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Terminology about "hybrid" dogs

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Noah

Herpaderp-apotam- us
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 11, '13 7:21pm PST 
I've tried googling this to try and clear some things up but I honestly can't find anything helpful amongst all the junk pages. So here goes:

When is the term "hybrid" applicable to dogs, if ever?

I know lots of people like to use the term when it comes to the "designer mixes," but that isn't right because a dog is a dog is a dog. Right?

I also hear the term used in reference to wolfdogs, but I'm not sure if that's right either.

Someone please explain to me. As I said, when I tried to Google it, mostly I got things like "Designer Dog Kennel Club" and "How Breeders Create A Hybrid Designer Dog," which make me want to slam my head against the keyboard.
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Shiver Me- Timbers- "Charlie"

My Little Dog, a- heartbeat at my- feet.<3
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 11, '13 7:49pm PST 
Well, a wolfdog would be considered a hybrid, as would a coyote/dog, etc.

A tiger/lion is considered a hybrid as well.

Designer mixes are just that. Designer MIXED breeds. Nothing more, really.

Hybrid

I think designer breeders go with the term hybrid both out of lack of education, and, if they know correctly, simply as a sales pitch because it sounds fancier.
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Natasha - 美花- ~Beautiful- Flower~

Let's play tag!- You're it!
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 11, '13 7:58pm PST 
I've been pretty curious about this as well. I used to think that hybrid anything was the result of two similar species getting together, such as a lion/tiger or donkey/horse, but the resulting off spring being unable to procreate. Then I kept hearing about wolf/dog hybrid or coyote/dog hybrid, but the offspring could procreate, so that confused me and I figured I just didn't understand the term properly, but I never researched the matter. Then the designer dog craze popped up in full force and the word hybrid got tossed around so much I just gave up trying to figure it all out! laugh out loud
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Arya

Serious Face
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 11, '13 8:42pm PST 
I've heard the term hybrid commonly used for the offspring of two purebred dogs of different breeds.

The Merrium Webster dictionary definition does include the word breed. :o

"1: an offspring of two animals or plants of different races, breeds, varieties, species, or genera"
With one of the examples being "a hybrid of two roses".

Oh oh!

"An organism that is the offspring of two parents that differ in one or more inheritable characteristics, especially the offspring of two different varieties of the same species or the offspring of two parents belonging to different species. In agriculture and animal husbandry, hybrids of different varieties and species are bred in order to combine the favorable characteristics of the parents. Hybrids often display hybrid vigor . The mule, which is the offspring of a male donkey and a female horse, is an example of a hybrid. It is strong for its size and has better endurance and a longer useful lifespan than its parents. However, mules are sterile, as are many animals that are hybrids between two species."

From the American Heritage Science Dictionary.

If it's two species are bred together, they have to be pretty close genetically to produce offspring that aren't sterile.

(But back to the original post...it sounds like if the designer dog is the offspring of two purebred dogs, it is still considered a hybrid)

Edited by author Thu Jul 11, '13 8:49pm PST

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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 12, '13 12:01am PST 
This meaning is often used in plant and animal breeding, where hybrids are commonly produced and selected because they have desirable characteristics not found or inconsistently present in the parent individuals or populations. Wikipedia

This is not the biological term, in biology a dog is a dog.

If you read the definition, it would never be applied to 'designer' dogs as the basis is 'desirable characteristics not found.....'. Basically this terminology was adopted to apply to agricultural uses. Crossing Herefords and Charolais to increase size, crossing strains of wheat to produce greater yield,etc. A Beagle/Pug is a crossbreed, mutt, whatever but it is not a hybrid. It is a poorly thought out idea.
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Noah

Herpaderp-apotam- us
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 12, '13 7:32am PST 
I think a lot of my confusion was around the "sterile offspring" bit when, as others have said, wolfdogs can indeed breed and produce more wolfdogs.

And I'm not one to defend designer dogs at all, but I thought pug/beagle were one of the more sensible ones in theory. It might help level out some of those structural/health problems that pugs have but oh dear god the temperament of those mixes, what a nightmare. Just ends up being more proof that this simplistic "oh, I'll get the best of both breeds" rationale people who breed these dogs have is so flawed.
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Savannah- Blue Belle

A Heart of Gold!
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 12, '13 8:01am PST 
noah, to that...the people up the street have one of these mixes and it is both ugly and a maniac. But Savvy seems to be in love with it.
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Jewel, PCD

8.6lbs of fury- in a bow!
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 12, '13 8:17am PST 
I don't know if I'm helping or hindering but hybrids aren't always sterile. I watched a show on TV a month or so ago about a mule that gave birth, it's rare but apparently that wasn't even the first time.
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Cohen CD RE- ADC SGDC- FDCh CGN

The Monster
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 12, '13 8:33am PST 
And I'm not one to defend designer dogs at all, but I thought pug/beagle were one of the more sensible ones in theory. It might help level out some of those structural/health problems that pugs have but oh dear god the temperament of those mixes, what a nightmare. Just ends up being more proof that this simplistic "oh, I'll get the best of both breeds" rationale people who breed these dogs have is so flawed.

Might help the Pug, but it certainly does not help the Beagle.
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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 12, '13 9:10am PST 
Noah, I just mentioned the first one that came to mind.laugh out loud

Let's see if I can get this right. I think that animals from the same family are capable of naturally producing offspring, but only if they are from the same genus can they produce non-sterile offspring? I'm not sure, high school was a long time ago.
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