GO!

Ideal breed? Relatively quiet, medium-to-low energy, small-to-medium size, highly trainable.

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
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Member Since
06/17/2011
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 6:18am PST 
What I can offer:
- Studio flat with a small garden (hence quiet).
- 2-3 30-45 min walks a day
- Consistent mental training (I am very new to dog training, but I want a dog for obedience trials and clicker training).
- Doggy day-care 2-3 times a week.
- Live with elderly people and get constant visits from nephews and nieces a few days out of the week. Plus friends have dogs.
- Rarely away for more than 4 hours.

What I want:
- A dog that can walk for more than 10 minutes in the heat. My friend has a Frenchie and she is just exhausted after 5-10 minutes while I was just getting started. I am trying to get fit and active, I want a friend who will hold me accountable, not tempt me back into the couch.
- A dog with an off switch, especially when indoors.
- A dog that won't explode if we miss a day or two of walks (heat and dust storms can be brutal here).
- Relatively quiet. Not a yapper or barker.

What I can't offer or don't want:
- Again, elderly people and young children, the dog can't be too boisterous indoors. Outdoors they can be the Flash on RedBull for all I care.
- No large fenced area. There are technically no dog parks around here. My garden and the size of the doggie day care is the most I can offer.
- No real agility/flyball/obedience clubs near me. I hear one MAY be built an hour's drive away but not sure when its done.
- Hot. I live in a very hot place, summers are around 45-50 C. The dog will live indoors but it is still not ideal for brachy dogs or many of the spitzes.


Dogs I am considering:
- Cavalier King Charles, great dogs but a tad too small. I want them in a bigger package.
- English Cocker Spaniel, perfect size but I heard they have anger issues and a nightmare to groom.
- English Shepherd, a border collie without the neurosis! Love them but they are too big and I worry I wont be able to match their activity level.
- Whippets/Greyhounds, **LOVE** their aloof nature and energy, **HATE** their look. Its their whip-like tail they always tuck in that freaks me out. Always makes me think they are scared and abused.
- Shiba Inu - love their catlike nature, but not always so responsive to training...
- Mini poodle. Heard they could be quiet yappy. Not a fan of the coarse fur/hair and the intense grooming requirements.
- Corgi (Pems), because, well, Corgi.


Any help or more information would be greatly appreciated! And before anyone suggests it, adopting a mix from a shelter isn't an option. I already foster and volunteer occasionally but would rather have a documented puppy this time around. Thanks!
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Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 10:30am PST 
If you're not a fan of greyhounds/whippets, have you looked into similar breeds like windhounds?
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Tyler

Whippy- The- Whipador
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 10:53am PST 
A Cocker Spaniel could work really well, as long as you don't go for the working types who have insane amounts of energy!
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Harvey

Design jewelry,- not dogs!
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 11:02am PST 
Chinese Crested!!! We LOVE the heat, are quite calm and quiet inside but will go as long as you like outside with you. Minor grooming, basically just to tidy us up. We love kids if exposed to them correctly, and do not need a huge yard.
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Arya

Serious Face
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 11:36am PST 
Would not recommend a Shiba for someone new to training. They are a handful as pups, lots of patience required for training, need LOTS of exercise or they'll eat your walls. A 5 year old Shiba would fit what you're looking for much better, but it'd be a long road to get there.

A whippet really would be just right for what you're looking for. Size, energy levels, grooming, heat, etc etc. Everything but the looks... XD

What about a collie? There's the long-haired rough coated collie, but they also come in a smooth coat that's shorter and looks easy to manage. It sounds like they only get bark-ie when bored and left alone to much, but you said you'll be home a lot and they're very trainable. As long as they get adequate exercise, they are calm inside.
http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/collie?WT.mc_id=cc_yahoo

Edited by author Wed Sep 11, '13 11:37am PST

[notify]
Toto, CD, RN, CGC

We don't do- doodles!!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 3:01pm PST 
A collie is certainly going to be larger than an English shepherd, which the OP has rejected due to it's larger size. Collies are no where, no how near small to medium size.
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Arya

Serious Face
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 7:44pm PST 
Ohhh you're right Toto, they're bigger than I thought they were... >_
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Member Since
06/17/2011
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 12, '13 1:50am PST 
Oh wow, thanks for the responses guys!

Cohen and Arya; I know! I fell in love with the whippet temperament when I had to foster a desert dog. She had the barrel chest and is the size of a small sighthound (17kg), the ears of a German Shepherd and the tail of a spitz. She was gorgeous but her personality just won me over. I never realized I like aloof but gentle/elegant dogs until then (maybe because I was a cat person for so long.) Unfortunately I wasn't able to keep her since she was highly reactive, especially around men. While I was willing to work with her my parents weren't as patient. Hopefully once I have my own place I am permanently adopting her! Unfortunately that won't happen within the next year or two.

I have been browsing whippets and have been eyeing their Long-Haired cousins. Any idea how their personality may be different than the typical whippet?

Tyler: Which is a shame because I LOVE working cockers! The original 'spaniel' look and coat is just gorgeous. However I know I don't have an endless acreage farm to take care of them so I'll just dream for now! English Cockers are adorable but I always hear about them being a bit more 'snappy' and bitey than most breeds. I worry with the kids around even if they won't play with the dog while unsupervised. Maybe if I can find a very specific breeder or an assured line it would make it easier.

Edited by author Thu Sep 12, '13 1:51am PST

[notify]
Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 12, '13 7:09am PST 
I have been browsing whippets and have been eyeing their Long-Haired cousins. Any idea how their personality may be different than the typical whippet?

LHWs are pretty similar in temperament to typical whippets. However, LHWs are not looked upon fondly by sighthound enthusiasts. It's generally accepted that LHWs are whippet/sheltie crosses, and the "breed" came from unscrupulous beginnings. LHW enthusiasts aren't terribly active in the sighthound community, so the dogs aren't coursing proven or generally worked the same way.

I've looked into LHWs myself recently. As someone who values the working heritage of a breed, I've opted to pass on them despite meeting some really lovely dogs. This is why I suggested you check out silken windhounds. They're similar to whippets, they have the rough coat that I love and while they're a generally new breed they're coursed regularly by enthusiasts. From chatting with folks firmly entrenched in sighthound culture, they're considered much more highly than LHWs. Just a thought!
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Tyler

Whippy- The- Whipador
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 12, '13 8:14am PST 
Guest, I think, like with most breeds, getting a puppy from an established, responsible breeder who knows their lines and what they are producing minimises any chances of instability in temperament. I know "rage syndrome" is something that people sometimes refer to when talking about Cocker Spaniels ( especially the English ), but it's rare and not something I'd take into serious consideration if I was set on the breed.

A well bred Cocker should be friendly, with a sweet disposition and are well suited to most lifestyles. They don't have the nickname "merry little Cocker" for nothing wink
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