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Hunting Companion: GSP vs. Weimaraner

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
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Elsa

mycooldog.wordpr- ess.com
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 10:51am PST 
We are looking for a dog to add to our pack as a hunting partner and companion to us(a young couple) and Elsa our Cavalier. We have been leaning toward GSP these past few weeks and have been researching breeders but we are starting to fall in love with Weimaraners after watching a pair of them work recently. They are so quiet and graceful! Yet one of the things we are so drawn to in the GSP is how hardy and robust they can be. Has anyone lived with or hunted with both of these dogs that can give us a solid comparison? Thanks!
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 12:10pm PST 
Speaking generally of course...

Weimaraners are stoic work horses who take their jobs and life EXTREMELY seriously. They are not weekend warriors. If not worked 7 days a week - hard - they are prone to becoming fractious, destructive, anxiety ridden and even aggressive. When I say worked I do not mean a walk or even jog around the block a few times. They need wide open spaces to gallop and sniff. Although I found my Weim and the Weims I've hunted behind funny in ways I'm pretty sure there is nothing funny about life to them. They need owners who are committed to giving them what they need to be happy, and it's quite a commitment to undertake, much more so than with other breeds.

GSD's, again speaking generally, are stoic work horses out in the field (as all pointers are) but there is much more wiggle room temperament wise. They don't need *as much* time, energy or space to keep happy (read, of course all bird dogs need a substantial amount of all but this is just relayed for comparisons sake). They tend to be more relaxed (as relaxed as a pointer can be) and some lines I'd dare say can let their hair down to the point of being downright goofy.


I will caution, there is a big difference between hunting behind a certain breed of dog and owning one. My favorite waterfowl dog to hunt behind is a Chessie - hands down, they trip my trigger like none other in a blind - but I'll never own one. I can enjoy the talent and send them home because in the end I don't enjoy their overall demeanor. Same thing with Weim's. I've heard of far too many people work behind one, go WOAH! I WANT ONE!!! only to find out the two were soooooo never ever going to be compatible living together 24/7/365. Most people find them far faaaaaaaar too intense.


It all depends on what you're after.
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Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 12:24pm PST 
I just read in your other thread that you are not a fan of neurotic dogs.

You like clingy but not overly clingy.

You are worried about a smooth coat Vizsla being both.



Weimaraner = neurotic and overly clingy, think of a Vizsla on drugs.

GSD = pretty clingy but not overly so, and if given enough of an outlet they are usually very stable minded.

While Vizslas and GSP's are pretty comparable (with Vizslas being only slightly edgier IMHO), Weim's are to the Pointing breeds what Chessies are to the Retriever breeds. If you wouldn't much care for the intensity of a Chessie you will not much care for the intensity of a Weim. Same ball of wax.

Edited by author Fri Sep 28, '12 12:28pm PST

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Elsa

mycooldog.wordpr- ess.com
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 1:21pm PST 
Haha a Vizsla on drugs! Thanks a lot Trigger that was really helpful. Same as you I can't watch a Chessie without my jaw dropping but the more research I do the more I realize I'll probably never be able to own one.
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Elsa

mycooldog.wordpr- ess.com
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 1:24pm PST 
I should add that we don't hunt big game, mostly just upland game if that makes a difference.
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Niki

1229379
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 1:48pm PST 
In my experience GSPs have a TON of energy. I would actually choose a Weim over a GSP for myself if I was deciding between the breeds.

I used to be a dog walker to a young GSP male and quickly realized these are working dogs that aren't for the average owner with a regular sized backyard and work schedule. Not saying that a Weimaraner isn't very active either .... but I simply prefer their overall personality. Older GSPs are sweethearts, but if you want a young dog - watch out! Landsharks are a good way to describe them wink

Either way, if you do get a puppy go through a responsible, reputable breeder. Not something off Craigslist or a newspaper. Meeting with a breeder, dogs, and other owners will give you a better idea of what you want and can handle.
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Buster

1201864
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 1:50pm PST 
I've not met many weimaraners with good temperments they have a reputation as quite neurotic and for aggression here. I'm not sure how much of that is down to people getting them because they're just so beautiful and not realising that it's a big dog that really needs to be worked to be happy though.
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Pippin - My Forever- Angel

Secret agent in- charge of- Squirrels
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 28, '12 2:06pm PST 
Having had a GSP for almost 12 yrs., and having met a few Weims., I would say that personality-wise I prefer GSPs. Although I didn't hunt with mine, he was a great dog. Of course both breeds need a LOT of exercise. However, the only "job" Pippin had was coming to the office with me and being our mail delivery boy.laugh out loud GSPs are very people oriented and prone to separation anxiety, so make sure you can spend plenty of time with them. Not a good dog to leave alone for long periods. Don't know if this is an issue for you, but they are also very gentle and tolerant around children.
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Elsa

mycooldog.wordpr- ess.com
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 29, '12 7:40am PST 
I know I can handle either breed that's not really the question. What I want to know is if either is more or less adept at being BOTH an excellent upland game hunter and a family companion.
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Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 29, '12 8:49am PST 
This coming from someone with no personal experience owning either, but if my primary goal was nice all-around family companion + hunting, I would pick the GSP.

GSP is a multi-function gun dog, a little bit of a jack of all trades. I think because of that, he is a more adaptable dog in general, and can function easier in an environment that maybe isn't custom tailored to his exact lifestyle preferences.

Weims fall into that oft-mentioned category of mine, of dogs that just shouldn't be owned unless its your absolute passion to own one. Too fragile as a breed, too easy to make mistakes. Where as with the GSP, I think that's a fine enough dog to get your feet wet with (not that I'm implying you're a novice, but in general).
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