GO!

Someone 'hates' Champion Pet Foods.

Discuss ways to improve the quality of your dog's life and longevity through proper nutrition; a place for all of your questions and answers about feeding your pooch!

Please keep discussions fun, friendly, and helpful at all times. Non-informative posts criticizing a particular brand or another poster’s choice of food are not allowed in this Forum. References to any brand of food as "junk," "garbage," or other harsh names will be removed.

  
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Shiver Me- Timbers- "Charlie"

My Little Dog, a- heartbeat at my- feet.<3
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 8, '13 10:05am PST 
She claimed someone should stay away from Orijen because it's "the worst dog food ever", and "if you can't call the company and get an actual Vet on the phone, it's not a good food - that's one way to tell".

She apparently studied pet nutrition for 'many years' and pet food companies get on her nerves. She ALSO claimed MOST pet stores paid employees commission, which means the highest priced dog food sold got the employee more money(COMPLETELY false, as I've worked in SEVERAL pet stores and this was NEVER the case).

So... I inquired further(I feed my dogs Acana). "Also wondering about the hate for Champion. Is it solely based on lack of a Vet? If a Vet told me to feed Science Diet to my epileptic pooch, should I? For the record, my dog was having THREE seizures a month on Beneful, which contains dyes, BHA, BHT, as well as etjoxyquin, grains, and fillers. Swapped to Acana, his seizures happen MAYBE once every couple months. If that ain't proof of diet quality, I don't know what is. I also WAS NOT paid commission at ANY pet store I ever worked at. Considering most Vets are NOT properly trained on nutrition, basing your faith in a company on whether or not they staff a Vet is ridiculous - and defeats the purpose of PERSONAL research when you go by the word of someone getting PAID to speak to you. JMO.

I'd like to ask, what do you consider to be better?? Where are you getting your information and WHAT information for the hate exactly? Far as I'm concerned, other than a raw diet, Champion has one of the best lines of dog food there is(keeping in mind that NOT ALL DOGS do well on such a high protein diet). You can feel free to pm me so we stop hijacking this thread though if you'd like. I am genuinely curious about the 'years of research' you've done and what you have against them. Would you honestly consider them the worst against companies competing grocery store brands?"

Well... Here was her response:
"The main reason I do not like Orijen is because I work at an animal hospital and since orijen has come out with there "high protien" "all natural" pet food we have had over 30 cases of animals come in because the protien levels in the food are too high and they are shutting down the animals kidney and liver. I called to company to see if they were aware of this. they said "We don't care if our food kills animals we are making money and that is all that matters!" then hung up on me.
So yes there are other companies such as ol' roy and store brands that are bad for fillers and high levels of salt but what people dont know is that with all these new "organic" or "all natural" foods now the pet food companies can put these lables on there food if there is only 1 flake of anything organic or all natural in it, and for the most part its nutritional vaule it cooked right out of the food. also just because it says chicken or beef as the first ingredient on the bag doesnt mean that it's a good food! most companies weight raw chicken or pumped it filled with water and salt first then weight it so it can be the first ingredient on the bag. it's all a ploy to get people to buy it.
anyways if you have any questions feel free to ask
Also as far as a raw diet goes it's great if you cook the meat and feed raw veg, but if feeding raw meet just be careful if you have small children."

Thoughts? Anyone want to weigh in? What's your thoughts on her opinion based upon kidney and liver failure caused by high protein? Oh, and BE CAREFUL if you feed raw meat and have children people! Gasp. What do you think about Champion's apparent response to her inquiry about dogs dying? Would like to hear what Dogsters have to say?

I did at one point let the OP know that Orijen IS extremely high in protein and not all dogs do well with it, and that Acana(and a few others I listed) are better, less high-protein alternatives, and more cost effective too.
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Ginger

968251
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 8, '13 10:35am PST 
Sorry, but I sure don't believe a representative from Champion would state the response she claims they did. If so, I would hope the disgruntled employee got canned by now! My thoughts were that this is what SHE interpreted their response to mean to HER. One person's opinion really isn't enough to base a company on. I doubt there is ANY company that pleases everyone! I bet Champion is a whole lot better than Purina or any of those other companies that use tons of cheap fillers, low quality vitamin supplements, and artificial flavorings and preservatives!
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Scruffy

In Loving Memory
 
 
Barked: Fri Nov 8, '13 4:01pm PST 
Most stuff I hear about Champion Pet Foods seems pretty gossipy. For example, our local feed store dropped their entire line of Champion Pet Foods products claiming the company had some shady business practices and would dodge questions and it was becoming increasingly difficult to get a decent supply in stock in store and this had been going on for years. Is that true? I don't know, the only thing I know for sure is that they had a lot of sourcing issues for quite some time. But I've been seeing more people online bashing Champion Pet Foods lately but I'm not sure why considering I'm still seeing a lot more people who seem quite happy with the products, customer service, and the company. shrug

