GO!

I'm Really Done... Puppy Biting!

Got a new, young, furry love in your life? This is the place for you to ask all of your questions-big or small! Just remember that you are receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a vet or behaviorist! Most important is to remember to have fun with your new fur baby.

  
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Piper

Perfect Timing- Pup
 
 
Barked: Wed Jun 26, '13 11:19pm PST 
My puppy is a golden retriever, and I thought they were supposed to be soft-mouths! I know she's a puppy, but she WON'T stop biting. And it's not teething, it's I'm-going-to-bite-off-your-face biting.

If you tell her no, she bites more. If you have to physically move her away, she bites more. If you yell at her, she bites more. If you tell her no firmly, she bites you more. If you get up and walk away, come back, she'll bite you more.

She just doesn't stop. Today she bit me hard in the arm and I started crying, could just be because I've been emotional lately but nonetheless. My mother had to step in and tell her no, but she kept going for me. Kept lunging to bite me. If she were a dog, that would be a really scary situation. Then she started barking at me in frustration cause she couldn't get to me to bite me. She even turned on my mother a couple times and she's pretty forgiving when it comes to my mother.

She's a smart dog; we've only had her for a week and a half and we've already taught her Sit, Stay, Come, Down, Leave It, Up, and I think that's it.
But the biting is a major problem and I don't know how to handle it. I've even tried the shake can method, but she barks and bites at that and just gets mad at it.

I'm lost, and I don't know what to do. I'm hoping I can get something from you guys, but I honestly think there is nothing else but stay away from her and wait it out or something. I don't know. I'm lost. Please help.
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 27, '13 12:51am PST 
Have you tried a time-out until she calms down? Sounds like the things you're trying are just getting her more excited. Put her in a safe room/area (bathroom, x-pen, ect.) for 5 minutes when she gets too riled up.
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Quincy

We don't doodle!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 27, '13 4:30am PST 
Where did you get this puppy??? Is she from show or field lines? It sounds like perhaps she has lots of field breeding behind her and that can be keeping her wound up. Field retrievers (labs OR Goldens) are bred to be go, go, go, and unless there is almost constant exercise and mind stimulation, they are extremely difficult puppies.
I would first contact your breeder for suggestions, up her exercise with interactive things like retrieving, mind games, etc., and remove her for a time out when she winds to high.
Good luck!
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Firefly

Life is better- with Sheltie- love.
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 27, '13 5:56am PST 
I agree with Quincy about the exercise! way to go Sounds like she's an active, high energy golden who is getting a bit rambunctious. Retrieving and long walks, along with interactive, stimulating toys should wear her out.

This will keep her from mouthing you with determination. A lot of puppies bite because that's how puppies play: with their mouths. If you find she's still mouthing you even after high exercise, then a licking/mouthing deterrent like a Bitter Apple Spray applied to your hands can do the trick (or any of her favorite places to bite you). She'll find you aren't very pleasant to have her in her mouth.

You can also give her a firm "No" or behavior interrupting noise, and redirect her to something appropriate... Like a toy. Then proceed to play with the toy, and she'll learn if she wants to play, she doesn't need to bite you, but she can find an appropriate toy. If she ignores the toy and insists on biting you still, stop all play, walk away. Another technique that will teach her the fun stops when biting starts.

Good luck Piper's mommy!
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Missy

Miss- Pig!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 27, '13 7:15am PST 
I agree with trying time-outs. I just gave the same advice to the Guest poster asking the same questions as you. Time-outs were the only thing that worked for Missy when she was a puppy. I'd stop all interactions with her, leave the room and shut her in behind me for about 5 minutes. That was usually enough to calm her down some and when I re-entered she was more interested in where I had been and what I had been doing than to continue the OTT playing. You can also try refocusing that energy into mini training sessions asking for sit/downs etc.
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Arya

Serious Face
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 27, '13 1:27pm PST 
When Arya is incessant like that I have to take her out and run her around while playing tug and fetch in order to burn off that energy. If I run without a toy, she will just try to bite my legs because she's so hyped up.

Time-outs are totally fair when you just can't take it anymore and need to breath.

If you just say No, pups don't really understand unless you direct them to something they're allowed to bite on after saying it or stop all play and ignore them. Sometimes even if you say it in a mean voice or yell, the puppy is so excited that just the interaction with you is rewarding enough. You're moving a lot and making noise, which seems like playing as far as they're concerned.

Hang in there! You're not alone, Arya has had me so frustrated and exhausted and in tears with her behavior that I've told my boyfriend I regret getting a puppy. x_x Puppy energy is insane, especially when you first get them and they're getting used to a new environment and learning all of our human rules and routines. As they settle in, things will get better!
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Piper

Perfect Timing- Pup
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 27, '13 1:29pm PST 
Thanks for the tips!

She's been confined to the living room because she would go upstairs to use the bathroom instead of telling us, so we took away her potty place and she was doing well but... well, the point is, she's already confined to the living room, but I can step out of the confined space and go somewhere else for a time out.

We got her from a first-time breeder, but she was doing good. Her friend was a vet and the vet gave her tips on how to care for the puppies etc. She was a farm dog though, so that might explain why she is so riled up all the time?

Piper doesn't seem to like to retrieve. She's not interested in tennis balls, only in playing things like tug o war, which we've stopped. Or chasing. Which we've also stopped. I think I bought a broken golden laugh out loud
She can't go for walks yet though, not until the 3rd because she hasn't had her shots yet.

We've got the bitter apple spray, but she just goes crazy for it. It's really odd. She LIKES it.

I'll try giving her the time outs, that seems to be the most common. Plus it's probably the only way I can get her to stop. I'll try it today and let you know how it goes.
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Jewel, PCD

8.6lbs of fury- in a bow!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 27, '13 2:06pm PST 
Will you be taking her to a puppy class? Perhaps having another puppy tell her that she's biting too much will get the message through. Sometimes I feel like I tell my puppy the same thing over and over then Jewel tells her and it's done. laugh out loud
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Arya

Serious Face
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 27, '13 2:17pm PST 
There's another spray made by Nature's Miracle you could try. It's called No-Chew, we just bought it though so I can't tell you how well it works yet. XD Has a bunch of different plant extracts in it.

Sometimes you have to train dogs to feel rewarded while playing fetch. At first they may be uninterested, because they don't see anything in it for them. I'm slowly trying to with Arya (gets bored super easy), but I do use playing tug as one of the rewards for bringing something back... as well as treats for giving up the object and letting me throw it again.
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Quincy

We don't doodle!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 27, '13 3:15pm PST 
Farm dog or not, most of what you get is determined by genetics and without knowing if she is field bred OR show bred you have no idea what is behind her.
I also hope these people DID hip and elbow xrays on the father and mother as well as eye checks and heart checks before breeding them. Those are major problems with goldens and need to be ruled out by testing prior to any breeding as unless that is done, you can easily be doubling up on one of those major health issues.
Sadly, sometimes paying less equals paying MUCH more in the long run, especially with a breed like a golden or a Labrador. Temperament and health are major issues in these breeds and need to be carefully evaluated prior to doing ANY breeding, whether it be pet or show.
At least if you can find out if she is from field OR show lines you can better prepare yourself to deal with the extra energy of field lines and train more while she is still young.
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