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BSL may soon be eliminated in my city

This is a forum to discuss legislation and legal matters pertaining to the rights and welfare of dogs. Please remember to counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice and responses.

  
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Farley

Farlekiin the- Dragonborn
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 10, '12 1:19pm PST 
In Edmonton, Canada, pit bull breeds arne't banned, but we have had BSL in place for a while. Pit bull breeds have been automatically put under a "restricted dog" category

Animal Licensing and Control Bylaw defines a "restricted dog" as any dog that:

Has chased, attacked or bitten any person or animal causing physical injury and resulting in a conviction under this bylaw.

Has chased, attacked or bitten any person or animal on more than one occasion, with or without causing physical injury, and resulting in separate convictions under this bylaw.

Has been the subject of an order under the
Alberta Dangerous Dogs Act.

Is certified by an Alberta licensed veterinarian to be primarily of the Staffordshire Bull Terrier breed, as defined by the Canadian Kennel Club.

Is certified by an Alberta licensed veterinarian to be primarily of the American Staffordshire Terrier breed, as defined by the Canadian Kennel Club.

Just recently, the Edmonton Humane Society and local Pit Bull rescues presented their case in city council to have BSL bylaws repealed. This would mean that aggressive dogs are treated as aggressive dogs, regardless of breed.

The EHS had this to say about how the meeting went:

"The Edmonton Humane Society is pleased to tell you that the City of Edmonton's Community Services Committee has accepted City Administration's recommendation to eliminate Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) from the Animal Control Bylaw. We do not support BSL as we feel it is discriminatory. The next step is for City Council's final approval; the recommendation now faces all of City Council on October 17. We are hopeful that the Bylaw will be amended at that time."
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Pandora

1273773
 
 
Barked: Wed Nov 14, '12 1:12pm PST 
Unfortuantely, I do not agree with this. PB's were genetically designed to be agressive and it will always be in their genes. I think that BSL is a reasonable and responsible way of keeping the public informed of their genetic tendencies.
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Farley

Farlekiin the- Dragonborn
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 15, '12 1:41am PST 
While I agree that aggression can be highly genetic, there are MANY breeds that can show aggression because of their inherent drives. Pit Bull breeds, being very popular, are the ones being punished for people's mistakes and irresponsibility.

BSL doesn't serve to educate, because it does not put any responsibility on the HUMAN, instead it simply blames the breed for being the breed it is.
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Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 15, '12 7:16am PST 
First of all applauseapplauseapplause for yet another jurisdiction wising up about BSL

Pandora, I feel you are misinformed as many people are. The bully breeds were NOT historically created and bred to be globally aggressive. That is a complete misconception. Bull terriers and the like were trained to be aggressive towards the animals they were expected to fight.

A dog was prized for the tenacity and strength to bring down a bull or being willing to please it's handler by killing another canine. However a dog that was a "man-hater" or human aggressive would not be tolerated. A dog that attacked humans wouldn't be allowed to live nevermind breed.

During a staged dog fight the canines involved had to be completely human submissive. Each trainer had to wash the others dog pregame, then the dogs had to willingly allow their injuries to be treated during the fight. This philosophy created the bullies of today.

It's a little known fact that bullies by nature are one of the most people friendly breed groups out there. If you're brave enough test it yourself sometime...walk up to the average boxhead and it's owner sometime to say hello. Chances are that imposing creature will begin a wag that starts at the tail and wags his whole being. Bullies are usually useless as guard dogs. For a treat or tushy rub feel free to clear the house...

There ARE mutant bullies, and shepards, and dobermans, and rotties, and dachshunds too. Then there is situational aggression. Would Sophie or Callie guard the house? No. If someone tried to hurt me or my daughter would they defend us? Yes. And that would be justified. Would they try to eat our mail carrier? Only if he was a squirrel, which would be highly unlikely.

But as far as random violence and dogs I believe in punishing the deed not the perceived breed.
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Kolbe

Where can I run- today?
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 15, '12 8:04am PST 
German Shepherds are also often included in breed restrictions and BSL in several places, so hopefully you are well prepared for that Pandora.... in the meantime I suggest actually researching the American Pit Bull Terrier. Yes, they are not for everybody (just like German Shepherds are not for everybody...) and yes, they CAN be more prone to dog aggression (note I was specific, dog aggression) -- but so are many other breeds....are you okay with including all of those? Also are you okay with the rampant breed mis-identification, such as labs frequently being labeled "pit bulls" because they may have a blocky head? It's fine if that's really how you feel and you are ok with laws that limit and restrict ownership (and also kill) pit bulls, rottweilers, german shepherds, and the list grows and grows -- and is enforced by people in government with no professional animal experience who can't tell a pit bull from a dalmatian.... also I implore you to look up statistics -- cities with BSL in place do not have lowered bite statistics. Again... deed, not breed.

And lastly, to say the genes will "always" be there is a farce...it COULD theoretically be systematically bred out. Not all lines of every pit bull on earth are dog aggressive. Of course this will not happen because it would need to be a very controlled effort, not to mention you can't stop the loser thugs breeding poor specimens for dog fighting (which, by the way, those people are not following BSL laws, so with those laws you are only punishing law abiding citizens who actually take care of their pit bull dogs). Ultimately it is a failure and makes no sense, and is a knee-jerk reaction.

Dangerous Dog laws that do not target specific breeds is a better and more logical option.

Edited by author Thu Nov 15, '12 8:13am PST

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Maci & Harley & Jigar

Golden butts
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 15, '12 8:44am PST 
So what did people who have a restricted breed have to do? Just curious.
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Lucille

I am the Sock- Bandit!!!
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 15, '12 12:08pm PST 
Pandora I encourage you to do some real independent research regarding the history of bull terriers and the American Pit Bull terrier because your post is factually incorrect. Also, you don't demonstrate much knowledge regarding breeding and resultant breed characteristics. Aggressive and submissive temperament characteristics can certainly be changed through purposeful breeding, there's no such thing as any of that always being present in the genes.

Check out Belyaev's fifty year long longitudinal study of captive silver foxes in Russia. Their behavioral response to humans was changed along with physical characteristics in a relatively short period of time. Canine genetics are incredibly tractable compared to other mammals, even within just a few generations, that's why we have the high amount of diversity of breeds and breed traits that we do today.
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Lucille

I am the Sock- Bandit!!!
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 15, '12 12:11pm PST 
Farley, that's wonderful that they'll start looking at aggression on a case by case basis, rather than simply condemning an entire type of dog.
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Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 15, '12 5:51pm PST 
We have to be open minded about breeds in general. When I was a kid my mother was bitten...deeply bitten by her friend's German Shepard. The woman was trying to help my mother get friendly with him. He bit her on the butt while she was turning to give him a treat. Fortunately the way girdles were constructed in those days some of the rubber cushioned the bite or it could have been much worse.

Fast forward ten years and my best friend has a German Shepard. Riggs would have given his life for my buddy. This dog enjoyed the company of everyone from grandchildren to complete strangers. SoI know German Shepards can go a whole bunch of directions depending on how they're raised, same thing for ANY dog breed.
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 15, '12 8:06pm PST 
Kolbe applause Dog aggression =/= human aggression.

Many people are scared of German Shepherds and consider them vicious and dangerous. I've had countless people scramble out of my way or cross to the other side when I'm walking my dog down the street. There are people with prejudices against every breed, and the more BSL is allowed to go unchecked, the more breeds will be included. BSL affects everyone
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