experience and strength before they are comfortable taking 1/2 an hour to eat.

Little dogs can have fun with any bone big dogs eat, they just won't eat much of it. Even 38 pound Max leaves nearly all the pork and beef bone [never the long beef leg bones though] offered. He can eat rabbit, fish, turkey, chicken completely and half of lamb bones usually. Try Cornish Game hen, a joint or two a day is a good way to start raw, half CGH and half red meat/organ is an intermediate diet then might eat 2-3 CGH joints a week when closer to 10% bone.
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Sandy

tiny...but fast!
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 26, '13 5:27pm PST 
I have a toy breed and I feed premade raw Stella and chewys patties. The bones r ground up so u can't even see them.
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Meridian

Proud to be a- kitchen wolf!!!
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 26, '13 10:32pm PST 
Will they not eat bone if left to their own devices? Your post is a wee big vague. Letting them just have at the food with no hovering or interruptions will be a positive step towards your goals. To help with choking risk, feed a big chunk of something and let them gnaw what they need off. Don't, say, feed just the neck if it's too small.

Good small items with edible bone include "cornish game hens" (which are just small chickens), quail, rabbit, and whole prey usually intended for reptiles. You can also halve medium sized chickens. If chicken necks are too small, try turkey neck portions. That might prove a good RMB for a very small dog where they can chew off enough edible bone to fill their bone requirement. Lamb bones are also good for small dogs. Even the smallest bones will be good sized raw-meaty-bones for them, but they'll probably be able to at least eat some rib bone, and the cartilaginous parts of lamb leg bones could prove very good.
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Member Since
04/25/2013
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 27, '13 9:16pm PST 
Thanks for the suggestions smile I started giving meaty drumsticks so they can hold on to one end while chewing the other. This seems to be working, but I'm worried how the middle of the bone become sharp, so Ive been taking it away when they have the ends gnawed off. I wish I was more confident in feeding the bones, I tend to freak out easily, guess it will just takes some time... Thanks again!
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Bullie

1284557
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 28, '13 10:19pm PST 
Believe it or not dogs - even the toy breeds - are very efficient at eating sharp raw bones.

My dog is small not toy but he used to only eat his food if I hold on to it. I did 2 things - I replaced his bowl with a very shallow one - almost like a plate and then I left him to his own devices. It takes him a while bit he can down turkey drumsticks on gorge day.
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Hula

This is MY- stuffie!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 29, '13 7:37am PST 
Throw down the whole chicken, cornish hen, or quail. Let him eat until you feel he's had enough, then put it in the fridge for next time. There us a much less chance of choking if you feed big to the wee ones.
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