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Min pins old/bad teeth new to raw, need help!!!

This is a dedicated place for all of your questions and answers about Raw Diets. There are also some really cool groups like "Raw Fed" on the topic you can join. This forum is for people who already know they like the raw diet or sincerely want to learn more. Please remember that you are receiving advice from peers and not professionals. If you have specific health-related questions about your dog's diet, please contact your vet!

  


Member Since
04/08/2013
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 8, '13 10:12am PST 
Hello I've recently discovered raw feeding and it's benefits so I'm new to this.
We've got 2 min pins Lefty(12 lbs M) and Josie(5 lbs F) and I'm convinced they
should start raw feeding. They've always been kibble fed and 2 years ago my
mother started feeding them this softened through water. I knew this was bad
and now there teeth are an issue. Lefty will still eat hard food but Josie will swallow them whole.

Lefty issues are far less severe, since a pup he's always carried around a
squeaky toy which has helped clean his teeth. He's never had any pulled, they just
look bad. Josie on the other hand has only one front K-9 left which is loose
and NO other front teeth. Many rear teeth have been pulled. Josie doesn't care
for us to examine here teeth(never has never will) so it's hard to tell exactly how many rear teeth
she has, I'd say 8-12.

We're planning to bring them to the vet again for a cleaning and see if any more teeth
need be pulled(this has gotten expensive). I'm concerned with the anesthesia also and would prefer not to do
this, but I'm willing to do whatever the dogs needs.

So here are a few question I'd appreciate some help on.

Should I get them cleaned and any teeth pulled that may be loose before I go
raw?

Are elderly dogs able to make the transition to raw with missing or bad teeth?

Are there certain raw items I should feed them under these circumstances?

What size portions with bones are safe for Lefty (12 lbs) or Josie (5 lbs)?
Chicken legs, chicken wings, chicken neck, etc?

Are there certain meats with bone that I should feed them due to age and teeth?
Example... should I stick with raw chicken for there bone intake?

Last one, is there another way to supplement the bone in there diet? Cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt?

Thank you much to anyone that can offer me some advice! Any other information
would also appreciated! Thanks again!

Edited by author Mon Apr 8, '13 10:14am PST

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Maxwell

I'm triple- superior MAD- now!
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 8, '13 1:58pm PST 
Hi Lefty and Josie, hope we can help you out here. How old are you two? I might suggest having blood tests done in case there is systemic disease brewing as raw feeding might be quite different if there is a problem. There is usually a period of adjustment and you sure wouldn't want to think it was adjusting when it was really a serious problem.

Should I get them cleaned and any teeth pulled that may be loose before I go
raw?

Absolutely, they may not even try to eat raw if their mouths hurt. Chewing will strengthen the teeth and keep the teeth and gums cleaner but first they have to be comfortable eating! Caroline is an elderly raw fed dog with dental issues, hope she sees this thread to give you some pointers.

Are elderly dogs able to make the transition to raw with missing or bad teeth?

I have read that completely toothless dogs can actually smash and swallow bony meat on their own. Not seen it myself however. There is always grinding!

Are there certain raw items I should feed them under these circumstances?

They are small dogs with dental issues, easy bone for sure. Grinding might be easier at first then offering long strips to tear at and nom on. Chunks are hazardous for Max but then he has all his chompers. Max doesn't take bites, chew and swallow. He puts a lot of tooth marks in the meat and swallows it pretty much whole. Any breaking apart of the strip is purely accidental.

What size portions with bones are safe for Lefty (12 lbs) or Josie (5 lbs)?
Chicken legs, chicken wings, chicken neck, etc?

Smashed chicken necks and ribs at first. I really like ribs as they are the size of my hand and impossible to get completely into the mouth like necks. I wouldn't expect them to be able to eat legs and wings at first if ever but after they get the idea working those larger bones would be great exercise and good for the mouth even if they don't actually break and eat the bones.

Are there certain meats with bone that I should feed them due to age and teeth?
Example... should I stick with raw chicken for there bone intake?

38 pound Max gets most of his bone from chicken it is just fine. If you happen upon a good deal of pork or beef ribs or turkey then offer it up but don't expect most of the bone to be eaten. I throw away nearly half the weight of a beef rib dinner. Expensive but he enjoys them so much.

Last one, is there another way to supplement the bone in there diet? Cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt?

Dairy balances itself but doesn't have enough calcium to use with meat. If I had to use a calcium supplement for Max I would choose bone meal as other wise he wouldn't be getting enough phosphorus but if a dog is getting 2.5-5% his/her ideal body weight per day then the usually suggested powdered egg shell works really well. A tiny 1/2 tsp per pound of meat is all that is needed.

Oh, lots of information here! Please read through Chance's excellent primer on raw feeding if you haven't already.
http://www.chanceslittlewebsite.com/uploads/7/6/9/2/769208 8/beginners_guide_to_prey_model_raw_rv.6.pdf
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Lefty

1291177
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 8, '13 4:06pm PST 
Can't believe I forgot there age Lefty is 11 1/2 Josie is 10 1/2. Thank you for the reply, very helpful information thanks Maxwell!!

My hopes was to find someone with a similar situation. Caroline if you got any advice it would be greatly appreciated. I can't tell you how many times and different ways I've google searched old dogs/bad teeth/raw diet cry. I've read through many threads and post trying to get this figured out. Want to be thorough is all my dog means the world to me(Lefty is mine Josie is my mothers).

Another hurdle I must jump over is convincing my family I"m not crazy wanting to switch to raw, I've had to chip away but I"m getting through to them I think. smile Thanks again for help guys!!!
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Sandy

tiny...but fast!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 9, '13 9:43am PST 
I feed my Italian greyhound Stella and chewys premade raw. They are frozen patties no chewing required. Sandy could eat it with no teeth especially if u put some warm water in it and stir it up. Also your family may be more likely to agree with it because it looks like little hamburger patties.
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Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 9, '13 11:09am PST 
I switched my older dog with some minor dental issues to raw about 2 years ago. She is turning 14 in a couple weeks and has only lost 1 tooth since the switch and no longer needs yearly dentals. She really looks fantastic for her age and still has most of her teeth.

I agree with Maxwell, definitely get their teeth checked out and make sure they are healthy before changing their diet.

For my dogs I give chicken and turkey pretty much exclusively for bone-in meals, even for my younger, slightly larger dog who is a heavy duty chewer. They still get the dental benefits, but I don’t worry about chipped teeth. For dogs your size Cornish game hens would be great. I’ve also found farm raised quail on occasion that my dogs really liked.

One thing I noticed with my older dog is that after eating kibble all her life, and never being interested in chew toys, she didn’t really know how to chew. She figured out how to munch through bones pretty quickly, and it was actually the boneless meat that caused her more problems, she would try to swallow it whole and choke. Feeding partially frozen meat helped with that, and now she’s a good chewer.
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