GO!

unwelcome breeds??

Good grooming practices are essential for maintaining health and happiness for you and your dog. This is a forum to exchange tips and advice for proper care of your dog's hygiene needs.

  
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Gatsby

if it smells- good, eat it
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 27, '11 8:48am PST 
I just opened my own shop a few days ago and have discovered that my area has a ton of "wolf hybrids" I quote that because I dont know if they are actually hybrids or not. Anyway I was wondering if there is any info you guys can share about breeds you dont groom and why and if anyone could share a good wolf hybrid site so i can do some research... I have heard some bad press on the breed so I want to be informed
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 27, '11 9:16am PST 
In our grooming practice we base to groom or not decisions on the dog itself, NOT any particular breed. Without grooming the dog it is impossible to make generalizations about how it is going to act.
We have dogs of different breeds which are very difficult to groom but you certainly are not going to be in business long if you refuse to groom any breed based on one problem dog of that breed.
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Gatsby

if it smells- good, eat it
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 27, '11 9:53am PST 
I dont plan on not taking any particular breeds I was just wondering if anyone else did.
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 27, '11 10:19am PST 
Does your insurance carrier say anything about it?

Specifically speaking of "hybrids" (per wiki) currently "40 U.S. states effectively forbid the ownership, breeding and importation" of wolfdogs."

If you live in one of those states and agree to take one in to your shop to groom regardless, if something happens to you you may not be covered. In turn, if something happens to someone else (think other employees, delivery personnel or guests picking up or dropping off other dogs) you personally may be held liable for their injuries as opposed to having the protection of your insurance policy.
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Gatsby

if it smells- good, eat it
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 27, '11 1:30pm PST 
Trigger: how would I find out which states forbid them??
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 27, '11 1:53pm PST 
http://www.wolfdogalliance.org/legislation/statelaws.html

Hope that helps big grin
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Conker

OBEY ME!
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 27, '11 3:00pm PST 
I've met so many "wolf hybrids" that were just Siberian Huskies, Malamutes, GSD's or mixes of those but their owners were convinced they had wolf in them. Wolfdogs have a distinctive appearance (at least to me, I spend a lot of time researching this type of stuff) and tend to not act a thing like dogs or very different than dogs, and all of these "wolf hybrids" I've seen lately were 100% dog.
Most people just don't know any better or think it sounds cooler to have a wolfdog.

But yeah, go with the individual dog, not any particular breed.
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MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 27, '11 11:41pm PST 
Toto,
Thanks.I agree with you completely that decisions should be based on an individual basis not on a breed profile or one bad example of a certain breed. It took me nearly 3 years to convince one of my neighbors that my Akita was not going to eat his children. After seeing that mine are both well behaved and sweet tempered he finally realizes that it's the person who owns them that has done something or failed to do something that makes a dog a problem not what kind of dog it is.
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 28, '11 6:06am PST 
Mika&Kai - this isn't about breed profiling though, true wolfdogs aren't dogs. They are semi-feral to very feral, and that's not something that can be trained out of them.

They are not a domesticated animal in the same sense a dog is and need to be handled much differently.

Would you take a tiger raised in captivity and compare it to a domestic shorthair? Of course not! Which is why in the same respect you cannot take a wolf "hybrid" and compare it to a dog.

For that reason I can't believe any with actual wolfdogs would even bring them in to be groomed by a stranger. Most would know better than to expect them to tolerate that even remotely well.



If I were you, being in a position to educate, if someone brings in a malamute proudly proclaiming it's a part wolf I'd turn them away explaining the regulations and laws in your state prohibit you from grooming the equivalent of a wild animal. Direct them to the nearest wolf sanctuary if they need advice on how to groom themselves because I highly doubt anyone with a license to operate and half a brain would ever try to interact with one on such a personal level...something true wolfdog owners often struggle with themselves.
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Fox

1178619
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 28, '11 7:49am PST 
In addition to ownership laws, you need to check in to rabies law as it pertains to businesses in your area. Your state Dept of Agriculture should be able to help you there.

While a wolf or hybrid can be vaccinated for rabies, and it does work, it has never been tested and confirmed to work on a legal level. The same way the rabies vaccine has been found effective for 7 years to the lifetime of a dog, but because this has not been proven on a legal level all rabies vaccines still only count for 1 or 3 years. Thus all wolves or wolf hybrids are legally unvaccinated and may carry all the risks associated with having an unvaccinated animal in your business.

There may be loopholes with health waivers, or if proven low-content hybrids are considered dogs. It's definitely something you should look into though.
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