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inbetween dogs right now,would a blue heeler be good choice?

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Member Since
09/12/2010
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 13, '10 1:47pm PST 
sadly i had to put my 16 1/2 year old husky to sleep september 10th,her arthuritis,hips and nerves were just terrible,got her for high school graduation in 1994.she was a bit difficult to housebreak but she picked up on it,and everything else,loved to play,she was pretty energenic and listened well.

now that i am searching for another companion.pet i am taking time to consider all avenues.i read that heelers are intillegent and faily easy to train,loyal and freindly but might need crate time if nobody home,i do got a large fenced in back yard with a 6 foot fence so plenty of room to roam if not home,i work 8 hours a day m-f,is that too much time away?

i also read that theyre heel nippers,well its in their blood,but that should be trainable?my husky when i'd walk her would grab my pantleg and try to drag me foward faster,or the leash.that actually amused me so i should be able to handle that.

i got no kids,maybe a few little cousins might stop by from time to time.but we got a cat,how do these heelers get along with cats if theyre just pups?we had to keep my husky downstairs with me and the cat upstair as she would chase him.3 years ago we had to put the cat to sleep due to kidney failure but got another kitten.my husky still tried to chase her but only half heartedly as she was getting older at that point.

so at this point i been searching for blue heeler and husky breeders,most i found for the heelers are 4 hours or more away and i would really like to see the facilities they are raised in as we got out husky in a town only 30 minutes away,the breeder no longer are in buisness as they are either in their 80's or deceased.

so anbody know of any repetable blue heeler breeders?

would a blue heeler be right for me?
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holly

THROW THAT- BALL!!!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 15, '10 11:58am PST 
hm, I am always reluctant to answer this question but here goes. Our girls are only home one day a week for 8 hours and we can sure tell the difference at the end of the day with our youngest one. Kai is 10 mos old and is still crated when we are not home and she is like a tazmanian devil when we let her out after that time. Yes ACD's are trainable but that comes with almost always an incredibly high drive. They are really not good 'afternoon companions' unless that entire afternoon every single day is devoted to their every whim. They are velcro dogs that not just want but need you to be with them. They are not independent dogs. They were bred to work in conjunction with their handlers. They want to be with you....attached by an unseen invisible cord...to make sure you don't need them for anything. They are driven and need a job all the time. They will make up their own job if you don't give them one and you usually wont like the one they make up. They are smarter than you are smart enough to give them credit for no matter how smart you think you know they arewink. They are a whole different ball of dog than a husky for sure. Not nearly as independent, and much more intense is my experience. As far as the cats go....if raised with them they can be ok but don't count on them being ok with a strange cat even if they love 'their' cat completely. The 'nipping' you heard about with an ACD is much more directed than a husky urging you to go faster for them. It is something you really have to address with them in training as soon as they are walking. I would say if you are up for 2 hours 7 days a week of getting in some intense excercise for them and daily training to keep their mind busy and are willing to look into doggy day care while you are at work you can still consider the breed with those caveats in mind. Also dog agility classes are almost a given with them to burn off some of that drive.
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Member Since
09/12/2010
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 16, '10 5:24pm PST 
ah thanks,that still dont detur me,it will be faster pace but fun,it be hard for me to get another husky,would remind me too much of natasha too much.i'm up for the challenge as i got plenty of evening time to devote and train plus all weekends open.

i'm still looking,got an inquire into on breeder in illinois.just need to do some research on the breededs i contact which seems to be a bid of a difficult search.
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holly

THROW THAT- BALL!!!!
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 17, '10 8:56am PST 
Lol they do have a certain draw to them. I have to warn you though that there are plenty of ACD's in animal shelters because someone didn't take seriously the challenge. I am the first to crow from the rooftops how great my dogs are but I am also the first to say that most people really shouldn't own them. Be prepared to invest in many many tough toys for chewing, fetching and brain work. The toys that make them work for their food like a tug-a-jug are almost neccessary for a non-working ACD. Obedience training is really imperative also. They need to be learning and accomplishing things all the time. They find trouble like a magnet and are tenacious in their search for it if bored. We watch Kai pretty diligently and as much as our older dog tries to keep her out of trouble we have 4 silverdollar size holes in our carpet that she chewed when she was bored and we did not engage her for a few minutes. Our older one is much more easy going but we aquired her at a year after she was with a family that thought she was too 'wild'. A very common problem as I said. She came to us with a tendency to cower with the slightest harsh word or if you pick up a dish towel or a broom so I suspect her previous owners thought they could 'discipline' her energy out of her. She is such an awesome dog but I wish so much her 1st owners would have never brought her home. Like I said before, think seriously about doggy day care or a mid day dog walker because an ACD left alone all day in a crate is bad because they are just storing up all that energy that needs a release and if they are left in the back yard alone you may come home to a tunnel to china and 1/2 a house left. If you are committed to an ACD though and you realize that you are going to have to accomodate them and their personality into your home and life and not expect them to fit into yours then you will enjoy them immensly. Good luck with whatever you choose
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Maudie

