GO!

Tell me about Golden Retrievers

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  
Kashmir- ♥ CGC

Boxer Beach Bum
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 8:50am PST 
I have fallen in love with this breed working with them at work. They seem like a great breed to have as a pet and do sports with. What else is there about them i should know?
[notify]
"Selli"

The Muddy- Princess
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 9:20am PST 
Other than that they are the bestest breed everwink

Like any other breed, if you are planning on getting a Golden from a breeder, DO YOUR RESEARCH. If you are in the US go to the GRCA.org website and read about how to find a reputable breeders, any pedigree needs to have several generations of the major four health clearances, hip, elbow, eye and heart and you need to verify those clearances either through seeing hard copies of them seeing them listed on the OFA website. DO NOT get suckered in by a fancy website, also watch out for people hyping "Cream," "Creme," or "White" Goldens as being healthier or calmer than "American" Goldens. I don't know where you live, but the cost of a well bred Golden from a reputable breeder will be anywhere from $900 (midwest) to about $2000 (coasts).

Very generally there are two main "lines" of reputable Goldens, Field Goldens and Show Goldens. Dogs bred for field work generally have more energy than an average home can deal with, but all Goldens have A LOT of energy and need a couple hours of off-leash fun a day.

In General Goldens are very trainable and love the process, they are the top obedience dogs in the US and are also very competitive in agility, tracking and other performance events. They are softer (more sensitive) than Labs. If they get the required amount of positive interactions with their humans (i.e. training), they are calm, but if they don't have that interaction they may become hyper and out of control.

They are VERY mouthy as pups, they are known as "landsharks" meaning they will be chewing on you for several months. The most common complaint of new Golden people is that their pups are aggressive because they are constantly trying to jump and bite them. This is what baby Goldens do, it is not aggression, just the baby trying to get that positive interaction.

My final thought is that Goldens seem to have a desire to be "Good." They want their humans to be happy with them.
[notify]
Ginger DSA- ThD TT CGC - &hearts

My Angel
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 9:27am PST 
-Most Goldens shed a lot. I say most because Ginger actually didn't shed as much as some, she had more of a "field" Golden type coat without tons of undercoat but apparently most shed a lot more than her.

-They need a lot of attention and can be "velcro" dogs, love to be with their people 24/7.

-They can be very mouthy.

-I don't know if this is true of all Goldens but mine was bird crazy. She was well trained but it could be hard to keep her focus around ducks and geese.

-Some Goldens will want to retrieve/play fetch all day and will keep bringing a ball constantly if you let them. Mine was not like this unless we were at the beach, if there was a body of water around she was adamanent about retrieving something but the rest of the time she enjoyed it but was not crazy about it.

-Many Goldens love people in general, don't expect a dog that will ignore strangers (although of course you can teach appropriate greeting and attention and all that).

-They also attract people so if you don't like strangers approaching to talk about/to your dog, ask to pet your dog, ask questions, talk about your dog, tell you about all the Goldens they've known, etc...

Edited by author Mon Nov 12, '12 9:31am PST

[notify]

Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 9:36am PST 
Well, they are by far my favorite breed, BOL laugh out loud

What do you want to know in particular? There is very definite split in them between bench (show) and field. Bench are much bigger-boned and have much more coat. They are clever and trainable, just as the field are (I am biased toward the fieldies), have much less drive, and are still good for OB. Their temperaments must be carefully taken into consideration.

My faves, the field Goldens, often come in a redder coat, but not always. They are more gracile, with a less fluffy coat, lighter boned, intelligent, biddable, very trainable, and VERY drivy.

Of course, within both groups, there are more subdued Goldens, more "pet quality" and more mellow.

There is now an offshoot group know as "versatile" Goldens. These are Goldens that can do EVERYTHING. They especially excel at dog sports. If you are looking at agility, this is the dog to look for. I am looking to buy either a field or versatile pup in a few years. I already have his name picked out, as well as possible lines. I have picked out a few good, ethical breeders. You should learn the lines and be extremely picky and knowledgeable about the health issues, of which there are quite a few. Good breeders have them listed in the pedigree database, and you can also look for long lived lines.

