GO!

Are we exaggerating or is there a surplus of lucky dog owners?

This is a place to gain some understanding of dog behavior and to assist people in training their dogs and dealing with common behavior problems, regardless of the method(s) used. This can cover the spectrum from non-aversive to traditional methods of dog training. There are many ways to train a dog. Please avoid aggressive responses, and counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice. Please refrain from submitting posts that promote off-topic discussions. Keep in mind that you may be receiving advice from other dog owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a trainer or behaviorist!

  
(Page 3 of 3: Viewing entries 21 to 26)  
1  2  3  
Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 19, '13 5:28pm PST 
I guess what I meant to say is that some of you don't have to flog yourselves over the "right and proper" way to care for pups. In the old days things were mighty different for humans as well as their dogs both good and bad. And really it's like raising human kids, you can get all hysterical about being being the perfect parent, but ultimately you just try to do the best you can figure out and that's okay...if your kid or dog don't become neurotic nutjobs, you can believe in your heart you done a good job as a parentlittle angel
[notify]
Jax (earned- her wings- 5/30/12)

Give me your- toy.
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 19, '13 6:02pm PST 
I agree with everyone that it really does depend on the dog. Jax came from a horrendous place. She could have been someone's science project. She was 4 months old and never had any human contact. I, being stupid, and wanting to do the right thing, rescued her. She was the first dog I had on my own. I grew up with all kinds of dogs and trained them with basic manners and how to walk on a leash. But I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Owning a dog of your own, is very different from growing up with them. Also, I agree that having a dog years ago was a lot different from having one now, given that now most families don't have someone home with their dogs all day. With Jax, she was so afraid of everything. I had to teach her what grass, trees and weeds were. She never saw a food bowl, water bowl, toys, or treats before. It was so pitiful. She was very fear aggressive. I couldn't trust her around anyone. Luckily, the only person she ever bit was a relative, who was very understanding. It took me years to get her to a place where she trusted me so much, that she followed my lead. I could show her new things and have her meet people and she wouldn't wig. Of coarse it had to be on her terms, which was perfectly fine as long as the other people understood. If they didn't, they didn't meet her. In her later years, the vets couldn't believe she was the same dog. She had turned into a well mannered, fairly confident, even tempered girl. She still had to meet people on her terms, but she could meet them, and once she did, they couldn't get rid of her. big laugh I can only imagine what would have happened to her if someone else had gotten her who was not as patient as me, or sent her to the pound or passed her around from home to home. She took a lot of work, and I mean a lot. But she was worth it. She was not a dog for someone who didn't want to put in the time an effort. But, she was one of those great dogs despite her bad start in life. I think some people look for the easy way to do things. smile
[notify]
Jasper

High-flyin' Pup!
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 19, '13 6:20pm PST 
Good topic! I have been really discouraged reading up on all the "shoulds" while looking into getting my first puppy. (I've always had dogs, but never a puppy). It seemed every website and book I looked at had 4950246 reasons why I wouldn't be a good puppy owner.

It wasn't until chatting with one of my customers who does a TON of rescue work that I really felt good about bringing a puppy in. She pointed out that I've got an RVT license, a job where a puppy can come to work with me every day and meet healthy, vaccinated dogs, and the patience to raise multiple pre-wean kittens year after year, so odds are that my puppy will be fairly successful. wink

Seriously though, for someone who is already prone to questioning themselves on every little thing, reading up on puppy raising can be VERY discouraging. Which I guess is the point.
[notify]



