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Questions about Dr. Pitcairn...

This is the place to share your best homemade dog food and treat recipes with each other! Remember to use caution if your pet has allergies and to make any diet changes gradually so that your dog's stomach can adjust to the new foods you are introducing.

  
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Timber CGC

Compulsive- face-licking- disorder ;)
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 29, '09 11:24am PST 
So after reading so many recommendations on Dr. Pitcairn's book, I went to the bookstore to have a look at it. It really confused me. Here is why: He advertised grains and even cornmeal. I thought those were big no-no's for dogs as they can cause allergies and are indigestible (corn). Can someone help me clear this up?
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♥M ♥

Missy MooMoo
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 29, '09 11:34am PST 
Moreover, Dr.Pitcairn also has recipes with pasta, oats or other grains a few people here say are a no-no too shrug I still love the book and if you agree with some of the ingredients or not it's a helpful resource for other things. I tried his eggshell powder recipe and it was great. I guess if you do try those recipes with certain grains just be sure your dog is not allergic. I was told by my vet to switch to one of his recipes and I will try it out on Magpie but I've noticed she reacts within hours to an introduced allergen so if her reaction is bad I just won't continue.

ETA to say if your dog has allergies it's best to start an elimination diet first and get them cleared up that way it won't be too much of a guessing game and you will have clear evidence of their allergy triggers if you try out one of the recipes.

Edited by author Thu Jan 29, '09 11:37am PST

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Sassy

Princess and the- Pea
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 29, '09 5:06pm PST 
Dr. Pitcairn was a pioneer in pet nutrition. He told people they COULD feed their pets on their own. Good stuff. The books are pretty old now and we have moved on. I am sure the recipes are fine but now we can do even better. Most dogs can use grains but protein is even better.
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Timber CGC

Compulsive- face-licking- disorder ;)
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 30, '09 8:29am PST 
Well, I looked into the new guide, that was published in 2005. I know there is an older one. The new one still advertises grains, so I was confused. Is there a book out that is like it, just without the grains and corn? To my knowledge Timber doesn't have allergies, but I don't want to feed him grains if there is no point. After all, I can't even digest corn (ever wonder why it comes out whole even though you chewed it up? I still don't know how corn does thatthinking) so yeah...
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Maya

Excited to have- a twolegger- sibling!!!
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 30, '09 11:49am PST 
Thats the only problem that I have always had with Dr.Pitcairns books. I don't like that he adds grains into most of the recipes he has, but his healthy powder is a nice recipe to keep on hand.
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Newman

If my snoring- bothers you wear- earplugs
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 31, '09 11:16am PST 
I just ordered the book today. I would say, as with any diet, make sure that it is right for your dog. There are recipes where I substitute or just don't add some of the ingredients. I don't think grains are a necessity and I know my dog is allergic so that is something I would leave out.
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Thea

Can I have your- SOUP???
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 4, '09 5:50am PST 
In the Pitcairn book, I usually will substitute the grains with sweet potatoes. Thea cannot tolerate grains...but does seem to do okay with the "Quick Canine Oats and Eggs" in the Pitcairn book, for some reason. I guess oats are one she can eat w/o problems.
Juliette de Bairacli Levy wrote a great book on natural rearing, and also fed grains, as does Wendy Vollhard. Wendy Vollhard's book is worth the $ just for her section on interpreting lab results.
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Timber CGC

Compulsive- face-licking- disorder ;)
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 4, '09 8:11am PST 
Yes, I figured it to be odd. Thea, that is a good idea to substitute the grains with sweet potatoes. Do you use the same amount as grains in the recipe?
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Thea

Can I have your- SOUP???
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 5, '09 6:03am PST 
I tend to go a bit less on any complex carb/starch. It is just a personal preference thing for me, and I really have no idea how the nutrient profile for sweet potatoes stacks up against more "traditional" grains...I imagine that sweet potatoes have much more vitamin A,C and potassium than grains, and less of the B complex vitamins. I often play around a bit with the "grainy" ingredients, and will add some ground flax seed, crushed walnuts, almonds, etc. And when I make fruit/veggie juice in my juicer, I will use the leftover pulp in any recipe I am doing up. I am sure to remove the pulp BEFORE I add any grapes, or oranges--seeds and pith make the pulp unappealing to my dogs, and I can't imagine it would be very good for them.

All of my dogs go nuts for sweet potatoes much more than, say, oats. To them, the s. potatoes are like a special treat...
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Sassy

Princess and the- Pea
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 5, '09 7:21am PST 
There is a tool on nutritiondata to compare different foods. I use grain as a source of calories, sweet potato for Vitamin A but meat is for most everything else. I wonder about too much beta carotene being a problem. Nope, just looked at onibasu it isn't a problem. I have discovered that sweet potato is a high oxalate food so my old dogs with potential kidney problems are getting pumpkin instead. Sure cannot substitute pumpkin for grain. 10 ounces of pumpkin has the calories of 1 ounce of dry rice or pasta. Sweet potato is better, 4 ounces of that to 1 ounce of the rice/pasta.
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