Goldens are lovable. They are dog social and people social. They are fantastic dogs for taking everywhere -- to outdoor restaurants, in the car, on vacation, to farmer's markets and arts/crafts shows, etc. Of course they should have proper socialization.

Goldens give you unconditional love. They aren't sharp at all. They require good hard exercise, so they can be a walking dog, a jogging or running or bicycle partner, a swimming dog, etc. They do not require the level of exercise of a GSP however! I have had Goldens in a hot climate and a cold climate. I have had Goldens in a small apt., a small city apt with no fenced yard, and a rural setting. All worked well. I have found them to be neither overly clingy nor inclined to fat, both common complaints. May be due to the fact that I have always have the field type, I don't know. They require few repetitions in training, and live to please and for praise.

I highly suggest joining the Golden Retriever Forum.

What else would you like to know?

Selli has tons of info.

I am on my 3rd btw, I will never be with out them. I also have a Duck Toller/Golden mix.
[notify]
Dr. Watson

Not a wiener- dawg!
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 9:44am PST 
I have found the mouthiness to be controllable through negative punishment /ignoring. Also teaching a good drop it and leave it by 5 months. They do have a very soft mouth. They love ball and stick retrieving as was said. The field types do shed less, and the fur does fall to the ground, rather than floating every where as some heavily shedding short haired dogs do. smile
[notify]
Thor CGC

God of Thunder
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 11:27am PST 
I am considering a Golden for my next Service Dog.

I am wondering, what lines are larger? I am going to need a dog that is at least 80 lbs, and I don't know if any well bred Goldens even get that large cry
[notify]
Kashmir- ♥ CGC

Boxer Beach Bum
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 12:21pm PST 
Thanks everyone for the great info. wave I guess i was just interested in the breed in general and how versatile they can be? I really want my next dog to be able to do everything. I want a swimming companion, agility star, obedience and dog that can play. I do love my Boxers dont get me wrong but they can be bullheaded and stubborn lol. I want a dog that i can take places and have fun with and do fun things with cheer. At work all the goldens want to be glued to you and really want to be with you.
[notify]
"Selli"

The Muddy- Princess
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 1:33pm PST 
For the most part show line Goldens are larger. According to the AKC standard, males should be between 22" and 24" between 65-75 Lbs. In the ring they are allowed to be up to 1" above standard and if you raise the weight accordingly it would be 80lbs. Don't be taken by breeders who breed for a dog bigger than the standard, the health (and life expectancy fall) are jeopardized accordingly.

And don't worry about show line dogs not being up to the task. As Watson said, there are plenty of dogs from show lines who excel at obedience and other thinking tasks. For example, Yogi, who won the National in breed was also an obedience and agility champion
[notify]
Ginger DSA- ThD TT CGC - &hearts

My Angel
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 2:02pm PST 
Kashmir they are definitely very versatile and can do almost everything! Check out Ginger's Dogster photobook for some examples. We never really stuck to one sport long enough to get a lot of titles or anything but she enjoyed and did well in training in obedience, agility, animal-assisted therapy, carting, lure coursing, freestyle, rally, flyball, etc... She enjoyed dock diving as well (once I actually got her to try it) and we were working on prepping for the WETT Water Rescue test although we never actually got to do it. She even got a Dog Scout badge in weight pull, and did well at "above ground" Go-to-Ground.
She also enjoyed going hiking/backpacking with me and running, with me on my bike/rollerblades.
However she was a laid back/calm type Golden who could be just as happy relaxing in the house and not the type who needed tons of activity/exercise to keep busy or not be a nuisance/get in trouble, if I wanted to lay around the house all day she was happy but she was also ready to do whatever activity I wanted to do that day.

Edited by author Mon Nov 12, '12 2:03pm PST

[notify]
Lance- (1995-2009)

Faithful- Guardian
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 12, '12 2:28pm PST 
I've had two and they are definitely people dogs. Very sweet, very eager to please, and always want to be with you. My first didn't care for retrieving or water, but he was also pretty poorly bred. The second one is from much better breeding and she lives for her fetch toy. That dog will retrieve a Kong all day if you're willing to throw it that long laugh out loud It has to be taken away when play time is over because she'll drop it at your feet incessantly. She's also a water lover, which is fun and great exercise.
[notify]
  (Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2