Member Since
02/19/2013
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 19, '13 11:07pm PST 
That's a lot of "You can't get a puppy". I don't think anyone can define the perfect dog owner. I think the concern is "We've seen too many bad dog owners". So there's a lot of caution. Unfortunately dogs are being put down every day; millions and I think the message that should really be getting a cross is. "Make sure you want one before you get one". There are also those who want to humanize the dog as much as possible thus socializing and training is highly important. If you don’t want to humanize the dog, certainly a good home, a well fed healthy dog, a little socialization and some training will do fine. I am one that try to humanize the dog as much as possible, my reason is so that I can get more doors open to them. It was very discouraging for me trying to find my Shih Tzu. A lot of the so called breeders wanted someone that didn’t work. I work, so how is the puppy going to eat if I don't work. Eventually I found someone who felt working was necessary and I went and picked up my pup. My mother fell in love with my pup and picked him up every day, so the puppy was never home alone and now my mother lives with me and he's never alone. He shares his days with her Yorkie. Training and socialization is valid, anything that keeps the dog out of the shelter has merit. Some dogs need a lot of training, some dogs need specialized training and some dogs need a little training, that depends on the owner, the breed and the temperament of the pup. Training also depends on the pup’s environment and what the owner expects of the pup. One paw doesn’t fit all. One type of owner doesn’t fit all the dogs. There is no lucky owner, only lucky dogs. The single most important thing and the only thing that makes a good owner, is “Responsibility” and “Commitment”. The pup should fit in well with one’s life style. Too many pups are still being abused, not trained properly, a mismatch with their owners so they end up at the shelters. My first dog I trained on my own, he had very little training; he seemed to me to be just naturally welled behaved. I could take him anywhere and he seemed to be just fine with people and other dogs. He trained very easily and was the greatest pup and companion throughout his life time. My current pup, had aggressive issues and his puppy responses weren’t normal, he is also in a different err so for him I went through a lot of professional behavior training and heavy socialization, including traveling because I wanted a dog I could take anywhere with me. After all is said and done, he’s now a very well adjusted happy dog, you can’t even tell he was an overly aggressive as a pup. My mom has a Yorkie, she claimed he couldn’t be trained he was too excited; he would never get his CGC. Well I didn’t believe mom, I saw a cute little spunky dog with a lot of potential, and he just needed a fair chance. The Yorkie obtained his CGC and all those commands she said he wouldn’t listen to, he learned and performs. In the Yorkie’s case it’s a mismatch. I try to humanize both dogs their training never stops, its continuum. If you’re not interested in humanizing your dog then there’s no reason to do as much training as I do. Too many dogs are ending up in the shelters and still too many being abused. There are no lucky owners, only “responsible owners” who are “committed to caring” for their pets and that includes preventing them from ending up in a shelter. What we have is a lack of responsible owners and the unlucky dogs are ending up in the shelter and that’s why you see all the “must” some of it is a little extreme~d.
[notify]
Ace

Mischief is my- middle name
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 20, '13 6:02am PST 
Nailed it on responsibility and commitment. If you're responsible and committed to your dog, no matter what, you're likely to be a lucky dog owner.

And definitely, no one size fits all. Some people have more of a capacity to accept "bad" behavior, to accept a quirkiness rather than train the dog out of it. And that's fine as long as they're committed to keeping the dog, and the behavior isn't inherently harmful or dangerous to the dog or other people or pets.

I am thrilled that we now have three dogs that do not destroy furniture, have no aggression toward people or dogs, and are housebroken. Other issues I'll work on, but if they're too ingrained to train out, it doesn't matter, I love my dogs and will accept their quirks (especially Ace) forever if need be.
[notify]
Opheila

It ain't over- till the fat- kitty sings
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 20, '13 7:03pm PST 
Definitely the commitment...poor Soph was my training pup-I had other dogs in the past but none with as many issues as my pretty girl. If I had followed the "shoulds" I'd probably have a maltese, I wasn't prepared for a paranoid pitty. But I made the commitment to figure her out and we learned together. Callie was a whole new ballgame too but we learned with him too-credit Sophie with whipping me into physical shape before he came along...
...also experience raising a bunch of human teens makes ya stronger than ya ever thought possible shock
Love, commitment, determination and a big sense of humor...and we're lucky to have two of the most wonderful bullies on the planetpuppypuppy
[notify]
  (Page 3 of 3: Viewing entries 21 to 26)  
1  2  3