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Been looking for a Jindo -- Any big red flags will this dog seller?

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
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Member Since
06/14/2013
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 14, '13 6:45pm PST 
This is their facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Korean-Jindos-Puppies/

I've been looking for a Korean Jindo puppy for months down, looking at both breeders and dog shelters. So far, this Facebook seller has been one of the better options I've found. I'm pretty certain they're not a registered breeder (possibly a BYB) but they do offer the following:

- Vaccinations (series of DHLPP & Bordetella) and if the pups are old enough, rabies; they will provide full vaccination history
- Deworming
- Health certification from vet
- Health guarantee
- Flea preventive started
- Contracts

She says she used to be a vet technician and has been breeding Jindos for 8 years (doesn't breed any other breed). She posts a lot of photos and all the dogs look happy, healthy, and space to run around. We've been talking back and forth and I guess what really throws me off is her poor typing skills (haha) - lots of grammar and spelling mistakes, and it does seem she does seem like a prolific breeder (litters are maybe a month apart in availability?). However, it does seem she has about 3-4 pairs of dogs she's getting litters from.

I'm not looking for a show dog, just a Jindo that will live a long and healthy life. I will check her references but is anyone seeing big red flags that I'm not? Yay or nay?
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Member Since
06/14/2013
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 14, '13 9:56pm PST 
Sorry -- I realized the link doesn't work. Here is the correct link: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Korean-Jindos-Puppies/212194775512809 ?fref=ts

Any insight will be greatly appreciated!
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MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 14, '13 10:12pm PST 
I'm not the best person to answer this since I am not a breeder but even I see some things that concern me.

1.) Jindo's are not a breed for just anyone how carefully is she screening potential homes for her puppies? Preparing potential puppy owners for the good bad and ugly of the breed and making sure that they are well informed and going to be a good home for the puppies she produces?

2.) I don't see any mention of genetic testing of the parents for conditions common to the breed has any been done?

3.) Even with 4 females to have litters that often she would have to be breeding each female during every heat cycle, not in the best interest of the dogs.
4.) I see no mention of temperament testing or breeding for stable temperament.

I'm sure that others will see more than I did but I can tell you we bought our male Akita Kai from someone although not established in the world of Akitas was doing the temperament and genetic testing on all of her breeding stock. Screened potential owners of her puppies more like adoptive parents of a child including a home visit and lengthy application process. Made absolutely sure we knew what we were getting into with owning an Akita and all that can go wrong if they are not properly trained and socialized from day one. She also had 4 breeding females and only produced about 3 possibly 4 litters a year so there is often a waiting list for puppies. She makes absolutely certain that her puppies are going to homes capable and willing to do what is best for that puppy and tries to match puppies to potential owners by the needs of the owner and personality of the puppy so rather than paying and picking your puppy, you pay and she matches you with what she feels will be the best puppy to fit your situation and needs. Hopefully others will chime in and give you their take as well. Good Luck.
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Member Since
06/14/2013
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 14, '13 11:10pm PST 
Thank you for your response! It was really helpful.

I realize my phrasing was misleading. I didn't mean she had new litters every other month. I meant usually after her current litter has weaned and ready to leave their mother, she'll have a new litter a month later. I guess she'd then have about 4 litters a year.

However, you're right in that she doesn't mention anything about genetic or temperamental testing. Of course, I don't need a purebred Jindo as long as he'll have a long healthy life. But I understand the genetic testing would be important in terms of dangerous defects.

I really like how the breeder matched you with the puppy instead of you picking the puppy. That's incredibly smart. I wish it was easier to find a Jindo breeder in Los Angeles. It's been crazy difficult; the only ones I've been able to find are out of state (this Facebook one is located in Virginia). @_@
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Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 15, '13 6:47am PST 
Jin-Sohl Jindo Dog Rescue in SoCal.

Kwest Kennels, this lady breeds Malamutes, but owns and show Jindos and is in SoCal as well. Might be worth your time to email her and ask about where she got her dogs from.

