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Dogue De Bordeaux

If you are wondering what is the right dog for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about tail wagging and learning.

  
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ARCHMX Asher RL1X RL2X RL3X RL

we will dance in- the ring without- words
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 10, '12 8:40am PST 
I really love them. They are not hard to train and if well socialized, wonderful with people. But they are freakin' strong. If they decide they are going left and you want to go right, guess who wins? You have to get them on board early.

But I love that in spite of their size, they can be real cuddle bugs.
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y

dog-sitter in- charge.
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 10, '12 12:28pm PST 
DDBs if i recall have a really dismal life span, unfortunately.... frown
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Sonja

It's all about- me.
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 10, '12 9:17pm PST 
I believe you are correct Lilith...most ginormous dogs have short life spans. I call them "heart-break breeds."
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Taggert

Semper Vorax
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 10, '12 10:26pm PST 
I've only ever met a puppy DDB. Her name was peanut and she was in our socialization hour while I was going. She was a very quiet puppy. She took a whole month of sticking by her mum and watching the other dogs before she would cautiously join in. Even then it wasn't rambunctious play. It was serious. I wish I could see how she turned out.
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Buster

1201864
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 11, '12 4:31am PST 
I think the only giant breed I've heard of with a decent lifespan is the leonberger frown it's a real shame. I think ddbs are something like 10 years.
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y

dog-sitter in- charge.
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 11, '12 7:29am PST 
Well, by that I meant even shorter than other large breeds. I think statistics on their life span by real poll and not anecdote by the breed club was something like 6 years, the most frequent cause of death being cancer. Albeit with limited sample size.

Their longevity program starts marking dogs as they reach only EIGHT years of age..
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Jasper

Whut?
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 11, '12 3:36pm PST 
A friend of mine who has Irish Wolfhounds hasn't had one live past 7 years.
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Missy

Miss- Pig!
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 11, '12 4:07pm PST 
They seem to be shorter lived across the pond. Here the average lifespan is between 8-10 years old. I remember one discussion on here years ago and a member already in Mastiff's, who really liked the DDB, said they couldn't ever own one because their average lifespan is only 5 years, which is very alarming and sad!
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y

dog-sitter in- charge.
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 11, '12 4:34pm PST 
Missy, I think you're probably right. For many breeders in the US, genetic diversity is not very important at all and in many breeds it's 'fashionable' to breed closely or breed 'popularly' - I mean not simply for backyard breeders but established, long-term breeders. I really think this type of mentality often leads to unseen consequences like short life spans and weakened immune systems, ones that can't be measured by health testing.

Since we becoming more involved in purebred dogs, I'm personally greatly disturbed by the totally casual way many established breeders are breeding animals which common sense tells you not to - like breeding bitches who have had previous malformed litters, aborted litters, stud dogs who have no idea what they're doing/lacking libido, indiscriminate use of AI, breeding half sister to brother, etc. From my point of view these things just slowly and surely erode the health of dogs & breeds over generations. Technology does not trump nature, or whatever there is left of nature in the domesticated dog. Setting 'type' quickly using close linebreeding while destroying what's left of a closed stud book is not in the best interest for the futurity of a breed.

Being heavily involved in international clubs, it appears at least in some breeds and KCs (and evident by the UK KC's effort to introduce a 3-gen COI calculator) these things are making headway and many more breeders elsewhere attempt to understand true, total health and what really makes healthy breeding. Some KCs exclude or limit the types of linebreedings that can be registered. Some KCs require breedings to be OK'd by the breed club under some scheme. The breeding of purebred dogs needs to be taken with the understanding of not only producing dogs who are function-fit, but also with genetic preservation in mind - something like breeding rare animals with a limited population. And at least the clubs in the US are just not properly equipped to monitor the breedings in order to preserve the genetic material.. pretty much every breeder for themselves is the impression I get.

That being said, recently at some venues we had the good fortune of meeting a lady with Great Danes - ones bred with genetic diversity as a key consideration - not only over the perfunctory 3 generations but over 6 generations and more..and seeing her dogs, some of which were 11 years old still spry, gives me some glimmer of hope that there are actually still some people left who truly understand biology & genetics, who are working with dogs. After all, we simply trust the complicated matter of procreation & natural selection in the natural world, to basically lay people who find it a hobby, in dogs.......

/steps of soap box.. dog
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Buster

1201864
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 11, '12 4:38pm PST 
Here the KC won't register parent/child or full siblings matings yet will register puppies with the same COI or higher. I think they will register these mating under exceptional circumstances like they will register litters from bitches over 8 years old. The inbreeding calculator is horribly flawed as well, I don't think it takes into account imported dog's pedigrees, but it's a big step in the right direction.

I know a DDB breeder who was happy they were put on the high profile list for health checks for the best of breed etc because there are a lot of the breed that fear them going the way of the english or neapolitan mastiff, too heavy, too wrinkled and this is way of helping control it.

Edited by author Tue Sep 11, '12 4:40pm PST

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  (Page 2 of 2: Viewing entries 11 to 20)  
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