GO!

What do you recommend?

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
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Mister- Jagger

YIP YAP I love- Rock and Roll!
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 2, '12 6:44pm PST 
Hi everyone!
I have started researching my next dog breed. That in itself is fun! BOL What do you recommend? Here are my criteria:
- I'm looking for a purebred and a puppy. I want to know roughly what to expect and this is why I'm choosing purebred over mixed breed this time. Yes, I understand that every dog is an individual, which is one of the reasons why I want a puppy.
- I'm not too too picky on size, but I would prefer something in the range of 25 lbs to 50 lbs. If the breed fits everything else, I could handle bigger.
- I don't want anything that requires lots of professional grooming.
- I will only buy from a reputable breeder. I live in Eastern Canada, so rare breeds are even more rare here! I am not interested in paying 2000$+ for a dog that will be a pet (besides DH won't allow that!). I don't need a dog from Championship lines.

Traits:
- eager to learn or work, i.e. not stubborn
- preferably fairly easy to train basic behaviours, but I have a reasonable amount of experience in training so it doesn't have to be a genius dog!
- not necessary to have a performance dog
- happy go lucky, friendly with mostly everyone (puppy be thoroughly socialized to help with this)
- not looking for an independant type
- likes to be around me, but I don't want a one-person dog
- no need for a protective dog
- friendly with other dogs and animals; we will have sheep next year
- able to train to be off-leash (i.e. no sighthounds)
- exercice needs; I can accomodate a reasonable amount of exercice needs, 1 hour a day max, but I know I can't handle a border collie or a husky.

I think that's it... thinking

So Dogsters, what do you think?
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Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 2, '12 7:07pm PST 
Sheltie?

I think they pretty well fit your criteria. Could also consider something like a nice bench bred Cocker.
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Elsa

mycooldog.wordpr- ess.com
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 3, '12 5:22am PST 
How about a Brittany? They need a lot of exercise but not as much as a Border Collie. If you are getting sheep though you may want to consider a herding breed- I think a Corgi or a Smooth Collie would each suit you very well.
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Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 3, '12 6:42am PST 
Well, if you're not into grooming, a sheltie isn't for you. ;-) Both corgi breeds also shed ALOT (think buckets of hair). Plus, most corgis and shelties will need more then an hour or so of exercise a day, unless you're going to do training PLUS exercise.

Shelties aren't a good breed to start with if you're thinking of getting into herding. Most just don't have instinct. Same with Pembroke corgis. Cardigan corgis are much more reliable on sheep out of the three.

I'd honestly push you to a smooth collie. Short hair, sweet temperament. Plus, some people still use them to herd.

If you're just looking for a sweet pet and you don't care about championship lines or titles or anything, and you don't care about size, why not just rescue again?

I've always felt that purebreds were for people who had very specific wants and needs- example- you need a low shedding dog, so you get a poodle. Or, you want to do performance, so you get a high octane herder.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not necessarily trying to talk you out of getting a dog from a breeder, but if you're not willing to pay for a purebred dog from decent lines, then why not just adopt?

While I'm a fervent supporter of great breeders (as in my dogs will always come from breeders, I'm just not a good person for rescue work) I really hate to see people buying purebred puppies from mediocher breeders, who seem to give all other breeders a bad name when they don't health test and sell pups at "discount" prices.

In other words, if you're going to do something, do it right. smile

Edited by author Wed Oct 3, '12 6:49am PST

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Angel Lou

Everybody wants- to be a...DOG!- not a CAT
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 3, '12 6:46am PST 
I too think that a nice spaniel would suit you quite well. I think an English Cocker Spaniel would be the best match. They are not quite as high strung as the American version so I have seen. Trainable, friendly, and mellow disposition. I really think that it is a breed you should look in to.
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Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 3, '12 7:23am PST 
Just re read your post...typically herding dogs aren't goofy, outgoing, or friendly to strangers. They may tolerate strangers and dogs they don't know, but they probably won't seek affection from people outside the family.

Same with strange animals- lots of herders see other dogs, and even kids, as animals to herd.

Even puppies who are well socialized and friendly as young ones will probably grow more reserved as they become adults.

I think the poster who suggested a spaniel is probably right. I think they're more of what personality you're looking for.

Edited by author Wed Oct 3, '12 7:26am PST

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Bunny

Black dogs rock!
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 3, '12 8:20am PST 
wave neighbour

I may be a little off here, but my first thought was a Lab. Not sure of the exercise thoughthinking I think I do know a reputable breeder right here, not sure he is still breeding though. If you want a dog who can double as a working dog, the Collie suggestions are good. Whatever you decide, let me know, I am very good at researching breeders and have a pretty good idea of the general areawink Depending on what you decide on, you may have to travel a bit. The Spoodle breeder I am leaning towards is in Montrealsmile

An all around farm dog you may want to consider is the Bernese, especially since there is a very good breeder about an hour away from youbig grin I know it's bigger than you had in mind but may fit well if you can deal with the potential health issues

Edited by author Wed Oct 3, '12 8:34am PST

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Mister- Jagger

YIP YAP I love- Rock and Roll!
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 3, '12 8:48am PST 
Thanks everyone! Oh, and Hi Bunny! wave

- Regarding why I don't adopt again: I prefer a purebred over a rescue this time because I want to know more or less what I'm getting into, size, temperament, coat, health, etc. I don't want to deal with a dog's past issues as we are doing with Jagger and Layla. I love rescuing, but this time I'd rather a purebred.

- It's possible to get a purebred from a reputable breeder for less than $2000 (at least it is around here), depending on the breed.

- I am not necessarily planning on doing herding with this dog; I just need the dog to be fairly safe or at least trainable around sheep & chickens. We are only planning on having 2 or 3 sheep for now.

- I am not a big fan of the look of a cocker spaniel... Just my opinion!

- Brittany: I put it on my "to research list". Thanks Elsa! Same for smooth collie, sheltie & lab

- Cookie: Love the Bernese, but the fur just scares me! BOL! But I will definitely put it on my "to research list"
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Bunny

Black dogs rock!
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 3, '12 9:22am PST 
I think you meant Bunny, not Cookie wink

In any case, I pmailed you a linksmile
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Elsa

mycooldog.wordpr- ess.com
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 3, '12 1:47pm PST 
A good lower maintenance alternative to the Bernie is the Swissie!
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