Genetic testing is more than just proving your dog is a purebred... it doesn't even do that. Its about making sure your dog is structurally and genetically sound. I don't know what specific issues plague Jindos, but ALL purebred dogs have defects of one sort or another, and a reputable breeder should at least be aware of them and understand what to look for and what to guarantee against.

Temperament testing is another big one. Jindos are a "primitive" breed, not quite like your average companion breeds and when bred without care its temperament can slip and slide in directions you DON'T want it going. You need to get puppies from sound stock to ensure you are getting a stable pet, so finding a good breeder is EXTREMELY important.
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MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 15, '13 7:02am PST 
We were actually in touch with Kai's breeder for more than 6 months before we got him. That gave the breeder time to get to know us, ask about our lifestyle, our plans for him and also learn from us about Mika's personality and what was going to work best for her. A good breeder can match a puppy pretty well even from a distance if they ask the right questions. I will try to find a post in this forum I think might be of a bit of help as well and then will post it here so you can see what you should be looking for. Also have you looked into a breed club for Jindo's? There just may be a reputable breeder much closer to you selling good quality puppies. The genetic testing is important for conditions like hip dysplasia which can be very painful for the puppy and very expensive to treat as well as eye problems that may cause blindness and other potentially serious health issues, temperament testing and breeding for stable temperament is important so that you can be a bit more certain that with proper upbringing your puppy will not suddenly become aggressive and possibly hurt you or someone else. Jindo's like Akitas are not a breed you get into just because you like the way they look and you need to be well prepared for the things that can go wrong and the best ways to help prevent that. They like Akitas are a large powerful breed capable of considerable damage should they become aggressive. Please make sure you know what you are getting before you get it. We were very lucky we got in touch with our breeder through our vet. Also, please no matter how desperate you are stay away from pet store puppies. Good Luck.
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MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 15, '13 7:08am PST 
the thread is called, "Picking the right puppy." it is on the 3rd page in about the 17th topic down. there is some good advice from some very experienced people that might be of help. Again, Good Luck.
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Member Since
06/14/2013
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 15, '13 3:42pm PST 
Thanks for showing me that thread, Mika! It was incredibly informative. I believe I'm ready to handle a Jindo. I've had a dog for 17 years, did a lot of volunteer work at a humane society (so I handled a lot of powerful dogs), and dogsit as well. I've done extensive research for the breed as well to make sure it was the breed for me and could fit into my lifestyle. The reason I'm asking the questions I am is because I've never bought a dog before (my previous dog was a stray pup that ran into our home; after 17 healthy years, he sadly passed a few weeks back).

Aggressive temperament and genetic defects are definitely a concern. However, just to play devil's advocate, how would it be that much different if I were to adopt from a shelter/rescue? Of course, adoption is my ideal choice but it occurred to me, if I were to adopt a puppy (not an older dog whose behavior, etc. can be tested), wouldn't I be running similar risks? For instance, adopting from a shelter wouldn't guarantee that the puppy is genetically sound either -- right?

Thanks for all your help in this so far. It's been really helping me understand this entire process!
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Sam

I eat- EVERYTHING!
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 15, '13 4:08pm PST 
Yes, but the dog from the pound will cost you $30, while the dog bred by the breeder may run close to $1000. I don't know about you, but if I'm paying $1000 for a pup, I want to be sure that both health and temperament wise that I know exactly what I'm getting.

With Sam, the breeder had screened for problems found in the breed and purposely picked the parents she did because they would not yield a dog with that specific defect. I met all of her dogs and the temperament was exactly what the breed standard called for. With a BYB or a shelter dog, both of those are a coin flip since you don't know the parantage well enough.
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Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 15, '13 4:23pm PST 
Personally, I'm not wild over picking up young puppies from rescue. If I had my personal pick, I would always go with a slightly older dog, at least 2-3 years, so the temperament is already known.

But if you must go with a rescue puppy, then no, there is no real way of knowing how good or bad its temperament will be. I guess the only difference vs. a BYB is you're saving a life as apposed to paying the person that is likely producing these very puppies that are ending up in the shelters to begin with.

I would look into the two links posted earlier. I think they are good leads for you.
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