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Raw Diet...is this a good idea???

This is a dedicated place for all of your questions and answers about Raw Diets. There are also some really cool groups like "Raw Fed" on the topic you can join. This forum is for people who already know they like the raw diet or sincerely want to learn more. Please remember that you are receiving advice from peers and not professionals. If you have specific health-related questions about your dog's diet, please contact your vet!

  
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Member Since
02/16/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 10:11am PST 
So I've been looking at an easy yet nutritious raw meal for my English Bulldog and I think I've found one.

10 lbs. of ground Chicken and Bone (Neck, thighs, breast, drums, whatever you can get cheapest)
3 lbs. of Carrots
1.5 lbs. of Wheat bran
1 c. of Extra virgin olive oil
For puppies just add unflavored Jell-O cooked oatmeal or rice.

Couple of questions on this one though for you experienced feeders.
1. My dog is grain-free and gluten-free due to a yeast allergy. What can I substitute with the wheat bran to get the nutrients? (I'm also open to any other tweaks you might have to the recipe...this just looks like a good starting point for my adventure!)
2. I have found a place locally where I can get 40 lbs of chicken necks for $27.00 and 5 lbs of chicken liver for $10. I was thinking of doing a split somehow between those two so she is getting everything. Good idea or not? I'm planning on making up a couple weeks to a months worth of food at a time. I'm looking at meat grinders now.
3. Is there anything that is blatantly missing from this that I need to add? I'm going to give probiotics, salmon oil, coconut oil, and possibly some fruits periodically through the meals. I'm trying to not make "rookie mistakes" and give my baby the best meal possible.
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Member Since
02/05/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 10:22am PST 
Dogs don't need grain. Alot of raw feeders don't feed vegetables either. I feed Stella and chewys premade raw.
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Member Since
02/16/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 10:28am PST 
I looked at a bunch of the premade stuff and it was just too expensive for what I'd have to feed her. With this plan I will be spending roughly around $50/month on meat which I'm ok with. I was wrong about the wholesaler. Its not local so I have to pay shipping which is why my total is at $50 instead of the $35 range. I'm going to keep looking for stuff locally to cut down price.

My main thing was I didn't know if I needed to add/take away anything from my "tentative" diet plan to make it a healthy raw diet.
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 10:34am PST 
Well I don't know a whole lot about raw diets other than prey model raw, but that diet looks to be lacking in red meat and organs other than liver. Red meat is much more nutrient rich than poultry, and liver is only half of the necessary organs. The carrots, bran, Jell-O, and rice all just seem unnecessary to me, but again, I don't know much about raw diets that use grains, vegetables, or fruits. Since dogs aren't really designed to digest plants, any veggies would need to be blended or cooked to break them down. If you're going to feed a diet that contains plant material, it's a good idea to keep it below 25% of the overall diet, with the rest being meat, with as much of the meat being red as possible.

Have you looked into prey model at all? 80% meat, 10% bone, 5% liver, 5% other secreting organ. I personally find it much easier and less confusing than other raw diets. No bran to worry about, no blending, no cooking, ect. As long as you can feed a few different proteins (beef, pork, chicken, ect.), prey model raw can be as easy as taking meals out of the freezer a few hours before feeding. Usually the most difficult part is finding secreting organs other than liver (kidney, spleen, thymus, ect.).

For most people, PMR is much cheaper than pre-mades. It's generally the most expensive when first starting out. As you go, you'll probably find more cost efficient ways to source meat. I don't imagine it would be too hard to feed a Bulldog on $50 a month.

By far the best guide I've seen on PMR is Chance's Beginner's Guide to Prey Model Raw. I would definitely recommend giving it a read through if you have any interest in PMR. It will seem like a lot to learn at first, but once you have the basic ideas down, it really is quite easy.

Edited by author Sun Feb 17, '13 10:49am PST

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Member Since
02/16/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 10:48am PST 
Onyx, Thanks for your response. I've looked at PMR, but I have concerns with her eating the bigger portions of meat, whole bones, and would feel more comfortable and "in control" if I ground up the meat and bone. I'm new to this whole raw food deal so if you know a way that I could do the PMR and do something like the ground meat/bone part then I'd be all ears. I'd like to get my meat costs to around $25-30. Another problem with the PMR is that I only have about 1/4 of a freezer to store any food. Thanks for your help.
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 10:57am PST 
You can definitely feed raw using ground meat and bones. Whole foods do offer a lot more in the way of teeth cleaning and mental stimulation though. It's normal to be wary of feeding bones, especially because you hear so often that chicken bones are dangerous for dogs, but raw bones are actually quite safe. Of course there's always a small choking risk, but that's true for any food, including kibble and ground meat. Large pieces are actually the safest way to feed, because they force the dog to chew their food, rather than trying to swallow it whole.

That said, you should do what you feel comfortable with. It might be the most cost effective in the long run to buy your own grinder if you want to feed everything ground.
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Cookie

the chi-weenie
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 11:03am PST 
Prey model raw is the simplest it gets. in my opinion

mostly meat, 10% bone, 10% organ (at least half being liver)

It sounds like you've got a good bulk deal with the chicken necks and liver! You can also find beef liver and kidney at the store.

You want to feed red meat when you can because it's more nutritious. Pork is the cheapest available. Always take advantage of good deals on beef, and if you have friends who hunt, you can get deer scraps. You can find old freezer meats on craigslist and freecyle too for free!

Every now and then you can find beef cuts for $2.00 and under. so take advantage of that.
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Member Since
02/16/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 11:17am PST 
I figured I would eventually work in kind of a combination of the ground chicken necks/liver with some type of beef. I'm pretty happy with the meat part of the diet but know it needs more nutritional parts. I really don't know if there is anything that I could do to replace the wheat bran. Eggs?
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Member Since
02/05/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 12:53pm PST 
There is this stuff called sojos its a dehydrated raw mix and they make a veggie one with eggs u could add a little of that. I don't think its that expensive especially if u just use a little.
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Meridian

Proud to be a- kitchen wolf!!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 4:24pm PST 
This is most definitely not a good idea, and the suggestion of adding more grains for puppies is even worse! Even if you plan to feed the chicken part raw this is probably best discussed in the homecooking forum, as they'll be more equipped to recommend how to create balanced meals around a protein base using grains, veggies, supplements and other items.

If you're already going to be feeding raw chicken, why not just make sure the organ content is there and call it a meal? This will probably surprise a lot of people to hear me say the following given the content of most of my posts and opinions, but I'll take the opportunity to say I think there are many dogs who can get by just fine on a mostly-chicken raw diet, and IMO a simple diet of chicken meat/bones/organs is better for the long term than processed food diets, and even many "complete" home cooked diets. Ideal? Most certainly not, but if you're looking to take shortcuts it's not the worst thing you could do.
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