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herding dog charges cars, nips runners

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
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Panda

sweet little- biter
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 14, '13 9:15pm PST 
My Aussie, Border Collie, Heeler 5 Month Old Barks At, Charges Cars And Tries To Nip Runners. Any Ideas On How To Curb This Behavior? I Tried To Socialize Her From Ten Months On And She Never Did That TheN, But Now She DoeS It Since Age Of 4 Months
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Addy, CGC

Let's go for a- walk!
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 15, '13 12:49am PST 
She's maturing into a herding breed dog. Obedience training is very important, but she's also going to need something toburn that energy and a job to focus on. Agility or disk dog are possibilities. Depending on what's available in your area, so is herding training. smile
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Member Since
12/02/2012
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 15, '13 1:34am PST 
I agree. It's a totally natural behavior for Border Collies being that they are herding dogs. Obedience training will help tone down the behavior. As mentioned by the previous poster, you can do that by enrolling him in herding training. Just try it out.
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Jackson Tan

Lad about town
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 15, '13 1:59am PST 
Definitely needs a job to do! I would enrol in an OB class. In the meantime, get yourself a strong harness and leash. I will put my dog at my side and interrupt the behaviour with a sharp uh uh or hey! I always move to the side and allow joggers and bike riders past us keeping him in check. I always manage it and am aware of our environment - I never talk on the phone or listen to music when walking, my focus is on my dog and the surroundings one hundred percent. If I can see him gearing up to focus on something, I change directions. This is just part and parcel of owning a high drive herding dog, I'm afraid ... You never let your guard down!
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Rigby

Dingbat
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 15, '13 3:18am PST 
Very common behaviour in herding breeds.

As others have said, I would definitely get her into a "job" or sport when she's old enough. Agility is a great way to let these dogs think and release some of the pent up herding drive.

Right now, what I would do in your place is work on focus and attention.
Start in your home, no distractions. Have a treat in both hands, and have Panda sit in front of you. When she makes eye contact, say "yes" and feed from centre. Gradually move your hands further apart and ask for longer eye contact.

When she understands the focus or "watch me" move it outside.
Start in your driveway, with quite a distance from the sidewalk/road.
Have a pocketful of treats.
And work the same exercise outside. Move gradually closer to the road (safely of course). And continue to work the focus.
Eventually, cue it off to the side when a distraction approaches - cars/cyclist/runners. So she will learn that when one of these triggers approaches, she will immediately look to you instead of the distraction smile
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'Barcoola'- Rogue

Door? What door?
 
 
Barked: Sat Mar 16, '13 2:43pm PST 
I would suggest a halter of some sort as well - Rogue started lunging at cars on our walks - never at home, or even in town - just around our block. I got a gentle leader for him and now I can just heel him to the side of the road, put him in a sit-stay and he doesn't move. My mind certainly rests a bit easier knowing he's not quite as likely to try and chase them as before. I still keep a close eye on him though and working on a focus cue has helped as well.
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Panda

sweet little- biter
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 24, '13 8:12am PST 
My AussiFars Now 6 Months Old. Still Bites Us And Still Chases Cars Bikes And Runners. Nips Runners. Won't Stop. Using Treats And Praise As Distractions. The Herding Instinct Seems Unbreakable So Far
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Jackson Tan

Lad about town
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 24, '13 10:39pm PST 
I'm sorry to have to be the one to tell you this, but you have been labouring under a misconception if you think herding instinct is 'breakable'.

I said it could be managed, not broken. This is your dog, like it or lump it. You can't stand against almost a century of careful breeding.
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 25, '13 12:47am PST 
Have you given her a job to do? As counterintuitive as it may sound, herding lessons can help a lot with her undesirable herding behavior. Using that instinct in a controlled setting will give her a positive outlet for her drive and teach her inhibition. Other sports like agility can have a similar effect. You're a lot better off embracing her herding tenancies and channeling them appropriately than trying to extinguish them.

She sounds like a pretty typical young herding breed. Exercise and mental stimulation are going to be your best weapons in this fight. Daily obedience training with a lot of work on focus, as much free running exercise as you can manage, and whatever sports you can try. Basically the same advice you were given before.

Make sure she isn't getting opportunities to practice chasing behaviors. Since she chases cars, runners, and bikes, make sure she's never off lead around them. You'll lose an opportunity to train an alternate behavior, it allows her to keep ingraining the bad behaviors, and it's dangerous for her and the people she's chasing. Be especially careful if she's actually nipping runners, as that could get you into a lot of trouble.

Edited by author Thu Apr 25, '13 1:35pm PST

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Member Since
12/02/2012
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 25, '13 8:48am PST 
You definitely can't break the 'herding habit' your dog has because he has been wired that way. It's in his breed and the only thing you can do is to try to focus his herding urges to something a little more productive as compared to chasing cars and nipping runners. If you continue trying to 'break the habit', you'll just be wasting your energy doing so. It's impossible.
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