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Two Boxers in the Backcountry, Wyoming

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Daisy

Just remember,- it's all mine.
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 2, '11 11:53pm PST 
So we're moving to Wyoming with our two Boxers Daisy and Boo.

We plan to spend a lot of time hiking/backpacking in and around our new state.

I've done a lot of research and noticed that the National Parks are out, and State Parks and Nat. Forests are where we will spend most of our time. Any backcountry hikers out there with any tips? First Aid kit musts...? I'm not to worried about rattlesnakes, both kids are healthy adult dogs and I'm looking into the vaccine. Porcupines have me a bit nervous though...

Thanks!
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Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 4, '11 12:39pm PST 
You can also use BLM and Wilderness Area land as well as Forest Service for hiking with dogs. Just be respectful and don't take a dog that isn't ready for it (or keep them leashed.) One of the places I've been had a lot of anti-dog signs (even one warning people that technical rescue crews will NOT rescue stranded dogs, only humans, with a little cartoon of a dog falling off a cliff) because too many people bring untrained dogs that chase wildlife, bark at people, poop everywhere, and are a general nuisance. So don't be that person!

I don't really have a plan for rattlesnakes myself, because I've never taken a dog hiking in a snakey area. I don't think there is much you can do, anyway, besides get out as fast as you can to take them to a vet. frown A first aid kit is a great idea for minor owies though, like cuts and bee stings. I'd take alcohol wipes, antimicrobial ointment, maybe some dog-safe painkillers for wounds. (Bandages are pretty useless on most dogs.) Maybe booties for sore paws too.

I don't bring water for Bruno (or myself, for that matter) in mountains where there is lots of cold, clear, fast-moving surface water (my criteria for drinkability) and (knock on wood) no giardia for either of us yet. I'd bring iodine tablets if water quality was uncertain, and bring ALL my water from home if there's no reliable water sources on the hike. For his food, I take the most calorie-dense dry kibble (Origen, EVO, etc.) I can find so I don't have to bring as much of it.

have fun and stay safe!
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Boo

1183316
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 4, '11 8:21pm PST 
Thanks for the tips. We've got two well trained dogs, had to be or a Boxer will run you ragged, especially two! smile We always walk them leashed, might let them run a bit if we're in a backwoods open area with out folks around, they don't go far but do need to run occasionally. Thanks for the idea on the food as well, that was helpful.
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Halo

Howling good- times to be had- with me.
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 4, '11 9:01pm PST 
I lived most of my life in porcupine country (Montana) and only ONCE in all 31 years i lived there did I ever have a dog get quills, and I have never in my life been w/o a dog or two at least. It is painful for the dog, but just keep them from pawing at them and get to a vet who will give either local or general (depending on the dog and the vet) antithetic and remove the quills, then, again vet's preference, topical or internal antibiotics for a bit to prevent the wounds from being infected.

As long as you keep rabies current, that's all porcupines amount to, a painful lesson to the poor dog and a vet bill. I'd be more concerned with raccoons. They have done more damage to dogs I've had than porcupines, snakes or any other wild animals. Don't feed outdoors, raccoons love dog food and will sometimes fight the dog for it. Some dogs will chase, and catch raccoons, causing a fight. Those devils are the biggest dog problem as far as wild animals I have ever had to deal with.
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Boo

1183316
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 5, '11 8:45pm PST 
Didn't even think about raccoons. Thanks!
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Lucille

I am the Sock- Bandit!!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 6, '11 6:44am PST 
Any type of food attracts bears. You'll see reminders about how to store your food safely, tie it way up in a tree limb and that sort of thing. LISTEN and heed those warnings. Some places allow you to bury your waste and that of the dog, some make you carry it out. I've done that, too.

I camped very deep one night in Western Wy, had to sign in at the trail head and sign out again the next morning. I didn't have a dog with me and I was by myself. Went to sleep and woke up in the wee hours because I heard strange huffing sounds and milling about. Turns out my tent was in the middle of an elk herd sleeping and munching grass overnight. I counted over a hundred of them. I think about that now that I want to camp with the dog. I could easily have been trampled if a dog barked and freaked them out in the middle of the night. They were putting their hooves down inches from my bag. They raised the temp inside the tent because they were so close all around me. It was cool, it's something I'll never forget, but not so sure how fun it would have been with a dog. Then again, maybe they would have smelled a dog and moved on. It was in a designated flat area for tenting...I double-checked in the morning to make sure I wasn't in a wrong spot.

Anyway, I firmly believe that if someone can't call their dogs off of wildlife (manage prey drive) they don't belong there with their dogs. There are so few places that wildlife can survive now, we've pushed them out of so many of their habitats, that stressing them further is wrong.
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Milton

Im just a little- guy
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 6, '11 7:53am PST 
This one time I was on my bicycle riding around my neighborhood. It was the late evening and was too dark. I had no light and headed home. I was riding on my street and saw a shaggy dog. Being a dog lover I rode up to it and was going pet the dog. The dog turned around and made a swoosh sound. I realized it was a porcupine. Ahhhh! It scared me. I never saw one up close before. I bought a light a few days later.

I think my dog would be terrified of this creature. It was pretty big. My dog is scared of farm animals. He's a city dawg.

I bring my dog into the backcountry. He is good off-leash in this situation. I don't bring a first aide kit, but should. All of my hikes are day trips, but I still bring a solar blanket, extra food, and plenty of water. I bring my dog snacks. He burns a lot of calories hiking. He also needs to take breaks. Being small and older I don't take him on trails above the moderate rating. The more advanced trails are sometimes very hard on dogs. Another thing is to make sure your dogs have short nails before hiking. Long nails will crack and break making this a painful experience.

Bring enough water for your dogs and you, unless you know there will be lots on the trail. I bring a small bowl with me and a large water bottle.
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Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 6, '11 10:55am PST 
true that, Lucille! I totally forgot about bears. We don't have grizz in Oregon these days, but even a little blackie can do a LOT of damage to a tent or backpack if they want your food... Good thing they are usually scared of dogs, though. I also bought bear bells to put on Bruno's collar so that he won't be able to sneak up on any wild creature by accident.

I doubt the elk would even have come near if you had a dog with you. Prey animals are so easily spooked by dogs. And I would ALWAYS tether the dog at night if he wasn't in the tent with me, or if I wasn't using a tent, so they couldn't go running off after night noises.
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Bailee

Here\'s my Wubba- - now play with- me!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 6, '11 10:56am PST 
I don't really have anything to add (other than skunks can be a pain in the neck), I just wanted to say - YAY, MORE BOXERS!!!" cheer
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Daisy

Just remember,- it's all mine.
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 7, '11 5:18pm PST 
Thanks Bailee! wink

Again good stuff. I've been looking into the EzyDog Vario 6 leash. It looks awesome, and hands free for the trail. We, being my wife and I, are planning on doing at least several months worth of day hikes with them before we ever attempt an overnight. I thought about bears. smile There are backpackable electric fences you can put around your tent for the night. Probably overkill, but piece of mind for the wife. smile
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