GO!

Essay From the New York Times

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Twister

forever loved
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 10, '13 10:14am PST 
Tiller, if you look at it that way, it makes a lot more sense. I can totally see how someone that's not really into dogs could be so upset over something like this happening to their child. What really made me upset was her thinking that 'family dogs would never do this'. Not so much that she thought that (she def got a wake-up call), but that is probably how a lot of people still think...and that is what causes so many conflicts between dogs and children. They hear all the stories about dogs hurting children, but with their own dog it's ok? It gives people a false sense of security thinking that 'my' dog would never do such a thing. Sad really.
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Addy, CGC

Let's go for a- walk!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 10, '13 11:04am PST 
Tiller--some excellent points, and the second essay makes an enormous difference in how I view her. And, honestly, not that interested in judging her feelings, if her brain and judgment have kicked in and she's giving good advice, not dangerous advice.

But.

My mom isn't a dog person, doesn't love dogs the way we do,and my first dog, that border collie, was HER first dog ever. She was afraid of dogs, and not happy that my dad bought me a puppy and then, a few weeks later, went back to sea. (He was a merchant marine navigator.)

She was still clear about the fact that the puppy was a living, breathing creature with the ability to feel pain and fear, as well as pleasure and love. And my sister had all the impulsiveness and obliviousness of other living beings that any infant or young toddler has.

My mother needed to see my sister do something that put stress on the dog ONCE, to start enforcing separation, supervision, and active teaching about what was and wasn't appropriate (to the degree my sister was able to understand, which obviously was almost non-existent at first.) It's not about being a dig person or not, or loving dogs as much as we do or not. It was obvious to my mother that having your ear squeezed or being kicked in the ribs are not fun things, and that with the offender's hand in your mouth, it takes real restraint not to bite. It's about having empathy for living things that don't look exactly like you.

It's good that she learned. I'm really pleased and impressed by that. But she didn't make the original mistake merely because she's "not a dog person."
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Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 10, '13 5:19pm PST 
I respect your writing Tiller, as a Mom and a dog person I agree you made excellent pointsapplause
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MIKA&KAI

Akita Pals- Always.
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 5:34am PST 
After reading the second essay I would have to say I agree with Addy on this. I do have a better view of this woman but dog person or not her child even at that young age could have and should have been taught to respect other living creatures.
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Augusta,- CGC, RN

Such a Good Dog!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 6:52am PST 
Ooops, my mistake--the essays weren't three months apart they were a week apart--I was thinking I read March, but the first was May 31 and the next was June 6.

Perhaps she did realize after the comments that she sounded more cavalier and unaware of her mistakes than she was and wanted to clarify . .. or could the two pieces have already been prepared for the two different type columns? Somehow I find it more strange, but maybe that's just the world of newspaper essayists . .. if a piece is too reasoned and balanced, it probably doesn't get nearly the attention.

If you look up Hope Reeves by name, she also wrote a piece on how to steel yourself to the comments if you're going to be an essay writer . . ..
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Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 8:33am PST 
I saw that too Augusta, obviously the author is well aware what she's doing, Journalism 101-"How to Get Your Writing Noticed"...throw something idiotically controversial out there, it grabs you more readers, even if just to see the next inflammatory statement you come up with...I have almost a sick interest to read some of her other stuff and see if there's a pattern there.confused
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Augusta,- CGC, RN

Such a Good Dog!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 9:47am PST 
True, Ophelia. A college journalism student told me he once had a conversation with the editor in chief of our city newspaper, letting him know he didn't like his take on something he'd written in an editorial piece . . . . The editor replied, "Sure it made you mad, but you read it, didn't ya?" . . ..
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Tiller- (Skansen's- Ira in the M

I DO Exist...To- Drive You Batty
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 9:47am PST 
Generally speaking, particularly with things that are meant for internet publication, this is where things are, and I truly resent it. Give us twenty years and there will be a nation of idiots.

Recently on Dogster Mag, they published an article by Tim Link interviewing Jack Hanna. During their talk, he showed his daftness about dog issues, being pro puppy store essentially, and not against mills because most were "inspected."

I was ultra offended they published this comment, and really the only reason why was for controversy and outrage's sake alone. Jack Hanna may own dogs, but he's no more knowing than any dumbo on the street, really. His world is zoo life and conservation. Of course there, zoos are inspected and expected to toe a line. I think maybe there, too, he's used to people complaining about how inhumane it is to keep animals in zoos, when from his perspective it is necessary, for education and conservation. On so many fronts, he is not getting it when these logics transfer to dogs. Whole different ballgame, and a heartbreaking industry.

I challenged Tim Link there for publishing those comments, and he eventually whimpered off. Jack Hanna helped him advance his career, and I thought this was an terrible set up and slap in the face. I challenged that would have been a moment to educate and perhaps print Jack Hanna's responses to more educated concerns, rather than trying to rile and flame a dog loving public.

Totally inflammatory. Totally unnecessary. But it is what gets threads hit with high traffic. And so it goes confused
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Addy, CGC

Let's go for a- walk!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 1:51pm PST 
After reading the second essay I would have to say I agree with Addy on this. I do have a better view of this woman but dog person or not her child even at that young age could have and should have been taught to respect other living creatures.

And I would add, if I wasn't clear about it before, been better protected during the period when he's still too young to fully understand or consistently apply those lessons. Even the best-natured and most empathetic toddler doesn't yet have the reasoning ability or the impulse control of, even, a five-year-old.

But that's what baby gates are for.
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