Edited by author Fri Nov 8, '13 4:07pm PST

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Jace

Swiffer
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 9, '13 11:14am PST 
Traditionally if an animal was aging it would be put on a lower protein, as a normal protocol, as this lower protein would produce less nitrogen-a component of protein. The conclusion derived from this would be that a higher protein causes kidney issues and utilizing lowered protein is thought to be the remedy. Studies show that this is simply not the case. CANINE AND FELINE NUTRITION Case, Carey and Hirakawa 1995 states “There is no conclusive evidence showing that protein intake actually contributes to the development of kidney dysfunction in healthy animals." However, one option utilized frequently is the use of highly digestible proteins, not necessarily lower in quantity, but certainly less nitrogen producing. As an example CANINE AND FELINE NUTRITION Case, Carey and Hirakawa 1995 "In general, high-quality animal source proteins provide superior amino acid balances for companion animals, compared with the amino acid balances that are supplied by grain proteins." This works well, particularly in the case of older animals, as their ability to utilize protein decreases. As stated in NRC Wannemacher and McCoy 1996 “Older dogs appear to require somewhat more crude protein to maintain labile protein (so called protein reserves) perhaps as much as 50% more”. As this happens digestibility needs to increase through the use of exceptional protein sources .
Unless is it determined that your dog requires restricted protein due to severe kidney problem, restriction may not be required. As well, restricting will not “save” the pet’s kidneys by feeding a low protein. ." Kirk's Veterinary Therapy XIII, Small Animal Practice Finco, Brown, Barsanti and Bartges states "...restriction of protein intake does not alter the development of renal lesions nor does it preserve renal function. Considering these (research) findings, the authors do not recommend reduction of dietary protein in dogs with renal disease or reduced renal function in order to achieve renoprotective effects.” However in many cases protein could be considered “conditionally toxic” depending on the type of disease or condition.
In relation to protein as an overall “ingredient” in pet food, the type and quality should be examined as discussed earlier. Although high-quality animal sourced proteins generally contain a better, or more complete amino acid profile often times meat sources are higher in Phosphorus. The protein itself, and the Phosphorus it provides will also need to me examined, and Phosphorus reduction is often indicated in the aging pet. As well there are many protein sources that provide excellent amino acids profiles with reduced Phosphorus levels.
The same theory applies to liver issues, protein reduction is necessary based on liver panel abnormalities.
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Bunny

Black dogs rock!
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 10, '13 1:41pm PST 
bump
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Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Nov 17, '13 4:38pm PST 
Zombie, please cite your sources. I'd like to see the literature that makes what you claim "fact".

Here's a punished report based on large-scale studies done by Purina that blatantly proves you wrong:

http://web.archive.org/web/20070330080539/http://www.purina.ca/images/articles/pdf/GeriatricNutritionProtein.pdf

And another from petmd if you don't care for Purina:

http://www.petmd.com/blogs/thedailyvet/ktudor/2012/june/geriatric_pets_need_more_protein#.UolhDcSsiSo
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Bunny

Black dogs rock!
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 18, '13 3:06am PST 
bump
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Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 18, '13 6:30am PST 
Maybe I'm just snotty, but I really can't get behind the alleged highly educated claims of someone who spells "meat" as "meet" (but only half the time), "weigh" as "weight," can't punctuate or capitalize her way out of a paper bag, and doesn't understand that something can't be raw and cooked at the same time. I'm aware my grammar isn't perfect, but yeesh...

Anyhow... Let's pick this apart:

"The main reason I do not like Orijen is because I work at an animal hospital and since orijen has come out with there "high protien" "all natural" pet food we have had over 30 cases of animals come in because the protien levels in the food are too high and they are shutting down the animals kidney and liver.

How did they prove this? As others here have already shown, the link between kidney failure and high protein has been found to be false. So what's her evidence? How much has her intake of liver/kidney failure patients increased over this time span? Is she tracking what foods the liver/kidney failure patients are eating? What percentage eat these foods, versus other brands? How many of them get jerky treats?

I called to company to see if they were aware of this. they said "We don't care if our food kills animals we are making money and that is all that matters!" then hung up on me.

I straight up do not believe this. Can you ask for worse PR? No company, no matter how deplorable, would ever come right out and say that.

So yes there are other companies such as ol' roy and store brands that are bad for fillers and high levels of salt but what people dont know is that with all these new "organic" or "all natural" foods now the pet food companies can put these lables on there food if there is only 1 flake of anything organic or all natural in it,

This is blatantly false. Or at the very least requires a lot of twisting and leaps of logic.

Check this link: FDA.gov and look toward the bottom of the page, under "Other Label Claims."

"Natural" does have a definition, in regard to the product as a whole. A food will either be natural or not.

You can't actually label a pet food "organic" at all. You can claim that it contains USDA organic ingredients, as long as it does, but a pet food as a whole can't be organic because there is no criteria for such a product.

and for the most part its nutritional vaule it cooked right out of the food.

Well, yes. That has nothing to do with Champion, or any specific brand of kibble. It's simply the nature of kibble. Bashing one brand as being inferior for this makes absolutely no sense.

also just because it says chicken or beef as the first ingredient on the bag doesnt mean that it's a good food! most companies weight raw chicken or pumped it filled with water and salt first then weight it so it can be the first ingredient on the bag. it's all a ploy to get people to buy it.

Again, yes, but in this case Champion specifically does NOT do this!

anyways if you have any questions feel free to ask
Also as far as a raw diet goes it's great if you cook the meat


That's not a raw diet.

and feed raw veg, but if feeding raw meet just be careful if you have small children."

I've said it before... If anti-raw advocates allow their dogs to drag food all over their house, don't clean, and let their children play in their dog's feces, I am very proud to be a raw feeder!

Edited by author Mon Nov 18, '13 6:34am PST

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Shiver Me- Timbers- "Charlie"

My Little Dog, a- heartbeat at my- feet.<3
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 18, '13 7:57pm PST 
Ha.. I replied.. I gave her links, I sent her info, and I even asked many of your questions in regards to things, Ember and this was her reply:

"Like I said I have had this same talk with many people! Believe what you want but I am not fighting about it! To be honest if I knew that's all you wanted was an argument I wouldn't have wrote you. You asked why I didn't like it. Weather or not you want to believe the information or not is up to you but I am not up for a debate"

shrug
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Ember FDX

Go Go Devil- Bunnies!
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 19, '13 9:23am PST 
Heh. So we're free to ask questions, as long as they stroke her ego and don't challenge her irrational views. Anything else is picking a fight. Got it.
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