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CASE REPORT: LARYNGEAL PARALYSIS

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 4, '13 7:36am PST 
Octavia, had you read the entire thread you would have noted that Bubba's owner is presenting an alternative solution to the surgical method of dealing with LP. Surgery is not always a viable alternative and often does not yield a good outcome. Something as simple and inexpensive as Benadryl is a promising course of treatment and should definitely be tried before resorting to surgical intervention.
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Quincy

We don't doodle!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 4, '13 7:51am PST 
FYI, Laryngeal paralysis and laryngeal collapse are two totally different conditions. LC is usually a result of injury to the cartilage surrounding the larynx and results in this cartilage collapsing and causing an obstructed airway. This condition is most often seen in smaller breeds, particularly brachycephalic breeds. It is often seen in dogs who are allowed to pull excessively on collars. Surgery is often the only treatment successful.
Laryngeal paralysis is the paralysis of the muscles and tendons surrounding the larynx, and is usually seen in older, large breed dogs, particularly Labrador Retrievers. While many vets recommend surgery, it is rarely very helpful and often causes MORE problems and difficulty in breathing. This condition is thought to be genetic and studies are currently underway in the Labrador to help identify a genetic marker if possible.
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Sonny

the world's- first blond,- agility Beagle
 
 
Barked: Sat Jul 6, '13 7:52pm PST 
Bubba hasn't check in since last fall, but i'm still hoping to get an answer:

Sonny recently had a bout of "reverse sneezing" ( aka. paroxysmal respiration or pharyngeal gag reflex). I've had dogs that did this once in a great while, but not like this. Sonny was having these symptoms several times a day and they didn't go away quickly. Some of the typical remedies for reverse sneeze had little or brief effect. He was otherwise his usual self, so I wasn't concerned.

Then a week ago he was so sick he hardly moved for 24 hours. Not normal. He seemed to have a fever and didn't want to move, and slept all day.
The Vet diagnosed an infection. He had loose smelly stool and "doggy post nasal drip", for lack of a better description. A week of Clavamox put him back on his feet. Benedryl was an option if he didn't feel better in 24 hours

My Sister's Labrador has a different problem. She is an overweight Labrador. When she exerts herself she gets a "click" and raspy breathing (Stridor), she was diagnosed as having a collapsed windpipe (tracheal stenosis). That must be an exaggeration of the problem, she certainly has a soft windpipe and partially obstructed breathing.

Good to know the more dangerous conditions and the additional symptoms to be wary of….

Thanks Bubba, hope you are well old man!
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Octavia

I'm Not a Pit- Bull
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 7, '13 3:51pm PST 
Toto, I'm asking that you don't just down my throat on every single one of my posts, thank you. smile
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Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 7, '13 4:35pm PST 
Octavia, I will correct miss-information when it affects a dogs health no matter who posts it. Laryngeal paralysis is in no way, no form, no how related to laryngeal collapse, and research on BOTH shows that surgery is at best, a poor last resort to correcting laryngeal collapse and is pretty much a horror when preformed on Laryngeal paralysis. For LP, the only surgical option is to stitch the laryngeal flaps open, which has its own set of problems and issues, most notably pretty constant pneumonia and/or constant vomiting from saliva constantly entering the lungs. If Benadryl can save just ONE dog from this surgery it is certainly well worth it, and your stating that surgery is the only option and must be performed immediately is totally wrong, both for LC AND especially for LP.
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Member Since
07/03/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 18, '13 12:40pm PST 
UPDATE FOR ROCKIT: dog Good old RockIt experienced a collapse during a walk about a week ago. His usual activity for a walk has been to scamper through the woods on either side of the road, crashing the bush and rushing the hills. Instead he was walking beside me with without energy and breathing with great difficulty, heaving chest and hoarse intake of breath. Treatment with Benadryl had provided a little abatement of symptoms, but he was not improving. I took him in to see a veterinary surgeon who had numerous larynx operations in her experience, having a good success rate. He received a laryngeal tie-back (left lateral) day before yesterday. Today, he is breathing without difficulty. He is not bouncy, like the new puppy (the new understudy). But he is comfortable and more active. I will need to be cautious, feeding him in small amounts until he learns to eat with the larynx held open. Drinking will be in small frequent amounts and he will be discouraged from swimming. But he is no longer suffocating slowly in front of my eyes. And he seems happy and responsive. He seems to understand that I have done something to help him breath. When he reaches to scratch the surgical incision with his rear foot (more reflex than irritation) he responds to verbal command to stop it or at worst, gently pull his foot away. He's a great old warrior of many hunting seasons, faithful and hard working. Although the cost of surgical treatment was significant, I think it has saved his life. At 14 years old, he has only a few years left. But he will not die of something that I can prevent. In the end, the Benadryl treatment was not efficacious, but it was a non-invasive place to start. The surgery has been successful so far, but he will be vulnerable in the future- a risk that I think is better than his immediate suffering or imminent death.
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Member Since
07/03/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 18, '13 2:50pm PST 
I'd like to add my thanks for "Bubba's owners". Their thoughtful analysis and creative approach to treat their Lab was a very helpful starting point. Using their recommendations, I was able to calibrate dosages for RockIt's weight. I allowed sufficient time for the treatment to take effect and saw a little change. But RockIt was having difficulty with breathing after climbing a set of stairs and drawing breath with difficulty at rest- I could not continue the Benadryl treatment further. Laryngeal paralysis seems to derive from loss of control of the larynx: somewhere between the brain, through the nerve and the larynx, there is a failure to connect. The range of success with Benadryl suggests to me that Laryngeal Paralysis may be caused by a variety of dysfunctions in that pathway requiring a variety of treatments. I was glad to be able to begin therapy with a non-invasive treatment, despite the lack of success. In the end, the left-lateral laryngeal tie-back presents the risk of aspiration pneumonia and death. But RockIt is now much more healthy and comfortable than he was. The surgery was not horrible. The surgeon communicated the process, the risks, and the costs very thoroughly. She clearly has a healing heart and kind feeling for her canine patients and human clients. I will keep this thread posted on further developments. Thanks everyone for your interest!
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Member Since
11/30/2013
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 30, '13 9:58am PST 
My 12.5 year old lab was just diagnosed with LP. She is currently on cortisone twice a day and benadryl 3 times a day. I would like to begin the Bonine too, but hesitate due to a post on this site (9/11) the owners began both the dramamine and the Bonine and experianced good results, but received a private email from goshannon and stopped the Bonine. Not knowing what info the email contained I am leary to add the Bonine. Can you offer any advice?
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Sunny

It's hard being- a Sunny Bunny!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 22, '14 9:17pm PST 
My dog Sunny chow/retriever mix is likely going to be diagnosed with Lar par. There is a yahoo group with tons of information but not sure the antihistamine exists there. Search in yahoo groups for laryngeal paralysis if interested.
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