1101325
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 30, '10 6:51pm PST 
If you still want a heeler, I'd suggest looking at shelters and rescues. Because they are a challenging breed, there tend to be many people who find they can't handle them. We rescued ours from a shelter when she was 8 weeks old. She was a HANDFUL for the first 9 months but now she's settled in to being a great dog. But, again, if you can't keep them busy and stimulated, they get very frustrated. Good luck!
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Mad Maxine

1156685
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 1, '10 6:03pm PST 
ah,thought i posted a response.i ended up getting a 10 week old pup,AKC and all.oh yes she is definatly a handfull but she is still a great pup.just trying to housetrain her and keep her from biting but she is already starting to comprehend sit and down.

as for shelters,i missed a 1 1/2 year old that was taken to it because owner had fallen ill and could no longer take care of her.i seen her on internet the weekend after i put my husky to sleep,wasnt ready yet and seen she was still on following weekend,called sunday,planned on going down the next day,got the call an hour later,she was adopted.

so i looked a good bit on internet and found a breeder i was comfortable with and drove last saturday 376 miles,15 hours round trip to pick her up.named her mad maxine.so far she's living up to the mad part.

thanks for all the first hand info.

BTW.my husky was just as bad as her when she was a pup,maxine just has a bit more energy.shhhh,she's sleeping right now.:p
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kai

why are they not- all bowing?
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 4, '10 5:53am PST 
She is a cutie! The energy part is there till they are about 8 years old then they slow down to a normal dog level. It is good you are starting the training already, very short sessions throughout the day make it fun for them and they learn so fast. Lots of toys, and I mean lots. She will probably gravitate toward a certain kind quickly and you will know which to buy in the future but make sure to get some good chewing choices before teething time. Kais favorite teether was her Nylabone. She is a tearer, so though many dissaprove, she gets rope toys to play with we just monitor her (she does not eat them but leaves the remmnants all over the house) some dogs eat as they chew and can become impacted which is a very serious health hazard. My older dog is a tennis ball freak and a squeaker obsessive dog. Kai is a rope lover and she enjoys the frisbee where my other dog couldn't care less about the frisbee. But both are obsessive fetchers. Once you develop a good bond with her you will find the biggest difference between ACD's and Huskys is that they are usually great off leash dogs if you have a good off leash area where you live. They seem to have an invisible leash hooked to you. We have some really great off leash wilderness areas here and my girls love to go and run and run for hours on the weekends so I hike for 2-3 and they get in 4-10 miles running up ahead and off every rabbit trail and then back to me to make sure I am still there. Just make sure you have worked on a good reliable recall before you venture of leash as their prey/herding drive is usually so strong that they don't always return to you if they percieve a 'job' they can participate in. Good luck with the puppy phase be patient and more stubborn than her and you will have a great dog on your hands.
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Mad Maxine

1156685
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 5, '10 1:56pm PST 
yeah,she sticks to me like glue.past 2 days at work i had to keep her in the carrier,large one as my dad is on a 4 day vacation.i hate to do it but have to.shes gone to bathroom in it 2 days in a row but wont go in it at night as i keep it in my bedroom so its probably seperation anxiety.if i have friends in my living room and leave for a few minutes she starts crying.she's great i made a good choice.

you say slow down in about 8 years,my husky slowed down about same,she was very strong and healthy through the years.

maxine has a earthworm fetish,its hard to stop her from munching on them.should i worry as i read it shouldnt be a issue,no chemicals on lawn but the possibility of hookworm is there,my husky never ate worms,but she ate a few rabbits over the years.currently in works to try to seal off fence from rabbits,might buy bottom rails all the way around,its brick lined and has cables at bottom now.

training is amusing.i can get her to sit but lay down is still hit and miss.shake,well all she wants to do is bite fingers.,lol.
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Tanner

It's Mine, all- mine!!!
 
 
Barked: Tue May 17, '11 10:23am PST 
I have a 7 month old female blue heeler. She is a doll!! She is also so energetic that I am exhausted every night. Like you, my husband and I work atleast 8 hours a day. He is able to make sure she potties during the day and gets a little exercise until I can get home. Having a large yard has not much importance to a heeler. They need A TON of ATTENTION from YOU! If you can't devote all of your evening to walking, playing fetch, leash training and behavior training: don't get a heeler. They are not lap dogs and won't sit still even when they are dead tired.
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