GO!

Barking!!!!

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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DaVinci

1301838
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 14, '13 12:44am PST 
This dog barks and barks and barks. I have 4 chiweenies so am no stranger to barking but..... this dog barks more than all 4 combined. I constantly am telling him to stop barking, spraying with spray bottle, and having even smacked him on the snout a few times. Nothing seems to faze him. He is olde english bulldogge btw.
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Koorazh

You can't catch- me!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 14, '13 4:49am PST 
The wisdom on the street is that you teach a dog to bark on command and then you can teach him to be quiet on command. When he is barking, tell him "Speak!" and if he barks give him a treat. Once he learns to start barking when you say "Speak!" you can start working on "Enough!" or "Quiet!". Here's the Humane Society's advice: http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/tips/how_to_stop_barking.h tml.

But having said this, I have never been able to teach Koorazh not to bark and I have tried literally everything. He is not a nonstop barker, but he barks at squirrels, cats, and other dogs. He also has a bark that he does where he lies on his side in the yard and barks, about one bark every fifteen seconds. (Bark! . . . . . . Bark! . . . . .) I'm not sure what that is about; I think he may be trying to start a conversation with the other neighbor dogs. The best I've been able to do is to teach him to come into the house when I call, and if he is barking too much I call him in.
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Arya

Serious Face
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 14, '13 10:02am PST 
I agree with Koorazh, try teaching Speak and then Quiet.

Not barking is one of the more challenging things to train and spraying/smacking his snout will probably not do anything. The problem is the act of barking itself is a reward for the dog. So even though you're getting all angry, the barking is still rewarding for him. And likely he picks up on your frustration as well, and that could be telling him that you agree with him that things are not okay and must be barked at.

You didn't mention what sets him off, but try to figure out what things he barks at and remove as much of the stimulus as possible (i.e. if he barks at strangers outside, cover up the windows so he can't see outside). It'll make teaching Speak and Quiet a little easier when he's less aroused and there's only one thing causing him to bark (for teaching Speak).

The goal is to make being Quiet on command just as rewarding as barking, with lots of treats/praise. This is probably a long term goal, as I think Old English Bulldogs can be a stubborn breed (I'd have to look that up though).
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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 14, '13 10:19am PST 
You will never teach a dog to be social and patient by rough, aggressive handling. They are like children, they learn what they live.
Stop spraying him and smacking him and seek the help of a trainer. He's a puppy. You asked for him and puppies are annoying.
The most effective way to deal with any unwanted behavior is to teach the dog to do it on command. By doing so you automatically create an off switch, you simply need to put a command to it. But training takes time, puppies do not come made to order. Also keep in mind that some dogs are more vocal then others, and breed descriptions are only guidelines. I have 3 GSDs. One is an alarm barker, one hardly barks at all and one likes to chat, with everyone. It is difficult if not impossible to completely stop something that is a personality trait. So it would be in your best interest to find out WHY he is barking. Is it attention seeking, alerting, fear, etc? Since it is a self rewarding behavior, it can be difficult to deal with but I can promise you that the approach you are taking now is not the road to respect and friendship.
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DaVinci

1301838
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 15, '13 12:02am PST 
This dog loves me more than anyone else, not too worried about him not liking me. He seems to bark to alert but also seems to do so to gain attention as well jus never had a dog that barks this much.
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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 15, '13 7:54am PST 
Well, good luck then.
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Augusta,- CGC, RN

Such a Good Dog!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 15, '13 8:24am PST 
Sabi!laugh out loud

Have to agree, the OP didn't really seem to be so much asking for help as just letting us know how much the dog barks . ..

And all the things that can be done in response to barking (that thus far have no effect on the amount of barking.)

But I see on his page it does say the dog was bought to protect the family, so it sounds like he's taking his job seriously. way to go
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Jackson Tan

Lad about town
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 15, '13 9:05am PST 
*Snort* Yeah, real seriously. The dog's a regular lassie. laugh out loud

I didn't become a horrible cynic til I found a forum called Dogster B&T, ye know. Now it's all gone to pot. Oh well. silenced
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Sabi

When the night- closes in I will- be there
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 15, '13 10:45am PST 
Gus and JT shrug I must have misunderstood. I don't know much about dogs protecting people, given mine are all just well-fed lawn ornaments. I guess aversive methods are definitely the way to go judging by the OPs success.


OP, I truly do wish you luck. I would like an update in about 6 months or so.
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Benny

Where did I bury- that bone- again...
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 15, '13 11:18am PST 
DaVinci, keep in mind that there is a difference between loving you more than anything and respecting you as their master. It is important to train your dog to respect and obey you, not just to be affectionate and loving to you. Training is really important to teach pups how you want them the behave. It is also an opportunity to exercise them physically and mentally. A pup with no exercise will have pent up energy that he will expend in often undesirable ways like barking all the time dog
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