GO!

A dog with a destiny

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  


Member Since
10/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 17, '13 9:03am PST 
Hello everyone,

My story is as follows;

I live at home with my mom and brother. I just graduated so I'll be leaving home next year and my brother the year after. I'm a bit afraid she'll get lonely, so maybe I'll buy her a dog to keep her company and guard her!Though, I dont really know what breed. I thought a rough collie would be nice, but the long glorious coat could be to high maintenance. A bernese seems nice as well, but I havent looked in to it as much.

My mom is a bit frail due to a hip replacement so a hyperactive dog might not be best. The ideal would be a kind, loving, protective dog that enjoys walks but does not need loads of activity or is very high maintenance.

Can youguys help me figure this out? Thanks!
[notify]
Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 17, '13 9:15am PST 
Important question: does your mother genuinely want a dog? Or do you merely think she does?
[notify]


Member Since
10/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 17, '13 9:22am PST 
She really wants one. In her own words: 'I want a lassie'.
[notify]

Shiver Me- Timbers- "Charlie"

My Little Dog, a- heartbeat at my- feet.<3
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 17, '13 11:00am PST 
If she's had a hip replacement and needs a lower energy dog, then a rough collie wouldn't necessarily be a great idea. What does she like about 'lassie'? The temperament and the training she had, or her looks?

Ultimately, I'd look at rescues and shelters for an older, calmer dog - it doesn't necessarily have to be a senior either. You can usually find dogs that are lower energy and around 4-8 years old too. If you go through a rescue, you can find a dog whose temperament and training will be better known than at a shelter, and the rescue can work with you to find the right dog to suit her needs. smile
[notify]


Member Since
10/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 18, '13 6:07am PST 
Hmm, thanks for the tips, but no breeds that fit the discription?
[notify]
UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 18, '13 8:05am PST 
Like Charlie said, I'd look for an adult rescue. It sounds like a puppy of any breed wouldn't be the best fit as most puppies are both high energy and high maintenance (potty training, preventing chewing, obedience training, providing a lot of mental and physical exercise, ect.).

As far as a dog that's kind, loving, and protective, that's most dogs that are bonded to their owner (and honestly, the majority of the time, just having a dog is enough of a deterrent to provide protection). As Charlie said, a good rescue organization could help you find a great match. Unless you/she have more specific requirements, I would worry less about breed and more about finding an individual dog with the right temperament and energy level, which could very well be a fantastic mixed breed puppy

Edited by author Fri Oct 18, '13 8:21am PST

[notify]


Member Since
10/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 18, '13 11:26am PST 
Great, thanks! The puppy training wont be that much of an issue, as my brother and I will be home to lend a hand the first two years. When both of us are gone, the dog will be 2 years old. Thats why I was interested in specific breeds. But apparantly its isn't that important.

Thanks guys!
[notify]
Addy, CGC

Let's go for a- walk!
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 18, '13 2:10pm PST 
Maybe consider a rescue greyhound. They tend toward the calm and affectionate, and while outside you need either a leash or a good fence, because if they start chasing something they'll be a long way off before they realize they've lost you, inside they are gentle couch potatoes.

Other sighthound breeds differ in detail but tend to share the basic traits of needing a leash outside but being calm, affectionate couch potatoes inside. Something to think about, anyway.
[notify]
UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 18, '13 2:30pm PST 
The thing about getting a puppy and then leaving it with your mother after two years is that many dogs still have lots of energy at 2 years old, are still boisterous, and still need plenty of vigorous exercise (i.e. more than a leashed walk). A lot of large breeds don't settle down until they're 3-5 years old. With a puppy, it's much harder to know what you're going to get when the dog is grown. Even within one breed, there can be a lot of variation. With an adult, it's much easier to assess the dog because it's already mature.

If you're set on a puppy, I would consider a small breed, as it sounds like most 2 year old large dogs might be too much for her to handle. Small breeds tend to mature faster than large, so by 2 years old, a small dog should be easier to manage. Some small breeds that tend to be lower on the energy scale you could look into: Shih Tzu, Tibetan Spaniel, Pug, Japanese Chin, French Bulldog. Some of them do have grooming requirements, but if she's willing to brush occasionally or go to a groomer, it shouldn't be too difficult to keep up with on a small dog.

The other thing about choosing to get a puppy is where you're going get it from. Are you planning to rescue or buy from a breeder? Shelters do get puppies, but you won't have a great idea how large the dog will be, the kind of temperament it will have, or its energy level as an adult. If you decide to go the breeder route, if you find a good breeder, the parents will have been health tested for genetic problems and the breeder will be able to match you with the puppy most likely to fit your lifestyle, but you'll be looking at paying anywhere for $1000-2000 for a well bred puppy of most breeds. There are, of course, breeders who sell puppies for much less, but there will be no real health guarantees or temperament assessments from the breeder.

Again, more information would be helpful. Does she have a size preference? How much grooming is she willing to do? How does she feel about shedding? Does she want a cuddly dog, or something more aloof? Has your family had a dog or puppy before?

Edited by author Fri Oct 18, '13 10:49pm PST

[notify]
Bryce

blues- are- cool
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 19, '13 5:07pm PST 
bryce about knocks me and my hubby over. collies are wonderfull, loving, smart dogs. but they do get good sized.and they dont always realize how big they are. bryce is a bed hog, and a lap dog.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2