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Getting my coat evened out after clipping at vets office.

Good grooming practices are essential for maintaining health and happiness for you and your dog. This is a forum to exchange tips and advice for proper care of your dog's hygiene needs.

  
Fritz

Fritz, cats are- fun when they- run
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 7:42am PST 
Hi,
I know most people advocate against clipping double coated dogs, like me, and I don't normally get clipped but I got hurt and the vet took a lot of my coat down to the skin.
Once I am healed, my person was wondering if she should get the rest of my coat clipped so I will be more even and I can grow my coat back evenly.

Thoughts? Please no rants about the evil practice of clipping huskies. I got clipped to treat bad wounds. Better a messed up coat then a dead dog.
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 11:53am PST 
Fritz, IMO, it's six of one, half a dozen of the other. I usually advocate leaving it alone with coats like huskies. Problem is, it takes so long for the new coat to grow in that you get mighty sick of looking at all the patches, BOL!
I do find it better to look at some holes than to damage more coat and have to watch MORE damaged areas grow back.
On dogs with coats that are normally groomed it is easy to even out the areas and the coat will pretty much look the same all over within a few weeks, BUT, with your husky coat, the undercoat is going to grow in first before the guard hairs so it will be a long time growing, no matter how you look at it, and will definitely look different.
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Fritz

Fritz, cats are- fun when they- run
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 1:34pm PST 
Yeah, I was clipped once due to matting when I came to live here. It took about two years for my coat to come back right.

I have three huge areas clipped, shoulder, back and neck. I wonder if I could get the rest of my coat thinned out so it would blend a little better.
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 3:59pm PST 
I would probably trim the edges down gradually so they merged better, sort of angle them over an inch or two width along the edges of the shaved areas. I am not sure how you would thin the entire coat??
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Turner

Canadian- Champion, CGN
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 7:05pm PST 
Me personally, I wouldn't clip the entire dog. I would just leave it, and maybe blend the edges of the clipped areas so it doesn't look so obvious, like Toto has said. I don't like clipping double coated dogs, so I avoid it at all costs, so I think it's better to deal with a few holes than the entire coat being gone.

Currently my dog has a patch of hair clipped from being at the vet as well. It's on his front leg though, and the hair on his collar covers it, so it's not as obvious if you're looking down at him, but it's pretty obvious when you see it. Still, I'd rather look at that then have his entire leg shaved. laugh out loud
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Fritz

Fritz, cats are- fun when they- run
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 14, '13 7:26am PST 
When Fritz is better I will ask our groomer to see if she can blend the edges.

He really does have some gaping holes in his coat, poor guy has a nasty shoulder wound, scrapes on his neck and back, and a really bad leg wound. Our vet shaved large areas, partly to help keep the wounds clean and partly to find anymore scrapes hidden under the coat. (as I said, better a messed up coat,then a dead dog)

Poor Fritz, I can't groom him very thoroughly right now, he is still pretty sore,(or maybe he is playing on my sympathy, he hates to be groomed) but he has been able to reduce his pain meds and his wounds are clean and healing.

Thank you for your ideas. I don't want to mess his coat up more then it already is, but he is quite the site at the moment.
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Chance

How You Doin'?
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 14, '13 8:59pm PST 
Chance is double coated and has had big patches shaved off both sides and her butt in the past.
Butt was from the "rescue" letting a large dog use her as a chew toy when she was a wee pup, right side was a dog bite, left side was a tiny little lump removal and an over-ambitious vet tech with clippers.

We just let it grow back naturally. Seemed to take forever to grow out. Can't tell where she was shaved though now!
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Ace

Mischief is my- middle name
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 19, '13 9:28am PST 
Obviously better to have a messed up coat than a hurt dog! I'd leave as is. Fritz is obviously a "forever dog" so no worries about what he looks like temporarily.
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Member Since
01/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 20, '13 6:29pm PST 
What can you do to improve the health of your dog, its coat, and its skin that is cheap and effective? Grooming that's what! The small investment of time and money involved for grooming can yield numerous benefits for your dog's health!
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Fritz

Fritz, cats are- fun when they- run
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 20, '13 9:33pm PST 
??? My coat is healthy, it is a mess because I was hurt and the vet shaved a lot of it to treat the wounds. Grooming is good for dogs, but that isn't an issue as far as I am concerned. My coat is thick and healthy, at least what is left is thick an healthy. I think I will probably just leave it alone. I will just get my foot weeds and private parts trimmed and leave the rest to grow back in a couple of years. BOL You're right ace, I am a forever dog and it doesn't really matter if my coat is ugly as long as I am healthy and happy.
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